Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Biographies & Photos Of L. P. People

[NOTES AT END]

Adair, David
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir Georges, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Adair, General John
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir Georges, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Alexander, ?

Alling, William
He was born September 24th, 1807, in Newark, New Jersey. He connect himself with the firm of Alling & Bro., of Newark, Madison, Indiana and New Orleans, La. Early in the thirties. They were one of the largest clothing houses in the United States at that time. Mr. William Alling attended to the New Orleans end of the business. He was one of the directors and otherwise connected with several banking institutions of the country between 1840 & 1857. He was united in the holy bonds of matrimony in 1834 to Miss Julia Teasdale of South Carolina. They had seven children, five boys and two girls. Three of the boys and one girl only survive in 1857, and going to Europe and later to Algeria, Africa. When the war commenced the oldest Albert A. returned and joined the Confederates side. He met his fate at the Battle of Malvern Hill. The others getting worse meanwhile the last one dying in 1876.
Mr. Alling often went backwards and forwards during his family’s stay abroad, and in 1865 he went into partnership with Mr. Henry Frellson, they buying cotton property together. He returned with his family from ???ng childhood. They were unusually bright, being especially so in art, several of their works receiving honorable mention in the Academy of Art of Paris, France. They were predisposed to pulmonary troubles, which was the cause of Mr. Allings retiring from active business Africa in 1876, since which time he has lived quietly and unobtrusively on his Black Bayou Plantation. He had the sad misfortune to lose his wife and companion of fifty-four years in 1888.
Mr. Alling was much above the ordinary man. He was noted for his truthfulness and general integrity, for sincerity and candor. A good citizen a kind friend and liked by all who knew him.
During his last illness he was faithfully and affectionately attended by his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Edward Alling, who has the sympathy of the community.
Mr. William Alling departed this life October 15, 1892, aged 75 years and 21 days.

EMAIL:
Alsbrooks, William M. From: Rosalyn Alsobrook
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2000 14:07:01 -0800
From: Alsobrook
Please add William M Alsobrook to the list of Civil War Casualties.
He died in Vicksburg on Christmas Day (Dec. 25), 1862. From Robert Sage:
Vet. Name: William M. Alsobrook, Widow's name: Ann Alsobrook
Co. A, Regiment 31, Division LA. He died of illness in 1862. Widow's application 7/13/1892
Also, from "Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers & Confederate Commands". New Orleans, LA:np, 1920, Vol 1, p. 53.
--- Alsobrook, William M.,Private, Company A. 31st La. Infty. En.
Monroe, La., April 12th, 1862.

From Robert Sage, descendant of Ann's sister, Susan (Snow) Sage, "I found a book Arkansas Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications by Francis T. Ingmire [an index]. For Sevier County: Veteran's name, William M. Alsobrook; widow's name, Ann Alsobrook. William was in A company, Regiment 31, LA,
Division, 1862-1862 . He died of Illness 12/25/1862 . Ann submitted her pension 7/13/1892."
In 1891 Arkansas began granting pensions to indigent Confederate veterans, Ann applied in 1892 as stated and, according to the papers sent by the Arkansas History commission, she was allowed a $50 pension on March 11, 1901 by the Pension Board for Sevier County. On the application paperwork filled out by the Pensions Board, it states she is incapacitated for manual labor by reason of Nervous Prostration. [Extreme exhaustion from inability to control physical and mental activities] and it is dated June 20, 1892.
On the Proof of Service form, signed by the Sevier County, Arkansas Justice of the Peace, J.M. Baker, it has that Ann Alsobrook, widow of William M. Alsobrook, is incapacitated for manual labor by reason of "old age".
In an unsigned letter from Oak Grove, La dated simply 4-28 (I assume of 1892). "Mrs. Ann Alsobrook, I received your letter. Some time since tryed (sic) to obtain all the the information that you needed in your case. I saw several of our company . I saw John Riding McKee and Jack Lester, all that they could recollect was that your husband did belong to our company & that he died. Could not tell the day of his death nor the day that we were mustered in to service. I think that that (sic) we were mustered in to Service in May or June 1862 and that your husband died in Dec 1862 at Vicksburg Miss. Sorry that I am not able to give you all the information that you need. Our Company was Company A 31 LA Regiment Rps ( or Bps?) Andrew Jackson."

You'll find him listed as William S. Alsobrook in the 1860 Census. The S is apparently wrong because all other references to a middle initial have been "M".
ABSTRACTS: Dec. 01, 1866 - Married. Sage~Sanders. On Thursday, the 1st of Nov., by the Rev. Wm. Keller, Rev. Thomas J. Sage to Mrs. Susan Sanders, all of Carroll Parish, La.. Sanders was her first husband's name. Her maiden name was Snow. If you had
anything on John C. Snow, her brother, that'd be great. But I think he was in a neighboring Parish. I was a witness in a court matter for Ann, which is why I think he lived fairly close.

Fact is, there's a whole nest of family there at one time. Snows tied into the Alsobrooks by marriage before coming there as a group. Ann Snow married William M. Alsobrook. They moved to Carroll Parish by 1860 and at least two of Ann's siblings had moved there, too. They all came from Dyer County, Tennessee. (1850 Census)

I'm not sure when the Galloways hit Carroll Parish, but they tie into the family when George Lewis married Ann Eliza, daughter of Ann and William Alsobrook.

There may have been one other Alsobrook in the area, a Willis Alsobrook, but
I don't have enough info yet to know who he is.

(I have a little bit more research stuff on some SANDERS.)
Here is for a Susan Snow in the 1860 Census: # 427
Snow, Susan 45 f. Mantua maker LA. _____ $500.
, Eugenia F. 18 f. LA
, Sarah L. 16 f. LA
, Robert W. A. 12 m. LA
(mantua is a "fancy cloak")
This has to be Ann (Snow) Alsobrook's mother. I didn't know she was in La. After her father ditched the family and went to Florida, I didn't know what happened to her mother.

James and Samuel Galloway were living in Ouachita Parish in 1830 (both on page 187 Census of Ouachita Parish, La.. James is living in a residence with 3 other males and 2 females. Samuel is living by himself. James married Martha Trimble on May 20, 1832 (see Book A, pg. 51 Concordia Parish, La. Marriages) The Carroll Parish 1840 census show James Galloway (page 130); 8 males and 2 females living there. James is Franklin's father.
1850 Census:
523 Galloway, James 60 m KY planter 28000
Galloway, Martha 50 f OH
Galloway, James M. 24 m LA

524 Galloway, Franklin 38 m MS planter 32000
Galloway, Jane 26 f MS
Galloway, Oren 8 m LA
Galloway, Oscar 6 m LA
Galloway, Franklin 4 m KY
Galloway, baby 1 m LA

1860 Census:
290 Galloway, James 65 M, planter, NC, $45,000 $48,650.
, Martha 59 F, wife TN
, Thomas A. 25 M, overseer MS $650.

TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 10, 1866
The Police Jury met pursuant to adjournment; present as on last evening. Be it ordained by the Police Jury, that hereafter the School Districts and the lines and bounds thereof in and for the parish of Carroll, be and are hereby established to be the same as the Police Jury Wards in and for said parish; District Number 1 to be bound the same as Ward 1, and the other districts to be bound the same as the other Wards; and that the following gentlemen be and they are hereby appointed School Directors in and for said parish, to wit; District No. 1, Henry Goodrich, William Craig, and Mark Valentine, Sr.; District 2, S. P. Bernard, G. W. McCarrell, and Ed. F. Newman; District No. 3, William Coleman, Aaron Garza, and Will S. Owen; District No. 4, F. D. Galloway, Samuel Templeton, and S. L. Chambliss; District No. 5, J. W. Bell, P. W. Longmire, and J. A. Mercer; District No. 6, William Keller, J. W. Dunn, and E. D. Hannegan; District No. 7, D. M. Pugh, H. W. McLemore, and Warren M. Scott.
That James Irwin be and he is hereby appointed overseer of the road from G. R. Newman's upper line, to Mrs. M. Galloway's lower line, and to control for road purposes the hands on the Bell place and the Rolla place.
That C. M. McCleod be and he is hereby appointed overseer of the road from Mrs. Galloway's lower line to Goodrich's Store; and to control for road purposes the hands on Mrs. Savage's place and the hands on the Galloway place.

April 25, 1868 ~ DIED ~ On the 3rd inst., at the "Edgewood Plantation", Mrs. Martha Galloway, aged 68 years. From: Carroll Record newspaper

Newspaper AD. From: Carroll Record newspaper
----------------------------------------------------------------
S T R A Y M U L E
TAKEN UP BY F. D. G A L L O W A Y:
on Joe's Bayou, a small Bay Mare
Mule, about four years old, defect in the
right fore food, branded M. W.
J. L. CHEATHAM, Register Strays
Floyd, La. - June 8, 1866
----------------------------------------------------------------

Amacker, Amos Kent (see BIOGRAPHIES: Colonel Nicholson)

Amaker, David
At the Versailles Peace Conference of 1919 held in Paris, David Amacker served as an interpreter for Messrs. Venizelos of Greece and Kramar of Czechoslovakia, translating from English into French for them.
Stephen Bonsal in his book Unfinished Business (1944) accurately records those meeting. Bonsal commends David Amacker and his work: "Again (after the first appointee proved flustered and incapable) I dived deep down into the language pool of the American delegation and fished out a young Lieutenant from Louisiana, who spoke clear French and also the pleasing English of the Deep South. He was drafted to the job in which he acquitted himself well. He was not at all awe-stricken by his close association of the representatives of the shattered monarchies of Europe, or with the outstanding new men of the budding democracies."
David Amacker attended Mississippi College and Princeton University. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, and graduated in 1922. He majored primarily in French and German. Later he taught at Culver Military Academy, Dartmouth University, Louisiana Tech, again at Dartmouth University, and finally at Southwestern University in Memphis, where he was a Professor of Political Science.

Amacker, Robert
Robert Amacker, second son of the Amos Kent Amacker, was named Louisiana's Ginner of the Year by the Louisiana-Mississippi Cotton Ginners Association in 1965. A native of Lake Providence, he received his schooling at Lake Providence and at the University of AR. Associated with Robert in the Hollybrook Gin Company, from time to time, were his uncle Robert Nicholson, A. P. Surles, Tate Lawrence and W. G. Wyly.
Mr. Amacker and his wife, the former Alice Dutton, have three daughters, Margaret, Alice Ellen and Mary Muir, and two sons, Robert Jr., and Amos Kent (Major). A nephew, Kent Amacker, made his home with them after his parents died in 1957.
Alice, Roberts’s wife, was Director of the Dept. of Public Welfare.

Amacker, Major (see BIOGRAPHIES: Colonel Nicholson)

Amos, Eva Blache (see BIOGRAPHIES: Brock, Joseph Lawrence)

Anderson, Ace“Leon LeFevre says his parents were living near Floyd at the time, and he heard his mother say that the Yankees, five or six white men, plus about 200 Negroes, crossed the Macon at Poverty Point and started toward Floyd. A runner on horseback cut through the woods and notified the town. Most of the man had gone fishing that day so Ace Anderson decided the best thing to do would be to try to turn them back. He knew that colored people took orders automatically from a white person, and he counted on influencing them. To the horror of his wife, he rode out alone to meet the invaders and met them just south of Floyd, the Negroes in front and the white officers to the rear. He, Mr. Anderson, raised his hands signaling a halt, which was obeyed. He told them the town knew of their coming and had barricaded themselves in stores and houses around the court house with the intention of mowing them down as they came in. He was warning them as he hated to see needless bloodshed. He said the “Home Guard,” (see Civil War: Home Guard, on this website) including the guerrillas were on duty. This did it, the Negroes turned back and the white men followed. This perhaps was one attempt to raid Floyd, but not the last.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

“William Pitt Kellogg, a colored man under the domination of northern Yankees, was elected governor of the state in 1872. He had vast appointive powers, in fact, he appointed at will, men for man offices. He appointed Jim Ridley, a native of Carroll Parish , living near Floyd, as representative for Carroll Parish at one time. He appointed Harrison Henson as magistrate for Ward 2, and Sheriff for Carroll Parish. Leon LeFevre said these colored appointees west of the Macon never served. Magistrate Henson came to Floyd to hold court one day. After Ace Anderson held a conference with him, he departed without holding court and never returned in the capacity of magistrate again. “ Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Anderson, Marie (see Clement, T. I.)

NEWSPAPER:
Anderson, R. K. "Capt."
We give below as short sketch of the life of this gentleman, who died last Tuesday week at the residence of Mr. P. D. Quays, [his half bro.-in-law] at Brunette.
He was born at Meadville, Franklin County, Mississippi, March 1, 1842 Hi father was a native of Vermont, his mother a native of South Carolina.
He came with his parents Judge Robert Anderson and Mrs. Amy Anderson, to Carroll Parish about 1846. He was educated at home. His father died at Coopers Well, Miss., in 1855, and his mother died at Marshall, Tex. in 1863.
He enlisted at the age of 19 in the "Carroll Rebels" Capt. Ed Coleman commanding. He was elected Second Junior Lieutenant of the company, was attached to the Fourth Louisiana Battalion under Col. John McEnery, Of Monroe--army of Virginia. He resigned, came home and went out as an independent in Col. H. R. Lott's Cavalry--army of Tennessee. He was taken sick with camp fever, started home, was taken a prisoner and carried to Memphis, Tenn. He was paroled and went to Tyler, Texas via Mexico, where he joined Bown's Regiment of Texas troops. He returned to Carroll Parish in 1866, where he merchandised and planted with varying success for a few years, when he sold out his mercantile interest.
He was a Republican in politics, and filled many responsible positions.
His father was a native of Vermont, his mother a native of South Carolina. He was in poor health for over two years previous to his death, and up to the time of his demise was virtually confined to his room since last December. NOT SURE OF DATE

Archie, Ed

Asberry, John
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Asberry, a Negro, served as a Justice of the Peace and in 1877 he became the Sheriff of East Carroll Parish. His area as Justice of the Peace was Ward 4. He served in this office until 1884." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “In 1895 on the Republican Executive Committee were M. E. Massee from Ward 3 and John Asberry from Ward 4, a brother of Isham Asberry. W. M. Jennifer, Principal, published The Carroll Banner in 1890 with Reverend S. Martin as associated editor in 1892.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Asberry, Isham
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “In 1895 on the Republican Executive Committee were M. E. Massee from Ward 3 and John Asberry from Ward 4, a brother of Isham Asberry. W. M. Jennifer, Principal, published The Carroll Banner in 1890 with Reverend S. Martin as associated editor in 1892.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

FOUND ONLINE:
Ashbridge, A. M.
Captain Ashbridge was by profession a druggist, and thoroughly educated in his calling. Prior to the war he had lived in the city of New Orleans, where his proficiency was recognized, and his services were always in demand.
At the very beginning of the war, he volunteered as a confederate soldier. Commencing as a private, he arose by his efficiency to the rank of Captain.
His company was attached to the 15th Louisiana Regiment, and was in the command of the immortal Stonewall Jackson till the death of that heroic leader. He was in the memorable Pennsylvania campaign, and took part in the Battle of Gettsyburg. After that campaign, worn down by fatigue and ill health, he obtained a sick leave of absence, and went to Georgia to recuperate. There he met Miss Fanny Sparrow, the accomplished daughter of General Edward Sparrow, the Confederate States Senator from Louisiana, and chairman of the military committee. He sought and won her heart; and in 1864, they married.
They have lived happily together since, being perfectly congenial, and at all times showing the utmost sympathy and love for each other.
They have been blessed with a large family of children, exceedingly bright and attractive of whom the lamented Edward Sparrow Ashbridge was the eldest.
Since the war, Capt. Ashbridge has been engaged chiefly in commercial pursuits. He was for years employed in the commission house of Johnson & Goodrich in New Orleans, where his efficient services were remunerated by the handsome salary of $250 a month. He subsequently removed with his family to this parish, in the year 1873, where he has since lived.
Captain Ashbridge was an honest and upright man. He was conscientious in his transactions, and faithful to his duty, whosoever it might be. He was a brave soldier, loved by his comrades and fearless of any peril which the life might bring. No better man, no better citizen, no better husband and father than Capt. Ashbridge lives in our community.

BIOGRAPHIES: “Stephen Voelker was born here, the son of Clemens A. Voelker, of German descent, and Kate Ashbridge. He grew up in Lake Providence and after high school attended Tulane University where he majored in business administration. He served in the Army during WWI and was the youngest man from Louisiana to be sent overseas. He organized the Tallulah Production Credit Association and managed the organization during its extension into ten parish. This association greatly aided farmers in increased production. Mr. Voelker moved from Tallulah to N. O., LA where he served as President of the Federal Intermediate Credit Bank until his retirement. He & Dorothy Pittman, daughter of J. W. Pittman, Sr., were married in 1924. Their children are Stephen, Jr., and Eva Stewart.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Atlas, Clora
A midwife by trade, did not lose any babies that she delivered during the course of her practice. Was said to have been en route to her home after delivering a baby when struck by two cars. First pedestrian casualty of an automobile accident in East Carroll Parish. “Find A Grave” website.

Atlas, King

Babb, Sadie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Sadie Babb is the mother of six. She was a bookkeeper and treasurer of the Methodist Church. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Baker, John

Baker, W. K.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Banks, Leandrew (see also Fields, Joseph)
"Local descendants can trace their ancestry back to: Gertrude Fields Howard who married Leandrew Banks. Her parents were Joseph and Iscoy Walker Fields. His parents were Andrew and Mary Banks. Iscovy's parents were Nicholas and Killy Walker.
There are numerous descendants, including great grandchildren Rosie Mary Banks Richardson and Willie Dorsey. Willie lives (in 1976) in Newellton, Louisiana. Rosie worked as receptionist at the East Carroll Parish Division of Family Services. For twenty years she was a clerk at the Fashion Shop. For thirteen years she was secretary to Rosa Blockwood, Assistant Home Demonstration Agent. She also served as secretary for two local Elks Clubs and as a member of the Altar Society of St. Patrick's Catholic Church. She is/was a member of the National Council of Negro Women and of NAACP." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Banks, Rose Mary (married a Richardson)
"Her great grandmother was Gertrude Fields Howard Banks and grandfather Leandrew. Rosie worked as receptionist at the East Carroll Parish Division of Family Services. For twenty years she was a clerk at the Fashion Shop. For thirteen years she was secretary to Rosa Blockwood, Assistant Home Demonstration Agent. She also served as secretary for two local Elks Clubs and as a member of the Altar Society of St. Patrick's Catholic Church. She is/was a member of the National Council of Negro Women and of NAACP." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Banks, Tillman
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the Afrocan Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Barrow, Miss Evelyn (see Cammack, Abner Sam)

Bass, John C.
“While many of his activities since early manhood have identified him with the plantation interests of East Carroll Parish, Mr. Bass has given twenty or more years to public service. He is the present sheriff and was deputy sheriff of the parish from 1903 to 1912. From 1912 to 1920 he held the office of clerk of courts and in 1920 and again in 1924 was elected sheriff. Sheriff Bass was born on the Tyrone Plantation located four miles from the Town of Lake Providence on the north side of the lake, on May 8, 1882. His parents were John C. and Josephine (Archabald) Bass, now deceased, his father passing away in 1920 at the age of seventy-six and his mother in 1924, aged sixty-nine. John C. Bass was born in Hinds County, Mississippi, came to Louisiana when a young man and served eight years as sheriff of East Carroll Parish at first by appointment and then by election. He was also a member of the police jury and the Parish School Board and in education and character was well fitted for leadership in the affairs of the community. He had taught school when a young man, and as a Southern soldier fought for the cause of the South until finally as the result of repeated wounds was discharged on account of disability and for the rest of his life suffered the infirmities of a cripple. He was with a regiment of Louisiana troops in the battle of Chickamauga. He served as commander of the local post of the United Confederate Veterans and attended all reunions of his old comrades. For a number of years he was master of the local lodge of Masons, attended the Grand Lodge of that order and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Church. Though handicapped physically, he was very competent and expert in the management of business affairs. Two years before his death his eyesight failed completely. Of a family of five sons and five daughters, the only survivors are John C. and Baker A. The latter is a planter in East Carroll Parish. John C. Bass was educated in local schools and the University of the South at Kewanee, Tennessee, and after his college career took up the work of planting and pursued that occupation steadily until his first appointment as deputy sheriff. He owns the Roberta Plantation in Wards 3 & 6. Mr. Bass enjoys such active recreation as hunting and he has a camp in the swamps of East Carroll. He married Miss Margaret Montgomery, daughter of Vail Montgomery. They have a daughter, Margaret. Mrs. Bass is a member of the Episcopal Church while he is a Methodist. He has served four consecutive years as master of the local Masonic fraternity and belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Monroe and the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Lake Providence. A History of Louisiana, (vol. 2), pp. 238-239, by Henry E. Chambers. Published by The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, 1925.”
E. Carroll Parish, Louisiana Submitted by Mike Miller Aug 2001
Submitted to the LAGenWeb Archives Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/la/lafiles.htm

Bastrop, Baron De
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir Georges, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840.
Baron de Bastrop did make a direct contribution to Northeast Louisiana y interesting others with means and influence in the area. It is said that he knew and secured the interest of Edward Lumpton, who influence Thomas Jefferson to make the Louisiana purchase. General John Adair, Judge Charles Lynch, Aaron Burr, and Stephen Girard, The Philadelphia philanthropist, became interest in the “Washita” country through the Baron, who was an adventurer and a speculator. He dreamed of a great wheat state and trade with the Indians, d, but, of course, he and the others were more interested in the land near the large waterways, the only means of transportation for large quantities of supplies. Thus, the land between the rivers was left to land speculators and eventually the small farmers and planters.” From “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Barker, William
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Barton, Dr.
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Bass, Abraham
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Bass, Job
EARLY SETTLERS: “According to local courthouse records, the first settlers recording their land holdings did so in the early 1800‘s. One was Job Bass, who according to the 1810 census was listed as the owner of Lookout Plantation. John L. Buck in 1826 owned Pecan Grove Plantation which he purchased from the U. S. Government. Samuel Galloway, for whom Galloway Bayou is named, sold land in 1833 to William Henderson. John A. Love, a Methodist minister, in 1834 bought 726.66 acres at Patterson Point.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Baur, Betty (see BIOGRAPHIES: Lensing, Leo)

Baur, Grace
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Grace Baur is a secretary, designer, and craftsman.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Beard, Isham B. & Elizabeth Curry (wife)
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the SE of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Beard, I. B. Beard
He was born Sept. 18th 1810, if Jefferson Co., Miss. His father, James Beard moved to Carroll Parish about the year 1825. In 1832, he went to Warren Co., Miss., and married Miss Elizabeth Currie. He stayed there one year, and moved back to Carroll Parish. On the 1st on Nov. 1859, his wife died, after bearing him twelve children, six of whom are still living. In 1835, he joined the M. E. Church Suth, of which he was a faithful member, until he died. He was again married; this time to Miss Cordelia M. E. Newhall, who still survives him. From this union sprang six children, five of whom still live. He had been the owner of his first and present home fifty years.
After a long and useful life of 80 years, after fulfilling his mission, Mr. I. B. Beard quietly passed away at his home last Saturday, surrounded by children and grandchildren. His life was that of an upright, Christian man, an honor to his community and a blessing to his notoriety. (Not sure where this info came from)

Beard, James T.
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the SE of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Beebe, ?
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Beck, Helen Key (see BIOGRAPHIES: VanFossen, Samuel)

EMAIL:
Belden, Albert G. Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 21:03:47 EST
From: LucyRea@aol.com
Albert Goodrich Belden's background. I know he was a Yankee soldier - Have just discovered recently that he enlisted in Aurora, Il., and it is rumored inside the family that he fought with Cantrell's Querillas. (probably Quantrill’s) He had to have been stationed in your area, else he couldn't have met and married Lucy Jane Holland. Incidentally, I'm also trying my best to learn about Lucy Jane's father, Newton Holland, and would loves to know when her mother, Rosina B. Holland died.
I know she was still living during the siege of Vicksburg, and know, too, that there was a son, John Bittleman Holland, who fought in the War and was paroled both after Vicksburg's capture and the War's end. He married a Mattie McBeth and moved to New Orleans, I think. LAURETTE

EMAIL:
Belden, Charles M.
Date: Wed, 7 Apr 1999 16:57:56 EDT
From: LucyRea@aol.com
“Thanks for the Banner Democrat clippings. The puzzle gets deeper and deeper.
I'm particularly interested in the family story regarding the suicide, due to AGB's loosing Sheriff's election to carpetbagger. Too, I've never heard of Charles M. Belden, but would certainly think there must be a connection.”
“Many of my family lived and died in the Parish, including my mother, Lucy Rea, daughter of Capt. Richard N. Rea of Alabama Plantation and Lake Providence, who was born and raised there. Other families in your area were the Newton Hollands, and Albert Goodrich Belden and his family.“ LUCY

Bell, Boyd

Belser, Ozell (see also Trieschmann, William F.)

Benham, George

Benjamin, Graham

Benjamin, William Family (see also Hood, Harbird)
"Cotton ginning brought William Benjamin of New York to Louisiana. He was a friend of the inventor Eli Whitney and came to this state sell and install cotton gins. He married Rachel Graham of Carroll Parish and they made their home at Homestead Plantation which she inherited. When these two died, their three young sons went to New York to live with relatives. Two of them died young, one in the Civil War, and William Jr., the survivor, after his marriage to Caroline Breithaupt of New York, returned to Homestead to live. Of their five children, William Briethaupt Benjamin continued to make his home here, and married Elizabeth McCullock. They were the parents of three daughters, and one, Mrs. George T. Hider (Virginia), still lives here. The Benjamin Family lived on Homestead until 1910." From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Benham, George C.
RECONSTRUCTION: “Some northerners did move into the parish, including George C. Benham and the former Union general, William L. McMillan. Disparagingly called carpetbaggers by their neighbors, McMillan and Benham were successful as planters. Few other northern speculators survived for more than a season.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

“A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. All office were filled with colored people, Cain Sartain was senator, followed by Jackworth Clay. Jim Gardener was representative for awhile.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Benjamin, Alex, Pvt. Co. D. 3rd La. Cavalry (Harrison's). Federal Rolls of Prisoners of War Captured Natchez, Miss., July 15th, 1863. Forward to Camp Morton, Ind. Desires to take the Oath and Give Bond Sept. 7th, 1863. Bondsman, Alexander D. H., Lake Providence. Confederate Research Sources Volume 1 B. page 165

Benjamin, Margaret
Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769-1923: Volume 4
LUTHER E. WHEAT, M. D.
“On the 29th of September, 1919, Mr. Pennebaker was married in Jackson, Mississippi, to Miss Margaret Benjamin, a native of Lake Providence, Louisiana, and a relative of some of the most prominent families of Mississippi. She was educated in a college at Columbus, Mississippi, and is an accomplished artist. One of her paintings, a landscape, won a prize at the Tri-State Fair at Memphis in 1922. Socially Mr. and Mrs. Pennebaker occupy an enviable position and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by their many friends. Mr. Pennebaker is a member of the Memphis University Club. He does not hesitate to announce himself as the supporter of law and order, of progress, reform and improvement, nor to show to his fellowmen that he is actuated by the highest ideals in the matter of public duty as well as of private service.”

Benjamin, Virginia (see Hider, Mrs. George Turner)

Benjamin, William
A few planters signed an allegiance to the U. S. that brought a rift among neighbors. There were those willing to lose everything for the cause of the South and felt bitter toward any neighbor signing such an oath. These unfortunates were often sought out by the guerrillas and murdered, one such was Graham Benjamin whose father built Homestead Plantation located south of Lake Providence. Reference: Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

EMAILS:
Benton, Warren M.
Wed, 19 Jan 2000 07:39:25 -0700
From: Ellen Crawford
“As to some of Warren's marriages. I don't know where he married some of his wives, but he and Martha Bass were married in Warren Co across the river. I think he traveled quite a bit back and forth to KY. His mother was still living in the 1860 census. She was born around 1768. She was a daughter of Billingsley Roberts and Betty Manen and was born in Maryland.” ELLEN

Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 08:15:44 -0700
From: Ellen Crawford
“We were out of town for a couple of days, so I have just now read your messages. Thanks so much for sending all the info. I did look at your web page on E Carroll Parish. You have put a lot of work into that and it is great.
I have spent quite a bit of time studying records of E Carroll. For several years I had a brick wall on my Benton family. My gr-grandfather Sully Reeves Benton was a grandson of Warren M Benton. Or at least I believed he was. I knew that Sully's mother was Mary M Benton, but it took forever to find his father's name. I felt that Warren was his grandfather but had no proof. Finally I went through land and court records line by line. I knew that Augustus Job Bass was a grandson of Warren. I finally across an entry for the tutorship of Augustus Job Bass. And there it was. Erasmus Benton, uncle of Augustus and Warren his grandfather. Then I went through the probate records
line by line and finally found where Mary M Benton had filed to be executrix for her husband's estate and tutor of their children, Sully Reeves and George Warren Benton. Her husband's name was Erasmus and he died in 1858. I thought it odd that his name did not appear in any index I could find in any of the records.
Erasmus Benton's widow, Mary M, married James M Climer. He was in the Civil War. About 1867 they moved to Hill Co TX.
Warren's first marriage was in KY for Erasmus was born in KY. I don't know if she died in KY or in GA. I do know he next married Lucy Jones. I have never found either of the marriages, but in court records of E Carroll I found where he filed an action to try to gain control of the estate that his daughter Sarah had received from her grandmother Lucy Thompson Jones Hunt in GA.
I found that his 3rd wife Martha Bass had been married twice prior and had a daughter by a previous husband.
His 4th wife was Mary Royall. His 5th wife was Mary, last name unknown. I found in court records that she took him to the cleaners and I think there was some court action still going on when he died.” ELLEN

Bernard, Dr.
EARLY BUSINESS OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, LA.: Lake Providence has always been the seat of government for the parish, except from 1855 to 1870, when, as a part of the parish of Carroll, the seat was moved to Floyd (now West Carroll). Some of the business house and churches of the early town mentioned in old newspapers are: (1848-1881) Bernard’s Drug Store, Donahue & Bernard. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Berry, J. M.

Bieller, Elizabeth Lester (see Bosworth, Mrs. Felix Bosworth)

Biggs, Thomas G. (D. D. S.)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Dr. Thomas G. Biggs came to Lake Providence in 1919, following his discharge from the U. S. Army. He was born in Hickory, Miss., on Mar. 20, 1894, the son of Thomas J. Biggs and Mary C. McGee. There were nine children. His father became a planter in Caldwell Parish where Dr. Biggs grew up. He received his dental degree from Tulane University.
In 1919 he became Mayor of L. P., and served for 24 years. He was chairman of the parish Democratic Executive Committee, President of the Board of Election Supervisors, and an active member of the Mason order, as well as a member of the Rotary Club, president from 1947-48.
Dr. Biggs and Tommy Mable Greer of Clarks, La., were married on January 1, 1918. Their only child, Thomas G. Biggs, Jr. became a physician and has his own clinic in Oak Grove, La.
Since Dr. Biggs served as Worshipful Master of Pecan Grove Masonic Lodge No. 222 for 15 years, he was given full Masonic honors at his funeral in 1956.
Mayor William B. Cone issued a proclamation honoring Dr. Biggs and businesses were closed in respect.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Bishop, Edna Aurelia (see Brock, Joseph Lawrence)

Bishop, George Poole (see Brock, Joseph Lawrence)

Blackburn, Dr. David Flournoy
“There was for Blackburn men that came from Kentucky and settled in Carroll Parish. William E. Blackburn, an attorney, David Flournoy Blackburn and Henry B. Blackburn, both show land purchases in 1850, and both were physicians. George Blackburn later settled in this region. Dr. David Flournoy Blackburn and wife Catherine A. Shelby came down the Mississippi River on a flatboat. They named their plantation Shelburn which was a combination of the family names of Shelby and Blackburn.
Six children were born to David and Catherine, 4 daughters, Jane S., who married Dr. William Morehead of Washington County, Mississippi, Julia Blackburn who married Edward H. Davis of Belle Meade Plantation, Kate, who married William L. Gay, and Lizzie F., who married Frank H. Coleman. The two boys were George F., who married Rebecca B. Williams of Sherwood Plantation, and Thomas.
David Blackburn died on December 1, 1860, in the arms of General Edward Sparrow who had come to visit the patient. (4 generations later General Sparrow's great-great grandson married David Flournoy's great-great granddaughter; Frank Voelker and Isabel Ransdell.)
[*Cass Knight Shelby Notes: Letters from Mrs. Schneider, a descendant written to CKS in 1945, says Caterine was suppose to have been born on a flatboat on the Miss. River when her parents were moving from TN to MS.]
Catherine A. Blackburn died in 1880 at her beloved Shelburn. The succession proved that Mrs. Blackburn was the capable manager her husband thought.
According to a later newspaper account General John B. McPherson, the Federal officer in charge at Lake Providence succumbed to the charms of Mary Shelby.
"General McPherson had hardly located his camp when the attractions at the home at the head of the lake drew him thither--never did a noble Knight of ye olden time kneel with more earnest devotion at the feet of his lady love, than did the Commander of the 17th Corps bow at the shrine of Miss Shelby Blackburn."
flatboat. Willian E. Blackburn, an attorney, David Flournoy Blackburn and Henry B. Blackburn, both show land purchases.” NOT SURE WHERE THIS INFO CAME FROM (see EXTRAS Blackburn, David)

Blackburn, Julia (see BIOGRAPHIES: Schneider, William Henry & Fredericka)

Bliss, Mrs.
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Blockwood, Janie (see Hawkins, Janie Blockwood)

Bosworth, Felix
“The population of Ouachita Parish has increased to 5,120 by 1830 and in 1832 Carroll Parish was carved out of Ouachita Parish by the State Legislature. Felix Bosworth was the first judge and he held court in the home of Harbird Hood in Lake Providence, which had been designated as the parish seat of government.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

EARLY SETTLERS: “Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833. Felix Bosworth and Bartlett Milton Browder were listed as partners of law in Providence that year.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

CITIZENS WHO LET THEIR MARK: “Carroll Parish’s first Judge was Felix Bosworth, a young lawyer in his twenties. He was appointed to this position by the governor in 1832. Bosworth was married to Elizabeth Lester Bieller, and they had three children. Their home was Holly Place(now the site of the home of the Max Stockners). A toll bridge was located there to cross Tensas Bayou.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

THE JUDGE IS REMEMBERED: “In a letter written by Jacob Owen concerning a visit in 1840 and published in The Carroll Democrat, Jan. 24, 1892, Owen wrote of Judge Bosworth: “During my visit to the parish, there was a wedding at ‘Arlington’ which worthy of mention.” (see also STORIES BY THE LOCAL FOLK: Felix Bosworth & the Wedding at Arlington)

At “Find a Grave” this is what I found on Major Felix Bosworth:
Death: Jun. 9, 1847
Veracruz-Llave, Mexico 
Died at age 38 while serving in the Mexican War.


EMAIL:
Subject: Re: Felix Bosworth
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 17:50:13 -0500
From: "J.Johnson"
To: "sschmitz"
“Let me tell you a little about what you found....you found David Bosworth who I had no idea was in LA. He is Sarah's brother from KY. You found out that Ana Bosworth was born in GA....and that is quite a surprise and new fact. I suppose I need to head to GA before too long. You found Joseph Cox, a "relative" living in Sarah and her husband's household....indeed he IS a relative....Sarah's father had two wives and they were both Cox (I suspect sisters). I am not sure who Hugh Richardson is, but it helps to have the information because he may be one of the unknown males in Charles Richardson's household in the previous census. And the Bosworth marriage info. in Memphis, Tenn. has me really wondering....this week I found a Bosworth Civil War soldier who had enlisted at Memphis TN. The Blackburn death notice of the young daughter just about broke my heart and it is precious to have it in my family files.”
JEANNE

Pg. 133 had THREE Bosworth names on it for parish attorneys. B. F. Bosworth in 1840, Felix Bosworth in 1844, and W. Bosworth in 1847. There is a possibility that B. F. Bosworth is B. 'Felix' Bosworth I suppose, making B.F. Bosworth and Felix Bosworth the same person, but who is the W. Bosworth in 1847? Felix was a paymaster in the army by March 3, 1847 and had died June 9, 1847. The book states that Felix's sister was Sara E. Bosworth. I do have a Sara E. and she is the daughter of David Holcombe Bosworth of
KY, who was the uncle of my A.J. However, I do not have a brother of hers named Felix, so is this new information which has not been found before by other Bosworth researchers. I also see the name RICHARDSON. One of my Nashville Bosworths (this would be either a sister of A.J. or a cousin, depending on who his father is) married a RICHARDSON from LA. One of the David Holcombe's daughters married Charles B. Richardson, according to my records, so this matches with the book. Makes sense that Felix may be David's son. Then I see the name GOODRICH. The Goodrich family were
Neighbors and friends of the Bosworths in Nashville. A Nashville Goodrich married
a Nashville Bosworth. Then the name of MOSS. A. J.'s stepdaughter married a Charles
MOSS in Nashville." JEANNE

Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 06:56:07 -0400
CC: "Mom**"
“We know that a Sara Bosworth married a Richardson (Felix Bosworth was the host for the marriage and possibly the person officiating) but know little else about Sara. After Felix died, his widow married Henry B. Blackburn, a physician there in Carroll.”
However, what became of the children, Ana and Felis (Felix?) after 1850? I do not believe Henry is in the 1860 census and I believe I may have found another marriage for him in Kentucky: Dr. H.B. Blackburn, of Lake Providence, La., to Miss Mary C., daughter of Joseph Bryan, of Fayette County, Ky. M. Oct. 17, 1854.” JEANNE

Bradley, John

Boughton, Benjamin

Bonner, Nell Catherine & Nelson, Eleanor
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Both are a capable team of accountants” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Brannum, William Anthony
William Anthony Brannum lived in Lake Providence from 1896 - 1943. He was an insurance salesman and later founded his own business, Brannum Funeral Home. He attended Tuskegee Institute and a school of embalming. He was active in civic, church and professional groups.
W. A. Brannum and Elizabeth Hearns were married in Lake Providence, and their three daughters are Albertine, Martha, and Elizabeth. When W. A. died, his energetic wife assumed the management of the funeral home and a grocery store. She was active in civic affairs, and in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The oldest daughter, Dr. Albertine B. Hayes, received a doctorate from the University of OK. She has served as teacher, principal, supervisor, lecturer, visiting professor, and is now Assistant Superintendent in Caddo Parish. She has written many professional articles and has received many awards, including that of “Educator of the Year” in Caddo for 1969. Her husband, James T. Hayes, is a local businessman and Deputy Sheriff. She too, rose in educational circles from teacher to principal to Parish Supervisor. Martha listed in Who’s Who of American Women )(1968, 1970) and Outstanding Personalities of the South (1970). She holds a Master of Arts degree and has 51 hrs. beyond that degree.
The third daughter is Elizabeth “Liz” who married General T. Trass, Jr.,(see Trass, Mrs. General T., Jr.)
A street east of Gould Blvd. bears the name Brannum in recognition of the family.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bridges, ?

Briggs, Henry De Lois
“Henry De Lois Briggs was born in New York in 1835, came to New Orleans as a young man, and then came to Floyd in the 1840’s. He first taught school in Floyd, then went into the mercantile business. He is the paternal grandfather of Mrs. Dee Briggs Williams of Oak Grove. Mrs. Williams says her maternal grandparent were Darrell and Mary Ann Landfair Wright, the latter being from Baton Rouge. They came to the east banks of the Macon River before the Civil War. Mrs. Williams’ mother was Sara Elizabeth Wright, born and reared on a plantation across the Macon River near Poverty Point. Their home was destroyed by the Yankees during the Civil War. The family fled to Texas as so man others did during this time. They never returned, and Mrs. Williams said she never knew what became of their land.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

“Soldiers, who had left the area to fight, began to come home, some maimed, others ill, and all damaged by the horrors of war, lack of food, & clothing. Many did not come home. Two who did not return were Asbury Cawthorn and John McIntyre. One who did return was Henry De Los Briggs. He had been a merchant and school teacher before going to war; however, soon after returning, he decided to change his occupation. He married in Floyd in 1871 and moved to land he had acquired northeast of the present site of Forest. Here he build a home, owned a farm, built a school house, cotton gin and general mercantile store, and helped restore the South as others did.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Brock, Joseph Lawrence & Edna Bishop
BIOGRAPHIES: “In 1942, Joseph L. Brock, Sr., came to East Carroll from Franklin Parish. He was born on May 29, 1920, the son of Henry Joseph Brock and the former Lillie Vera Young, Mr. Brock married Norris Williamson on January 1, 1943, and two children were born of this marriage, Joseph Lawrence, Jr., “Larry“ on December 15, 1943, and Sally Elizabeth on Oct. 14, 1947. In 1948, Norris Brock died. On Oct. 14, 1953, Mr. Brock married Edna Aurelia Bishop.
Mr. Brock is a former teacher in the East Carroll Parish School system and a Senior Field Officer with the Production Marketing Association. He and his son are engaged in the production of cotton and soybeans in E. C. and Franklin Parishes. Sally Brock married Jeffery Ealand Turner on Aug. 24, 1968, and lives in Stonewall, La.
Born in 1884, Mr. Bishop came to East Carroll in 1925, and took up farming. He is remembered for his service to the parish as a member of the Police Jury from 1940 to 1956, serving as President from 1952 to 1956. Mr. Bishop died on Feb. 16, 1960, and Mrs. Bishop resides in the Monticello community.
From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brock, Edna Bishop
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Edna Bishop Brock is Clerk of Court. She is efficient and helpful.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
"Edna Brock, born in 1884, is the daughter of George Poole Bishop and the former Eva Blanche Amos. On Oct. 14, 1953, Edna Aurelia Bishop married. Mr. Joseph Lawrence Brock. Edna Brock first began work in the Clerk of Court‘s office in Dec. 1944, and she was elected Clerk on May 29, 1952, a post she has held continuously since that date. In 1973, she was named Clerk of the Quarter by the Louisiana Clerk of Court‘s Association.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Browder, Bartlett Milton
EARLY SETTLERS: “Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833. Felix Bosworth and Bartlett Milton Browder were listed as partners of law in Providence that year.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Amanda
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the Afrocan Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
Brown, E. Wayles
“A firm of attorneys that ranks among the ablest in Louisiana is that of E. W. and P. N. Browne of Shreveport. The senior partner has been in practice twenty years, is a native of Louisiana and a former member of the State Senate. Mr. Browne also has offices in New Orleans, where he is associated with Mr. W. A. Porteous. Jr. E. Wayles Browne was horn at Lake Providence in East Carroll Parish in 1879, son of Benjamin F. and Ella (Eppes) Browne. His father was born in Alabama, and from that state moved to East Carroll Parish after the Civil war. The maternal grand father of E. Wayles Browne was John Wayles Eppes, a prominent early citizen of what was then Carroll Parish where he located in the early '40s and became a slave owner and extensive planter. E. Wayles Browne was liberally educated, taking his academic course in the Louisiana State University, and his law course in Tulane University. He was graduated with the LL. B. degree in 1904, and after his admission to the bar, practiced at Lake Providence, his native town, but since May, 1906, has had his home in Shreveport. His brother and partner is Percy N. Browne, and their law offices are at the Slattery Building. Mr. Browne was elected a member of the House of Representatives of the State Legislature in 1917 to till the unexpired term of J. McW. Ford, and he was a member of the session of 1918. He was elected to the State Senate without opposition, serving in the sessions of 1920 and 1922. In both branches of the Legislature his influence and work were notable, and his name is associated with many of the beneficial laws enacted during those years. He was the father and secured the passage of the Abatement Act, popularly known as the Injunction Act, a war measure, and he also sponsored and secured the passage of the Carbon Black Act and the Building Lien Law. Mr. Browne is affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and is a member of the Civitan Club. He married Miss Grace Hall Long. Her father, the late B. W. Long, of Marshall, Texas, was for a number of years clerk of the courts of Harrison County in that state. They have two children: E. Wayles Browne, Jr., now fifteen years of age, who will graduate in 1925 from the Shreveport high school, and Grace, aged twelve years. Mr. Browne is a member of the American Bar Association and the Louisiana State Bar Associations and has held offices in both of these organizations. NOTE: The referenced source contains a black and white photograph of the subject with his/her autograph. A History of Louisiana, (vol. 2), p. 68, by Henry E. Chambers. Published by The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, 1925.”
E. Carroll, then Caddo Parish, Louisiana Submitted by Mike Miller 8/01
Submitted to the LAGenWeb Archives Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/la/lafiles.htm

Brown, Joane (see BIOGRAPHIES: Rushing, W. P.)

Browne, Percy Newby of E. Carroll Parish, LA. Submitted by Mike Miller 8/01 Submitted to the LAGenWeb Archives Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/la/lafiles.htm
“Percy Newby Browne, lawyer, with offices in the Slattery Building at Shreveport, has enjoyed many congenial and useful relations with his community in his profession and through various civic and social organizations. Mr. Browne was born at Lake Providence, Louisiana, son of Benjamin F. and Laura Ella (Eppes) Browne. His great-grandfather on both sides participated in the Revolutionary war. His paternal grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812, being an officer under General Scott on the campaign against the Creek Indians in 1837. Benjamin Browne, now eighty-three years of age is a veteran of the Civil war, having entered the Confederate army at the age of eighteen. He fought under Lee in Virginia as an artilleryman until wounded at second battle of Fredericksburg, after which he was commissioned and assigned special duty in Alabama in the enlistment department. Laura Ella Eppes, mother of P. N. Browne, was born at Eppes, Louisiana, near Delhi, daughter of Dr. John Wayles Eppes, and granddaughter of James B. Eppes of the distinguished Eppes family of Virginia. A daughter of John and Martha Wayles, Martha Wayles, married John Skelton, and after his death she became the wife of Thomas Jefferson, the great Virginia statesman. Percy N. Browne was educated in grammar and high schools, took special work in Columbia University at New York, and after his admission to the bar engaged in practice, being now a member of the law firm, E. W. and P. N. Browne. This firm handles a large general law business and acts as attorney for the American National Bank of Shreveport and for various insurance companies. Mr. Browne, though past draft age at the outbreak of the World war, volunteered as a private, and had been ordered to the Field Artillery Training Camp at Camp Taylor at Louisville, Kentucky,. at the time of the armistice. He is a democrat, a member of the Masonic Order, belongs to the Shreveport City Chub, is a charter member of McFarland Post No. 14 of the American Legion at Shreveport, and Shreveport Voiture of Las Societe National Des 40 Hommes Et 8 Chevaux; he belongs to the Isaac Walton League of America, the Shreveport Chamber of Commerce, the Louisiana Bar Association and is a member of the Board of Stewards of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Shreveport, and was one of the organizers of the Four Square Bible Class which has a membership of over one thousand. Mr. Browne married at Shreveport, June 15, 1920, Miss Honora Palmer, who was born in Shreveport, July 16, 1899, daughter of the late Sterling and Leola (Scott) Palmer, and grand-daughter of Doctor J. J. Scott, a prominent pioneer of Shreveport, who settled in that city shortly after the Civil war and was influentially identified with many phases of the early history of northwestern Louisiana. Mrs. Browne has two brothers, who were soldiers in the World war, Eugene Palmer and Sterling Palmer. Eugene Palmer was overseas a year, being at the front at the time of the armistice. Mrs. Browne is a member of the Shreveport Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and the present recording secretary of the chapter. She is a member of the Woman's Department Club of Shreveport, and the First Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Browne have one daughter, Eugenia Scott Browne, born September 6, 1921, at Shreveport.”
A History of Louisiana, (vol. 2), pp. 318-319, by Henry E. Chambers. Published by The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, 1925.

Brown, Virginia (see BIOGRAPHIES: Ragland, William Betron)

Bruit, Mrs.
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Buchanan, W. C.
“There was not much “taking” between the rivers, but occasionally there was a freight wagon or individual robbed and these incidents were unpunished. One night a freight wagon coming from Delhi to Floyd had stopped and choice bits of freight lifted by robbers, one being a case of whiskey belonging to W. C. Buchanan, a merchant in Floyd. Now, Mr. “Buck“ was a friend of the James and Younger brothers. The wagon arrived in Floyd that night and the driver found Mr. Buck waiting for his freight. He told him what happened, but there was nothing for Mr. Buck could do but go to bed and wonder who did it. The next morning when he opened his store, there on the porch was his case of whiskey. Then he knew who the bandits were. When they found the case of whiskey belonged to their friend, they found a way to deliver it to him.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Buck, John L.
EARLY SETTLERS: “John L. Buck in 1826 owned Pecan Grove Plantation which he purchased from the U. S. Government.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bullen, David

Bullen, Joseph S.

Bunch, Captain (pirate)
“The first we know of the white man to the east of us comes by way of history. Williamson’s History of Northeast Louisiana tells us of the episodes of a gang of pirates operating on the Mississippi River in the late 1700’s in the area of what is now Lake Providence. These pirates were led by a Captain Bunch, later being joined by a group of cut throats run out of Kentucky whose leader was Samuel Mason. So successful were these pirates in harassing river traffic that boatmen, who successfully evaded them and made it safely past the bend in the river, thanked providence for their delivery. Later, they began to call the place Providence. Historians say the Macon River received its name from the pirate, Samuel Mason.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Bunley, Elias
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the Afrocan Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Burr, Aaron

Burrus, George
War’s End: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Burton, James Ed
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “James E. Burton was Supervisor of Registration about 1875.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Byerley, Frank
BIOGRAPHIES: “Frank Byerley has had one of the most colorful and varied careers of any resident. He was a World War I veteran, a pilot for a newspaper, a farmer, and for 20 yrs was Secretary-Treasurer of the E. C. Parish Police Jury. Frank came from Mississippi with his parents. He was tutored privately by Mrs. J. C. Purdy, Sr., and graduated from the University of the South at Sewanee, TN, where he majored in science. He was President of his graduating class.
He learned to fly at Scott Field, Belleville, Illinois, while in the service. After graduating from Sewanee, Frank became a pilot for the Detroit News, flying writers and photographers all over this country and Alaska to cover the news. Byerley later flew an auto-gyro and demonstrated it at air shows. His associates during these years included; Amelia Earhart, Jimmy Doolittle, and Wylie Post. Frank returned to L. P. around 1920 to care for his mother and her farming interests. He also became head football coach at the local high school. (see also SPORTS: 1921 High School Football Team)
Frank Byerley served as Clerk of the Police Jury from 1944 until 1965. He established an airport at Lake Providence, known as Byerley Airport. (see also LOCAL STORIES: Grounded by the President of the U. S.) From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.


Byrd, J. T.
Volume 1 B. page 209 , Pvt. Co. A. 13th Battalion La. (Partisan Rangers). En. Lake Providence, La., Oct. 8th, 1862. Present on all Rolls from Nov., 1862, to Apr., 1863

Cain, Dr. Frank Arbuthnot“Find A Grave” website:
He was born on Dec. 15, 1914 and died on Jan. 28, 2007. He is preceded in death by his parents: Gordon Dunn Cain , Ola Arbuthnot Cain, and step-mother, Ruth Finklea Cain.Dr. Cain is survived by his wife: Katherine Cain of Lake Providence, Louisiana; son: Frank Arbuthnot Cain Jr. & wife Ann of Brandon, Mississippi; daughter: Kathy Brandt & husband Chris of Magnolia, Texas; son: Gordon R. Cain & wife Kathy of Mandeville, Louisiana; 8 Grandchildren & 4 Great-Grandchildren

Cammack, Abner Sam, Jr.
“Dr. Abner Sam Commack (1872-1950) was a third generation citizen of Coahoma Co., Mississippi. Dr. Cammack received a degree from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1899. In 1900, he married Emmie Walton (1879-1950). Both branches of her family had also moved to Coahoma County early 1800 to homestead and purchase land.
3 children born to this union: Elizabeth, 1901; Valera, 1903, and Abner Sam, Jr., Abner Sam Cammack, Jr., and his wife, the former Evelyn Barrow, came to East Carroll in 1932. They bought land on the Holand Delta Road in Oct. 1936, and lived there a number of years. Three children were born to them: Nancy, George, and Abner Sam, III. They later sold their land and moved to Columbus, Miss., where they had purchased a cattle farm, Mr. & Mrs. Cammack returned to E. C. in 1967. Evelyn was employed as Parish Librarian from 1967 to 1973.1905.
Nancy returned to the parish for a period with her husband, L. F. Swoope, Jr., who was employed as Associate County Agent from Oct. 1958 to Oct. 1965.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Dr. Abner Sam Sr.
BIOGRAPHIES: “Dr. Abner Sam Commack (1872-1950) was a third generation citizen of Coahoma Co., Mississippi. Dr. Cammack received a degree from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1899. In 1900, he married Emmie Walton (1879-1950). Both branches of her family had also moved to Coahoma County early 1800 to homestead and purchase land.
3 children born to this union: Elizabeth, 1901; Valera, 1903, and Abner Sam, Jr., 1905.
After suffering reverses during the early part of the depression Dr. & Mrs. Cammack moved to East Carroll Parish in 1932. He managed Lake View Plantation at the head of the lake until it was sold to the Farm Security Administration as a government project." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Elizabeth“Dr. Abner Sam Commack (1872-1950) was a third generation citizen of Coahoma Co., Mississippi. Dr. Cammack received a degree from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1899. In 1900, he married Emmie Walton (1879-1950). Both branches of her family had also moved to Coahoma County early 1800 to homestead and purchase land.
3 children born to this union: Elizabeth, 1901; Valera, 1903, and Abner Sam, Jr., 1905.
"Elizabeth graduated from Mississippi State College for Women in 1925 and taught in the schools of Mississippi. Later she graduated from the Library School of the University of Illinois. After working one year in Memphis Cossett Library, she was employed by the Louisiana State Library as a library demonstrator. Elizabeth directed six parish demonstration libraries (included E. C.). She came to East Carroll in 1954 to head the new demonstration library here. After the Police jury voted the tax to continue the library, she was named head librarian and served until her retirement in 1966.
In March 1938, Elizabeth and Valera Cammack purchased the former Crump place on Holand Delta Road and the family has lived there since." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Valera
“Dr. Abner Sam Commack (1872-1950) was a third generation citizen of Coahoma Co., Mississippi. Dr. Cammack received a degree from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1899. In 1900, he married Emmie Walton (1879-1950). Both branches of her family had also moved to Coahoma County early 1800 to homestead and purchase land.
3 children born to this union: Elizabeth, 1901; Valera, 1903, and Abner Sam, Jr., 1905.
Valera Cammack received a B. S. Degree from Mississippi State College for Women in 1926. She taught school for 1 year and worked in Chicago, Illinois for 4 years. In 1933, she became a field Worker with the Emergency Relief Administration in E. C. and continued in the field of social work for the remainder of her career. From 1939-1945, she worked with the Red Cross in Lake Charles, La., and in Atlanta, GA, with the Dept of Public Welfare in Avoyelles Parish as supervisor, and in Grant Parish as Director. In 1945 she returned to E. C. to be Director of the Dept of Public Welfare and remained in this capacity until she retired in 1967.
In March 1938, Elizabeth and Valera Cammack purchased the former Crump place on Holand Delta Road and the family has lived there since." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Carnahan, William

Carroll, ?

Castleman, D. F.

Cawthorns
“We find land transactions recorded in the Clerk of Courts Office in Oak Grove which show that settlers were coming to this part of the country early in the 1800s. In old Book A., page 119, we find this recording, ‘Abram Eddins sold to Peter Alexander a portion of Section 18 T 20, NR10E, being the same land Lafayette Moore and his wife sold to Eddins on June 11, 1812 and recorded in Book, folio 113.’ Descendants of the Moores are with us today, also the Cawthorns.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorns to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Cawthorn, Asbury
“Soldiers, who had left the area to fight, began to come home, some maimed, others ill, and all damaged by the horrors of war, lack of food, & clothing. Many did not come home. Two who did not return were Asbury Cawthorn and John McIntyre. One who did return was Henry De Los Briggs. He had been a merchant and school teacher before going to war; however, soon after returning, he decided to change his occupation. He married in Floyd in 1871 and moved to land he had acquired northeast of the present site of Forest. Here he build a home, owned a farm, built a school house, cotton gin and general mercantile store, and helped restore the South as others did.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Cawthorn, Jim & Chersley (brothers)

Cawthorn, Lud

FAMILY TREE:
Chambliss, Thomas L.
Peter Chambliss and Mary Rutledge had 7 children: (1)Mary Chambliss, married Jenkin Shelby March 31, 1831 in Ouachita Parish, LA. (2) Nathaniel Chambliss, born in Jefferson County, MS. He married 1st, Martha Ledbetter. His 2nd wife was Catherine Gardner November 30, 1826 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. He married his 3rd wife, Caroline Hale on May 13, 1838 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. (3) Sallie Chambliss. (4) Thomas L. Chambliss, born in Jefferson County, MS.; He married Caroline Davidson July 09, 1835 in Lake Providence, Carroll, LA. Thomas L. died @ 1837 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. (5) Robert James Chambliss, born around 1800 in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. (see BIOGRAPHY: Chambliss, Robert J.) He married Lucinda Hood January 15, 1835 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. (6) Martha D. Chambliss, born @ 1808 in Fayette, Jefferson, MS; died around 1884 in Ben Franklin, Delta, Texas. (7) Samuel Lee Chambliss, born April 09, 1814 in Jefferson County, MS. He died @ 1879 in Navarro Co., Texas. He married Jane Truett Scott in Jefferson County, Mississippi.

Chambliss, Martha D. was born about 1808 in Fayette, Jefferson Co., MS, and she married She married Augustus Cook November 11, 1826 in Fayette, Jefferson, MS. She and Augustus had one child, William A. Cook, born about 1828. Her 2nd husband was Thomas T. Bell, married on April 20, 1837 in Lake Providence, Carroll, LA, son of John & Nancy Bell. He was born March 22, 1808 in Kentucky and died about 1873 in Ben Franklin, Delta, Texas.
Thomas Bell and Martha’s children: (1)Julia Hooks Bell, born August 10, 1839 in L. P., Carroll, Louisiana; died February 03, 1910 in Leonard, Fannin Co., Texas. She married James Monroe Rigney on July 20, 1856 in Liberty, Casey, Kentucky; born February 12, 1835 in Liberty, Casey, Kentucky; died November 19, 1871 in Ben Franklin, Delta, Texas. (2)Thomas T. Bell, Jr., born @ 1841, (3) John G. Bell, born @ 1842, (4) Clark C. Bell, born @ 1843, (5) Samuel Lee Bell, was born @ 1851, and (6) Frederick C. Bell, born Jan. 1854 in Casey Co., KY. He married Mary C. Mynn January 23, 1971 in Ben Franklin, Delta, Texas.

Chambliss, Robert J.
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. (see BIOGRAPHY: Chambliss, Thomas L..)

Chaney, Jesse H.
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the SE of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1844 a mortgage was reported thus: ‘a cotton plantation situated on the east bank of L. P., Township 21, Rg. 12E, Lots 2-8 (902.73 acres), and buildings to be mortgaged for $48,000; improvements, 20 slaves, horses, cattle, 75 hogs, 50 bbl corn, household furniture and farming utensils -- all stand mortgaged to Jess H. Chaney & Charles H. Webb to secure the payment of 150 bales of cotton’.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Chandler, Julia Ann (see Hood, Harbird)

Cheek, Juanita
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Wife, mother, church worker and clubwoman.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Chewning, James J.
EARLY SETTLERS: “Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Claiborne, Leonard
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clay, Jackworth
A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. All office were filled with colored people, Cain Sartain was senator, followed by Jackworth Clay. Jim Gardener was representative for awhile.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Clement, T. I.
BIOGRAPHIES: “The parents of 12 children, T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement moved from Crowville to Madison Parish in 1929. They came to E. C. in the fall of 1933 to the Garden Home Community at Transylvania. Their children include: Joe Thomas married to Marie Anderson, a teacher in this parish for the past 36 years; Guy Cecil, who died at age 50 in 1958; Jessie Louis, who lives at Transylvania; Gladys, who lives in Hyattsville, Maryland; Oeina (Vaughters), living in Eudora; Annie, in Westminister, California--she was a navy nurse during World War II; John Wesley, a WW II casualty in 1945; LaFaye of Lake Providence; Ray, of L. P.; Julia (Ellis) and Lloyd LaBane, both of L.P., La.. Mr. & Mrs. T. I. Clement both died prior to 1971.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Lloyd LaBane
BIOGRAPHIES: “Lloyd, after graduation from high school, began work with the Louisiana Power and Light Company. When this company divided, he went with La. Gas Service and has worked for this company for 26 years. He is married to the former Thelma Parsons, a teacher in E. C. since 1955. Lloyd has also been a member of the Volunteer Fire Dept. and Fire Chief; a member of Rotary Club, life membership in the Junior Chamber of Commerce, and has been a member of the E. C. Parish School Board since 1966, serving as vice-president for 4 years.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clary, Duke G.

Clay, Jackworth (colored)

Cobb, Ida May
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Ida May is a secretary and then clerk of the Police Jury. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Volume 1 C. page 379
Cole, W. D. (also Cole, William D.), “Pvt. Co. A. 13th Battalion La. (Partisan Rangers). En. July 11th, 1862, Hamburg. Captured at Lake Providence, La., Feb. 10th, 1863. Recd. at Gratiot St. Military Prison, St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 21st, 1863. Forward from St. Louis, [p.379] Mo., toward Allen's Point, Va., for exchange, April 2nd, 1863. Recd. at City Point, Va., April 9th, 1863. Exchanged May 5th, 1863.” Found on the Computer Internet

Coleman, Genevieve
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “business career, homemaker” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Collier, Holt
Live Oaks Cemetery Mississippi Washington County, Greenville, Historically all African-American cemetery where former slave and bear hunt leader Holt Collier is buried. Public Spirituality; Cultural Diversity; history Onward Store, Smedes Plantation Historical marker at entrance of cemetery explains Collier's story. Holt Collier led the hunting expedition in which Teddy Roosevelt refused to shoot the bear, thus launching the creation of the teddy bear. Collier had trapped the bear for Roosevelt to shoot.
From Internet Research

Collins, William W.
“The first settlement in East Carroll in the early 19th century was on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Lake Providence, which then called Stock/Stack Island Lake. James Floyd claimed a section of land between the river and the lake, alleging that he had settle upon it in 1803. William Culfield and William Collins each claimed a section of land on the lake, their tracts adjoining Floyd‘s claim. They also dated their occupancy from the year 1803.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Cone, Peggy
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “manager of a chain of stores” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Conine, George W., who is actively and successfully engaged in merchandising, carries a stock of goods invoicing about $3,000 in his store at Arkansas Post. He was the second son of a family of seven children born to Richard and Jane (Bean) Conine, natives of Georgia and Louisiana, respectively. The father was born about 1808, of Irish descent. Going to Louisiana when a young man, he was there married, about 1838, and made his home the rest of his life, and at his death, in 1850, was one of the well-to-do planters of that State. Owing to unjust management of the estate, his widow and children were thrown upon their daily labor for sustenance. His wife died in 1858. She was a daughter of Rev. Christopher Bean, an Englishman by birth, who passed away in Louisiana, in 1852. George W. Conine was born in Carroll Parish, La., in 1844. He began making his own way in the world at the early age of seven years, being employed by Mr. Evin George (a wealthy farmer of that vicinity) to drive a team for his gin; afterward by James McNeal in the same community. At the age of fourteen he was employed as mail-carrier from Monroe to Lake Providence, La. In 1862 he joined the Carroll Dragoons of Louisiana Cavalry and was afterward transferred to Forrest's cavalry. He participated in the battles of Franklin, Vicksburg, the siege of Atlanta, Holly Springs and a number of hard fought battles. He was at home on furlough at the time of the surrender. He then engaged in farming in Louisiana until 1867, when he came to Arkansas, locating at Arkansas Post. He was married in 1872 to Miss Caroline Rogers, a native of this county and a daughter of one of the early settlers. She died in 1879, leaving two children: Willie D. and Johnie W. Conine. Mr. Conine was then married to Miss Ruby Conine, a consin of our subject, her father, Rev. Brittain Conine, being a brother of Richard Conine. She was born in the State of Alabama at Camp Hill where her mother, Jane Herren, died about 1854 and where her father, Rev. Brittain Conine, now resides and is a merchant of that place of forty or fifty years' standing, now being in his eightieth year. Ruby Conine is the mother of two children: Oscar and Hattie. Hattie died August [p.653] 25, 1889, aged three years, one month and thirteen days. Sleep thou in Jesus, little Hattie, till He bids thee arise. Mr. Conine continued farming until 1881, when he engaged in the mercantile business with his sister, Mrs. Mary A. Fogee, and since her death, in 1887, has continued the business himself, the firm being known as G. W. and B. B. Conine. He also owns about 1,000 acres of land in different tracts in this county, of which about 200 acres are under cultivation. He is a strong Democrat and a highly respected citizen. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church” Found on “The Computer Internet”

EMAIL: Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 23:23:47 EST Saconine@aol.com
“My ancestors who lived in Carroll Parish, lived there from about 1837 to 1865ish. My gr gr grandfather came to Carroll Parish from Putnam Co. GA., his name was Richard CONINE. Richard married Mariah J. BEAN, daughter of Rev. Christopher BEAN. Christopher BEAN had married in MS. to a lady named Martha LEDBETTER. Richard CONINE died about 1851, he's buried somewhere in what is now E. Carroll. Mariah J. (BEAN) CONINE died about 1860. Richard and Mariah had several children, those children were left orphaned after the death of Mariah. The children were taken in by a man named Joseph KENT, he was made their legal guardian. I know pretty much what happened to all of the children except the youngest one, named Martha CONINE. I believe Martha was probably only about 7 or 8 years old when her mother passed away. I have always wondered what happened to her. The other siblings left LA and went to
Southern AR. I believe there were others besides my CONINES that left LA and
went to S. AR. Families like, CHANEY, SCURLOCK, CHILDERS, can't think of any
more right now. SHEILA.

Conn, Callie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Negro home economics teacher” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Cooke, Sally (see BIOGRAPHIES: Norris Charlescraft Williamson)

Cook, William

Cooper, Cora Lee (see BIOGRAPHIES: Ragland, William Betron)

Corley, William J.

Craig, Norman
BIOGRAPHIES: “Engaged in towing vessels on the Miss. River is Norman Craig, founder of Carroll Towing Company. Various co-owners have sold their holding to Mr. Craig and he and his son, Paul Craig, of Oak Grove, La., have owned four large vessels ranging from 1800 to 3900 HP. Of Scotch ancestry, Mr. Craig came from Cincinnati to Oak Grove in West Carroll Parish in 1944 and then to L. P. in 1960. Mr. & Mrs. Craig live at Craig‘s Landing on the lake on Island Point. They are members of the First Presbyterian Church of which he is an elder. Their children and Norma and Paul. Paul is married to Patricia Wagley.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Culfield, William
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “The first settlement in East Carroll in the early 19th century was on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Lake Providence, which then called Stock/Stack Island Lake. James Floyd claimed a section of land between the river and the lake, alleging that he had settle upon it in 1803. William Culfield and William Collins each claimed a section of land on the lake, their tracts adjoining Floyd‘s claim. They also dated their occupancy from the year 1803. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Curry, Mrs. Abe
“Miss Kate Stone (writer of “Brokenburn” her diary) mentions Mrs. Elizabeth Savage going to Floyd frequently in 1862. I assumed the Savage Plantation was nearer the Macon River than most of the others. She said, ‘Mrs. Hardison was telling us of Mrs. Abe Curry’s trip on horseback to Floyd. She must be crazy.’ A footnote said this was fifty miles round trip and mentioned Floyd being the county seat of Carroll Parish. There were federal troops in this area trying to stir up trouble among the slaves which was the reason Miss Stone thought Mrs. Curry’s trip hazardous.”
“In another section Miss Stone says, ‘A letter today from Mrs. Hardison. They and the Currys expect to move into the neighborhood in a few days. She writes gloomily of affairs on the river. The Newmans and the Grays are the only families left out there. Mat Johnson, after being beaten by his negroes, has come out to Floyd with fifteen other men and trying to raise a company to drive out the marauding Yankees. If only those backwoodsmen from across the Macon River would come over and help us.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Curry, Elizabeth (see Beard, Mrs. Isham B.)

Curry, George M., M.D., a native of Dearborn County, Ind., was born April 3,1818. His parents were Elias and Lydia (Abraham) Curry. Elias Curry, a native of Pittsburgh, Pa., resided in Kentucky awhile, then moved to Indiana. He is a founder by trade, and is still living at Dillsborough, Ind. He is a son of James Curry, a native of Wales. Mrs. Lydia Curry was born in Cleveland, Ohio, a daughter of George Abraham, a native of England.
George M. Curry was reared in Aurora and Dillsborough, Ind., and educated at Moore's Hill Male and Female Institute and at Holbrook's Normal School, Lebanon, O., graduating from the former in 1867. He attended two full courses of medical lectures at the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, O., where he graduated with high honor in 1871. In 1872 he located at Owingsville, Ky., and practiced his profession until the fall of 1884, when he was engaged as assistant of Prof. W.W. Dawson, of the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati. He served in that capacity about nine months, when he returned to Owingsville, where he has since resided, making a specialty of surgery, having thoroughly equipped himself with all necessary instruments while in Cincinnati. May 30, 1872, the Doctor married Miss Lou A. Tichenor, of Lebanon, O., a daughter of David and Eliza (Williams) Tichenor. They are the parents of five children, three of whom still survive, viz: Clifford T., Nina and Edna P. Dr. and Mrs. Curry are members of the Presbyterian Church, as is also Clifford T. Dr. Curry is a Republican politically; he is an able physician and a gentleman who is highly respected by all who know him.
CURRY ABRAHAM DAWSON TICHENOR WILLIAMS
Dearborn-IN PA Wales OH Kentucky: A History of the State, Battle, Perrin, & Kniffin, ed. 8-B, 1887 Bath County, KY

Curry, William Cromartie
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 18:22:00 -0800
Marshall
“I am hoping there is an obituary for William Cromartie Currie, b. 17 June, 1810, died 2 October, 1876. He lived in Carroll Parish from about 1847 until his death, as far as I know, and is buried in Vicksburg along with lots of other Curries. William was a wealthy planter so I have always felt sure he would have had a write-up.
Emails concerning: CURRIE, ALEXANDER, RICHARDS, WHITAKER, CROMARTY
From: Marshall

"the Monticello Rifles roster you have Abe listed as "A. W. Cume."

Hello Sandy, I enjoyed visiting your Lake Providence page again and was tantalized by the list of plantation names and owners. I know my Currie ancestors were neighbors of the Stones and Valentines, etc. and have loved reading about them in Kate Stone's book. Do you have a source for the name and location of their place? I just would like to know. I have pulled in a little more Currie information but no definite leads yet as to where William came from or who his parents are. Still working on it, though, as if I could ever quit now!!
Thanks for your help, Leta
Hi Sandy,
For now I will tell you that I am most interested in finding out William Cromartie Currie's parents' names; family letters say his parents were Catherine Cromartie and William Currie, from Scotland (Edinburgh area) but I haven't been able to confirm this yet. I also would like to know what happened to Adeline Whitaker Currie, William's first wife; I think perhaps they lived in Madison City, MS., where their surviving children were born and she died there leaving Abe, between 10 and 12, and Huldah, between birth and 2 yrs old. Lots more to research here when I have time. Anyway, after that William Currie moved to Louisiana and married Hester Ann Richards and lived in Carroll. Other than tracking down living descendants I pretty much know what happened after that, it's further back that's giving me trouble.

Oh yeah, I do have a cousin who has some family papers and I'm hoping he has some photos to share. I'll let you know.

Here is what I found yesterday.
1870 Census of Carroll Parish
Craig & Stone Plantations
#1812
Richards, George m. 25, planter LA $5,000. $1,000.

#1813
Curry, W.C. m. 50, MS $8,000. $1,000.
, Ann f. 40 MS
, Howard m. 21, planter LA
, Haldar f. 20, LA
, Kate f. 15, LA
, Lela f. 12, LA
, Ann f. 8, LA

1880 Census of Carroll Parish

#505
Richard(s)?, A. w. m. 29, carpenter LA Switz.
Germ.
, Maggie w. f. 22, wife Scot.
Switz. Germ.
, Albert F. w. m. 4, son
LA LA Scot.
, Lousia w. f. 2, dau.
LA LA Scot.

No Curry/Curries

1890 of Carroll Parish
No Richards
No Curry/Curries

This is all I have for now. I will be continuing to look for Curries and
Richards stuff. I am still working on the plantation where-a-bouts.

*On my sister, Sherryls's Census reports. In 1860 Census it shows Valentines, Curries, and Stones listed under Pecan Grove Plantation, which was located in the Floyd area.
In 1870 it lists the Currys at Craig & Stone Plantations.
(Remember... these were handwritten reports from many years ago.)
Your friend,
Sandy

Hello Sandy,
When you have a little time, could you do me a humongous favor?
William Cromarty CURRIE died 2 October, 1876 in Carroll Parish and is buried in Vicksburg. He was a rich planter, at least before the war, so I figured his
obituary would be in the papers. Could you look and see? I am hoping to find out a little more about him and his background. I would appreciatethis so much.
Thanks for all the work you do on the website,
Leta Currie Marshall
p.s. by the way, William's parents were Alexander Currie and Loruhamah
Cromartie, don't know when they died but Alexander still shows up as
late as the 1840 Warren County census (spelled Curry, as it often was
then).
I wonder if this Joseph Curry you found is related. It's the right area,
but there was another William Curry in that area at the same time, not
necessarily related. I should put more energy into this family because
nobody else seems to be researching them. Many of my other lines are
pretty well documented or present fewer problems.
LETA

Davis, C. L.
STREETS AND ADDITIONS: “Davis Street was named for C. F. Davis, who inherited land in Providence in 1897 from his father, James L. Davis. Out of the land he formed the Davis Addition to the town.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Davis, Edward High & Julia (Blackburn)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Anna Mary (Nan) Davis was born on Tyrone Plantation, lived on Island Plantation and after her mother’s death was reared by her sister Catherine (Katie) Davis. She went to Jessamine Female Insitute in Nicholson, KY, then returned to keep house for her father on Belle Meade Plantation.
In 1899, while the Davises were living on Star Arlington Plantation, she and Frederick Hall Schneider were married. They took a honeymoon trip on the steamboat Bell of the Bends. Anna Mary (Nan) Davis was a decendant of Devotion Davis, Sr., a delegate from Pasquotank County to the colonial North Carolina Congress, became an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution.“ From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Davis, Issac

Davis, James L. (see Davis, C. F.)
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston


OBITUARY: newspaper



“One of the saddest occurrences that has taken place in our little town in many a day was the death of Mrs. Roxana Eppes Davis. This good lady passed away Monday, August 27, 1891, surrounded by her sorrowful children and almost brokenhearted husband. She had been sick only a few days, and Dr. Davis apprehended no danger until Monday morn, when her symptoms grew alarmingly worse. Her death was that of a Christian, she met death bravely and was conscious to the last. A congestive chill was the immediate cause of her death. Mrs. Davis was a Miss Eppes, and was a native of Mississippi. Her father, John Wailles Eppes, was a planter for many years in old Carroll Parish, living near Monticello. She came to Louisiana at the early age of nine years, and five or six years afterwards went to Kentucky, where she was educated. In 1862 she was married to Dr. J. L. Davis at her father’s residence near Monticello. With a few exceptions, the Doctor has been living here ever since, engaged in the medical profession. Mrs. Davis leaves behind two sisters, Mrs. Ben Brown, of this place; and Mrs. Ed Brown, who is now in Florida. She was a woman of the most truthful and religious character; and during her whole life, she was never known to tell a falsehood. She was a loving and affectionate mother, and a devoted wife of the noblest type. Her remains were taken to the Methodist Church and from thence to the Providence Cemetery, followed by sorrowing friends and relatives. “ L. P. newspaper

Davenport, Isaiah
“The Baron de Bastrop had promised as a part of his agreement when the king of Spain awarded him the two million acre land grant which included the present area of Morehouse and West Carroll Parishes, to bring in 500 settlers in an effort to colonize the area. He found himself slow in fulfilling this promise as settlers were reluctant to move inland away from the deep waterways. The hardships in getting supplies in and securing protection from Indians made it hard to attract settlers inland; so, the Baron de Bastrop decided to sell a portion of his grant, located on the west side of Boeuf River, to one Abram Morehouse.
Mr. Morehouse was an adventurer from Kentucky whom de Bastrop met in New Orleans. He immediately set up office in New Orleans to attract settlers to his new land. He offered them 400 arpents (acres) of land, tools for cultivation and supplies for three years. He found one Isaiah Davenport, who was interested in changing occupations and seized upon the opportunity to become a planter, the d, the dream of many at that time. Mr. Davenport had been a boat captain from Providence, Rhode Island, a seafaring man with a boat named ‘Cleopatra‘. He had been engaged in slave traffic catching young black males and females in Africa and bringing them to America for sale to the colonist. New Orleans was one port of entry.
Mr. Morehouse and Mr. Davenport came to the west bank of Boeuf River between the present site of Mer Rouge and Oak Ridge about 1797. They brought a few settlers with them and began establishing homes, each on his four hundred arpents of land awarded him by Baron de Bastrop. They looked to Fort Miro (now Monroe) for supplies and protection. For supplies and protection.
Fortunately, protection from the Indians was never needed. The few Indians here were friendly and helpful to the settlers, teaching them what they knew of boat making, planting, and raising crops acclimated to the area; brought a few slaves with them, but the masters worked along side the slaves in erecting crude homes, clearing and cultivating the land with what tools they had, always sharing with each other. In this way they eked out a simple livelihood in the early years.”
[Mr. C. C. Davenport, son of Isaiah Davenport, the original settler. Mr. Davenport wrote his memoirs in 1910 for the ‘Mer Rouge Democrat’ and now these articles have been put in booklet form, “Looking Backward‘] “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Davisson, Harriett (see Kerr, Joseph & Nancy)

Debro, Beatrice
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Negro leader in church activities and employee of school board.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Deeson, ?

DeFrance, Charles
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

NEWSPAPER OBITUARY: November 18, 1893
Judge Charles A. DeFrance, a well-known attorney and highly respected resident of Kirkwood, died suddenly in the County Court House at Clayton yesterday. He left Kirkwood on a Missouri Pacific train at 8 o’clock yesterday morning in company with Colonel Zack J. Mitchel, and went in the Union Deport, St. Louis, where they took a train to Clayton. He was attorney for Dr. Eugene Van Ness and others of Kirkwood, and went to Clayton to defend them in suits in the Circuit Court, instituted by the Kirkwood Armory Hall Association. While on the way from Kirkwood to Clayton he complained of weakness and chilly sensations. He arrived in Clayton about 10 o’clock, and a few minutes later started up to the Circuit Court room, which is on the second floor of the Court House. When about half up the stairway he appeared to be stricken with paralysis, and he avoided falling by holding to the side railing on the steps. Colonel Mitchel, who was with him assisted him into Prosecuting Attorney Mudd’s office and onto a sofa. Dr. Van Ness of Kirkwood and Dr. E. S. Rouse of Clayton were near and were promptly called to attend him, and they did all to their power to give him relief, but to no avail. He was in great agony until 12:30, when death relieved him. The attending physicians assigned him cerebral hemorrhage as the cause of death. Dr. J. W. Evans, his son-in-law with whom he lived in Kirkwood, was summoned to Clayton from his place of business with the Evans Bros. Tobacco & Warehouse Company in St. Louis, and he arrived about 12 o’clock. The old gentleman spoke only one sentence after he was stricken on the stairway, and this was about one hour before he died when he looked at Dr. Evans, his son-in-law, and said: “My daughter!” In the afternoon the remains were taken by a wagon from Clayton to the home of his only daughter, wife of Dr. J. W. Evans, in Northwest Kirkwood.
Judge Charles A. DeFrance was born at Port Gibson, Miss., in 1826. In 1867 he came to St. Louis, and resided here until 1879, when he moved to Kirkwood, where he resided until his death. He served a time in the Confederate Army and in the 1860‘s was District Judge in Mississippi. He filled the position of Town Recorder in Kirkwood several years and was prominently identified with all movements for the welfare of the town. About three years ago he was enrolled to the Circuit Court at Clayton as a member of the bar and since that time has spent much of his time in the courts of St. Louis County. He was an uncompromising Democrat and a faithful and indefatigable worker in his party, serving as a member of the County Central Committee.
He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Howard De France Evans of Kirkwood, and one son, William H. DeFrance, who is an engingeer on the Cotton Belt Railway and resides at Jonesboro, Arkansas.--[A St. Louis paper]
We can add to the above--that Judge DeFrance resided in this parish. For many years before and after the war. He was one of the foremost citizens both in the old parish of Carroll, & in the parish of East Carroll.
He was a good lawyer; and, in all the relations of life, a kind and genial gentleman. In this general demeanor, he was exceptionally courteous and polite, and had a heart as tender as a woman’s. He never was Judge in Mississippi, but was Judge of the parish of East Carroll, La. For several years, and filled the position creditable to himself, and wish satisfaction to the people.
He left many friends here. Those of them who survive will be sadly grieve to hear of his death.” BANNER-DEMOCRAT of East Carroll Parish, La.

Delony, Alice Stephens
BIOGRAPHIES: “Northeast Louisiana is proud to claim Alice Stephens Delony as one of the great heroines of the Civil War days and of the Reconstruction period.
Alice Stephens was born in Warren Co., Miss., on June 30, 1840. Her father, Tobias Stephens, bought land in the Goodrich Landing area in 1846, and brought his family to Carroll Parish. Alice married Edward James Delony on June 21, 1860. They made their home in Floyd, the parish seat of Carroll Parish, where Mr. Delony practiced law.
During the Civil War Mrs. Delony maintained their home while her husband served in the Confederate Army. Captain Delony was stationed at Vicksburg, commanding Co. A., 31st Regiment of the Louisiana Infantry. When he wrote home of the privations and sufferings of his men, his wife went into action. Mrs. Delony with the help of her neighbors, knitted socks and sweaters and sewed shirts, underwear and uniforms for the troops. She carefully packed the clothing and took a long and circuitous route to Monroe, Bayou Sara, Woodville, Clinton, and finally to Vicksburg. She sometime traveled by water, sometimes by land eventually arrived in Vicksburg, where the supplies were delivered.
The Delony‘s home was always open to Confederate soldiers and the wounded were cared for tenderly. The task of nursing was a labor of love for Mrs. Delony and for the women in Floyd.
At the close of the war, Captain Delony re-established his law practice in Floyd. With the division of Carroll Parish, he moved his law practice to Providence. He and his wife lived in the present Delony home on Lake Street.
6 children were born to Alice and Edward Delony. They were Anna Floretta, Alice Lucinda, Edward James, Thomas Henderson, Henry Goodrich, and Tobias Stephens (father of Vail Montgomery Delony).
A former neighbor recalls: “Mrs. Delony was slender, dainty, and soft-voiced. Always dressed simply, but in good taste, using the nicest of materials in her costumes. Her home was open always to friends--she had so many, for everyone loved her. The yard was pretty with its cedar-lined walk and lovely flowers“.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Delony, Bessie Louise
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “teacher, welfare visitor, supervisor, church worker” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Delony, Edward J.
BIOGRAPHIES: “E. J. Delony, who died in 1892 at age 56, had been a newspaper editor-publisher, a political party leader, an attorney-at-law, a soldier and District Judge. A published tribute said of him: “Young Delony had fearlessly and aggressively described the danger for the South (just after the Civil War)”; “the Union-loving Delony was among the first to shoulder his musket in defense of his beloved Southland“; “the Judge never failed all through his life to evince the courage of his convictions.”
The Banner Democrat of September 10, 1892, stated: “His legal attainments are luminous…. At the Bar and on the Bench he was the peer of very best…As a citizen, being naturally of an aggressive disposition, he was often found in advance of the times. In his fierce and fearless battles with the carpetbag element during the dark days of the reconstruction in this parish the true elements of his character and his noble efforts for the public good stood out in bold relief. He was a fast friend and a fearless enemy. He had a hand as open as day for melting charity.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember” (see Delony, Alice Stephens, wife of Edward J. Delony)

“E. J. was born in Talbot Co., Georgia, on the 10th day of July, in the year of our Lord, 1836. Dr. Delony, his father, moved to Louisiana with his family while the Judge was yet a stripling. He evinced from early life a literary tendency, being of a nervous sanguine temperament, his mind soon outstripped his physical strength. He came to old Carroll sometime before the memorable campaign that placed Abraham Lincoln in position of the Chief Magistracy of the Nation.
At Floyd, in the office of Hugh Short, we first made the acquaintance that soon ripened late intimacy to the then stirring times. The South was all ablaze with succession fires, and there were but few in this section then that had the nerve to peer through the conflagration and the smoke and gaze at the danger ahead. Hugh Short with his rugged eloquence fearlessly fought for the Union, and young Delony equally as fearless and aggressive with burning words of eloquence described the threatened danger to the South. We were with them in the “True Issue”, but it was all in vain, and when the storm and the tempest came, the same Union loving Delony was among the first to shoulder the musket in defense of his beloved Southland, while numbers of the loud-mouthed fire caters, who had denounced the Unionists, sneaked within the Federal lines.
We may here pertinently say that the Judge never failed all through life to evince the courage of his convictions.
The war over, he devoted himself like a good citizen to his family and his profession as Councilor and Attorney-at-Law. How well he succeeded is to a great extent a matter of history. His home devotion is seen in its happy surroundings. His legal attainments are luminous as a matter of public record. At the Bar and on the Bench he was the peer of the very best in the palmy days of the profession, and by his brilliant talent and solid acquirements he commanded the respect and admiration of his fellow practitioners far and near.” (see rest of story September 10, 1892 Banner Democrat)

Delony, Vail Montgomery
BIOGRAPHIES: “Vail Montgomery Delony was born into a family of public servants--for on both sides of his family were such men. His grandfather, Edward J. Delony, served as first Mayor of the Town of Providence in 1876, and then as Judge of the 8th Judicial District in 1880. Dr. Edward Delony, his great grandfather, served in the Senate of the State of Louisiana from East Feliciana Parish 1852. Judge John Wes Montgomery, his maternal great grandfather, was Judge of the Parish of Tensas, and later moved to Carroll Parish and became a law partner with J. E. Ransdell.
Vail Delony was first elected State Representative in 1940, and served in the House until his death in 1967. During these twenty-seven years, he was Chairman of the Committee on Transportation & Highways from 1948 through 1960. He was a member and then Chairman of the State Licensing Board for Contractors, a member of the Legislative Budget Committee, the Board of Liquidation of State Debt, the La. Office Building Corp., the State Bond & Building Comm. and many other boards and commissions. In May 1964, he was selected by the members of the House to serve as Speaker of the House of Representatives under the administration of Gov. John J. McKeithen. He presided with dignity and honor in this position until his death on Nov. 17, 1967.
Vail worked hard to improve the highway system and earned the nickname “Mr. Highways“. He helped establish a minimum salary schedule for teachers. As chairman of the joint legislative committee on Retirement he was instrumental in setting up the present state and local retirement systems for public employees.
In April 1958, the Police Jury Asso. of La. Honored Vail Delony by publicly citing him for “distinguished public service“ and expressed “appreciation of the many Legislative Acts sponsored for the benefit of Police Juries and citizens of La.
For his work in securing a port facility for E. C. Parish a resolution was adopted by the Port Comm. “gratefully acknowledging that his foresight, leadership, and counsel made this port a reality and we realize how much his demise means to us all.”
He was always interested in public libraries for the state and was instrumental in securing legislation beneficial to the La. State Library system.
With quiet forcefulness, sure knowledge and effective humor, Vail Delony achieved success with honor as he combined public service with a varied business career as a farmer and contractor. He was President of the North La. Federal Savings & Loan Asso., and served for many years as a Director of the Bank of Dixie. He was a vestryman of Grace Episcopal Church and on one of the church’s Minutemen to build a new church. He was an active member of the Sons of the American Revolution.
Vail Montgomery Delony was born in L. P., La. On Jan. 5, 1901. His parents were Helen Montgomery Delony and Tobias Stephens Delony. He grew up and lived in L. P. all of his life. On Dec. 26, 1926, he married Elizabeth Louise Miller of Greenville, Miss. They had 2 daughters, Elizabeth Delony Reed and Vail Delony Baldridge. His four granddaughters are Elizabeth Vail Reed, and Kathryn, Elizabeth and Mary Sue Baldridge.
On March 25, 1968, Gov. John J. McKeithen dedicated the Vail M. Delony Data Processing Center of the La. Dept of Public Safety in Baton Rouge. Mrs. Delony and her daughters attended the ceremonies. Vail Delony had been a tireless and effective supporter of all efforts which would bring better law enforcement to Louisiana..” Georgia Pinkston’s “A Place to Remember” (see also Delony, Alice Stephens, Delony, Edward J.)

DeSantos, Miguel
“EARLY SETTLERS: Another certificate of ownership, numbered 25 and recorded in a local coveyance record (Book B., page 397), indicated that Miguel de Santo was given a tract of land in 1788 consisting of 40 arpents front by 40 arpents deep, situated on the Bayou Macon in the post of Ouachita. .“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Dempsey
“We have no record of a permanent settlement in this area (Lake Providence) prior to 1803 at which time the Federal Government purchased the Louisiana Territory from France. However, we have seen by LaSalle’s journey down the river and other evidence, that traders and missionaries were in the area long before this. No doubt a trading post, maybe small, had been in or near the present site of Lake Providence for some time . Legend has it that a family by the name of Dempsey lived ion the lake in the late 1700’s. They lived in a wigwam, had a cow, farmed, hunted, and traded. This name appears later in the area which became known as Ward Two of West Carroll Parish. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Dempsey, Joe
“EARLY SETTLEMENTS: John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

“TOWN OF PROVIDENCE: The first settlers searched no further, but made their homes here. The first settlement consisted of ‘mud house along the river front’ and a family named Dempsey is said to be the first permanent settler. From a Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Dempsey, Charles & Rachel

Dickerson, Bill
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Doles, W. A.

Donahue, ?
EARLY BUSINESS OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, LA.: Lake Providence has always been the seat of government for the parish, except from 1855 to 1870, when, as a part of the parish of Carroll, the seat was moved to Floyd (now West Carroll). Some of the business house and churches of the early town mentioned in old newspapers are: (1848-1881) Donohue & Bernard. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Dorsey, Willie (see BIOGRAPHIES: Banks, Leandrew)

Downs, ?

Draughon, John
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Drew, Emanuel C.
Emanuel C. Drew is an intelligent, enterprising and successful young "knight of the scissors," and is now ably editing the Louisiana Advance, one of the spiciest, breeziest journals of this section of the State. He was born in Carroll Parish, La., November 1, 1858, being the youngest of three sons, the other two members of the family being Robert H., who is a resident of Black Hawk Landing, and is superintendent of a large cotton plantation, and Judge Larche C., who resides in Calhoun, Ouachita Parish, La., being the editor and proprietor of the Experimental Farmer, a well known agricultural paper. Their father, Capt. Newit J. Drew, was a native Louisiana, born in 1831, and was a distinguished soldier during the secession, being captain of Drew's battery of light artillery, well known in the Trans Mississippi Department. He received the best advantages in his youth, being educated under private tutors at first, afterward entering the university at Baton Rouge, and his wife, Ann Chaney, who was born in Carroll Parish, La, in 1834, was educated in Jackson, La., then the Athens of the State. Both parents are still living in the enjoyment of fairly good health.
Emanuel C. Drew's early education was perfected at home by his mother, who thoroughly grounded him in the common branches and taught him the principles
of business. When he had attained his seventeenth year he began the battle of life for himself as a salesman in a general mercantile establishment, and there he remained until twenty years of age.
In the month of December, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura Smith,a native of Ouachita Parish, La., whose birth occurred in 1860. She was educated principally in Alabama, but her parents were Georgians and her father a cotton planter. Mrs. Drew is a lady of remarkable business tact and acumen, and gives much, valuable aid to her husband in the work of editing the Advance, her excellent address, affable and industrious disposition being cardinal elements of their success.
Mr. Drew began his journalistic career in Minden, La., as editor and proprietor of the Minden Democrat, which he managed successfully through a heated campaign of one year. At the end of that time he purchased the new paper known as the Louisiana Advance, which at that time (1884) had only an eight-quire circulation, but by unflagging energy and Mrs. Drew's fidelity to her husband's interest, the circulation was increased to forty-one quires within one year from date of purchase, besides a large and lucrative job work.
Mr. Drew has always been a true Democrat of the Jeffersonian type, in which he followed in the footsteps of his ancestors, and he has ever taken an active part in local politics, being a stanch, eloquent and able advocate of the principles of his party, and all measures which he considers right and just.
He is justly proud that he is able to say that no Drew of his family ever scratched a Democratic ticket. He has never been an officer of any grade, has never aspired to be, being content to use his influence in electing to office those whom he considers more suitable men. He deserves the highest commendation from his country men generally, regardless of politics, for the active and very intelligent manner in which he advertised the northern part of the State, and is now secretary of the North Louisiana Immigration
Association. The energy with which he has pushed matters has been remarkable for a man of his years, and the good his work has done is almost untold. He has sent authentically compiled literature to all pars of the Union, and many have become interested in the beauty and richness of Northern Louisiana. Mr.Drew has been district land agent for the V.S. & P.R.R. for four years, and has performed a vast amount of business for them, the accuracy with which every detail has been attended to, stamping him as a man of fine executive ability, persistency and determination. His work for this parish has been most exemplary in every particular, which is a source of great satisfaction to him. He is a member of the K. of P. of Ruston, La., and he and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church at Arcadia, La. They are well established in life, and have a sufficient amount of this world's goods to make them comfortable and happy, and expect to make their home in Northern Louisiana, where a bright and successful future is awaiting many a home seeker. Mr. Drew is secretary of the Louisiana Sate Land Company, and is also agent for a large land owner of Illinois, and withal, conducts the largest land business in the northern part of the State.
Source: Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northwest Louisiana
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/la/lafiles.htm

Dreyfuss, Solomon [Honorable]
OBITUARY:
“Solomon was born on the 1st of January, 1830, in the town of Casel, in the Province of the Grand Dukedom of Hessen Darnistadt, of Germany, situated on the river Rhine. When 13 years old he adopted the trade of a tailor, and at the age of 18, commenced traveling all over Germany, working at his trade in some of the largest towns of the Empire. In Jan, 1866 , about two years after the death of his father, in company with two brothers, his mother and sister, he sailed from Liverpool to New Orleans, where they all lived, and where he last a brother in Aug. 1867 during the yellow fever epidemic. In 1873, he moved to Lake Providence, La., with his mother and sister to join his brother Dave, who had lived there ever since 1869. From that time on, he followed his profession. In 1882, he went into the mercantile business with his brother Dave, who, by thrift and industry, built up a good trade. Mr. Dreyfuss was a valuable citizen. As a public officer he discharged his duties faithfully and honorably; as a private citizen he was upright, peaceable, and high-minded. He was always heard of in the highest terms; and this is the greatest encomium which any man can receive--mainly, the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. He had been unwell for a month or so, but not dangerously. The family felt no uneasiness about him and it was not until they were called to his death bed, that they ever dreamed of a fatal termination. In fifteen minutes after they were called up, he was dead. He had been suffering with his heart, and was taken off in a fit of apoplexy. His remains were taken to Vicksburg, and buried with the rites of his people, Rabbi H. M. Bien performed the ceremony.” L. P. NEWSPAPER

Dunn, Mrs. Marian (see BIOGRAHIES: Pittman Brothers)

Dunn Family
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 13:24:20 -0330
From: Kimberly Nolan

“My grandmothers maiden name is Dunn. My family is black her mother my great grandmother either was a slave or was born right after slavery I am trying to see where the name derived from and if their were any plantation owners by the name of Dunn in that area. My great -great grandparents last name was Straighter. “
“My grandmother was born, as we know, in Millikin, La or East Carroll Parish her name then was Alice Dunn her mother's name was Frances Straughter or (Strawter) we are unsure of the spelling. My ancestors may have resided at Panola Plantation and Millikin plantation. As for Sarah Stroughter was she black or white?.” KIMBERLY

Durrell, A.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Dutton, Alice ( see BIOGRAPHIES: Amacker, Robert)

Eady, John

Eddins, Abram
“We find land transactions recorded in the Clerk of Courts Office in Oak Grove which show that settlers were coming to this part of the country early in the 1800s. In old Book A., page 119, we find this recording, ‘Abram Eddins sold to Peter Alexander a portion of Section 18 T 20, NR10E, being the same land Lafayette Moore and his wife sold to Eddins on June 11, 1812 and recorded in Book, folio 113.’ Descendants of the Moores are with us today, also the Cawthorns.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: The Ouantrill/Quantrell Gang, as the guerrillas were known, came into the area between the rivers for two reasons. First, the isolation and vast swamps, which made pursuit dangerous; the second , the Younger and James Brothers, who were members of the gang, had relatives in this region. Cole Younger’s daughter married Captain Jaret, and they lived on the Eddins place south of the Bayou Macon Church and a sister of the James Brothers lived near Delhi. They were welcome in this area for their help, especially in organizing and drilling the Home Guard. “ From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Edmond, Frank

Edmondson, Frank & Opal
BIOGRAPHIES: “Frank & Opal Edmondson moved to E. C. from Tensas Parish in 1943. They bought the old Sutton place on Black Bayou. Here they reared their 5 children. In addition to farming, Frank also drove a school bus until his retirement. He has long been Chairman of the Board of Deacons in the 1st Baptist Church. Opal has taught younger children for more than twenty years. Both are active in community affairs.
Their oldest of 3 sons, Jerry, is a graduate of Louisiana Tech and the New Orleans Seminary. He holds a doctorate in Theology from the Luther Rice Seminary in Jacksonville, Florida. He is pastor of Fair Park Baptist Church in West Monroe, La.. He and his wife, the former Patsy Pippen of Waterproof, have a son. Jerry serves on various state committees in the denominational work, and on the Board of Trustees for the Baptist Children’s Home.
There older daughter, Alyce, is a registered nurse. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree from Northwestern University in Natchitoches. She and her husband, Coy Henley, live in Norphlet, Arkansas, with their 3 daughters.
The second daughter, Shirley, received her Bachelor of Arts degree from La. Tech. She is married to Dr. Kenny Crump, professor of Mathematics at La. Tech, and they have 1 son and 2 daughters.
Ned, the middle son, is a local farmer, and has done most of his work toward a degree from Tulane University. He is married to the former Merle Scott of Houma. They have 3 daughters.
The youngest son, Gene, is a graduate in Agronomy from La. Tech. After serving 3 years in the military, he returned here to farm. His wife is the former Jo Logan of Rayville, La., and they have 2 daughters. For several years Gene served as Music Director in the 1st Baptist Church and is also a deacon. “ From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Edwards, Eloise
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “cooperative Home Agent and club leader” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Egelly, C. R.
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Ellis, Julia Clement (see Clement, T. I.)

Evans, Annette
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “good neighbor, community & church worker.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember” ?

Farrar, W. H.
War’s End: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Fields, Joseph (see also Banks, Leandrew)
Nicholas Walker and Joseph Fields (daughter is Gertrude; married Leandrew Banks)both served three years as privates in Company "I", 50th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War.
The ex-Union soldier, Joseph Fields worked for a time as a stevedore on the Mississippi. Later he farmed on Oakland Plantation and eventually bought land of this own on the lake from Mr. Thomas Sitton. Here he build his home and reared his family. In addition to farming, he sold garden produce, fruit and furs. Joseph was self-educated and loved to read. He helped many Negro Civil War veterans and their widows to obtain pensions. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Finley, Elizabeth

Finley, Samuel

Flake, ?
RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “The first settlement in East Carroll in the early 19th century was on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Lake Providence, which then called Stock/Stack Island Lake. James Floyd claimed a section of land between the river and the lake, alleging that he had settle upon it in 1803. William Culfield and William Collins each claimed a section of land on the lake, their tracts adjoining Floyd‘s claim. They also dated their occupancy from the year 1803. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Floyd, James
“Settlers began to come in after the U. S.’s purchase of the territory out of which Carroll Parish was later carved. Among the first settlers are the names of James Floyd, Hugh and Samuel White, John Millikin, and Shipley Owens. These surnames appear early in the records of West Carroll Parish also.
Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A,

Floyd, Jennie
EMAIL:
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998

“Mary Virginia "Jennie" Floyd and her parents, names currently unknown. She was born on December 13, 1868 in Louisiana. Her father supposedly owned a large plantation, and lost it when he killed several people in a feud over cattle. Her great aunt, a Sadie Green, supposedly left the family millions, which could not be claimed
because Jennie's father had changed his last name from Floyd to Phillips. Interestingly, I have found an Elizabeth "Hattie" Green, who was a railroad owner, who still has a 60 million dollar fortune, currently unclaimed, because no heirs have come forward-in Louisiana!! Mary Virginia was called "Jennie V." by her father, according to her
youngest son, Harold Riley.
Sometime during the 1880s, Jennie met and married Samuel Richard Riley. They had 10 children, 7 of whom lived to adulthood. Whereabouts of four of them are known after 1910: Carter Richard became my great-grandfather, Harold lived in Houston, and had many children, and Doc lived in Alabama. Howard died in 1912 in Nacogdoches County, Texas.
Nothing is known about the other children, Miranda (a son-weird name for
a boy, huh), Clida (pronounced Clydie), Altha Jewell (always called Jewell), and another child, who died before the 1900 census. Jennie would have been two or three in the 1870 census.
“Mary Virgina "Jennie" Floyd Riley worked in the textile mills of Textile Village in Houston after 1910. She is found at 29 Washington Avenue, Houston, Harris County, Texas, in 1920. She hadn't been on a census since 1910. Her two youngest sons, Doc and Harold, were living with her, along with a boarder, a Mr. Will Monk, a very mysterious gentleman.
Jennie Floyd Riley died on March 17, 1922 in Houston, of the flu, complicated by a five-year history of pellagra. She is buried in Washington Cemetery, Houston, and her grave is marked only by a large damask rose bush. We believe that it is in the "Strangers' Rest" section, since the rest were sold in large plots, which were very
expensive.
Before Jennie's death, her daughter-in-law, Roxie Phillips Riley, reported that she pulled a bunch of feathers out from underneath her mattress, and spoke to them in a strange language. Roxie also said before her own death in 1962, that Jennie had told her that her mother had been a schoolteacher. Now, isn't that a little odd? Do you think
that the "feathers" were actually a rosary? Or was Jennie into hoodoo?
Jennie also supposedly killed a man, with a hoe (!!), according to her grandson, Charlie, who says that his father, Carter, Jennie's oldest living son, told him that.
Rumors also abound that Samuel Riley left the family. Perhaps Jennie caught him running around and got out the gardening tools again? :) Another rumor says that the family tried to move West, but came back when Sam died somewhere in West Texas. That could explain the lack of records between 1900 and 1920.
But, here's the thing: the two youngest kids, Harold and Doc, were born in Nacogdoches in 1908 and 1910. I have their birth certificates. And Howard, another child, died in Nacogdoches County in 1912. The tombstone says, Son of Samuel Richard and Mary Virginia Riley, and it was also confirmed on the death certificate. Now, if they were in Nacogdoches County, which they certainly seem to be, why are none of the family members listed on the 1910 census there, or in any of the
surrounding counties? ALANNA
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000
Samuel Richard Riley married Mary Virginia Floyd-she was the daughter of William Talton Floyd and Miranda Jane Cherry. We had heard that William Talton Floyd had killed a man named Archibald and fled to Texas. The newspaper article was submitted to “ancestry .com” by Becky Colvin. The victim’s name was Thomas Archibald and there was a $3000. reward, a lot of money in those days. Alanna had just found out they are going to have a baby. The article was probably in the Richland Beacon newspaper on 9/13/1873.” MELISSA RILEY

Floyd, M. M. (?Moses)

Floyd, Moses
“The first direct information we have of a permanent settler in this area comes to us by way of church history and an old newspaper which says that Tobais Gibson from the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church has been assigned to preach up and down the Mississippi Territory. He attended the Annual Conference held in Harrison Co. KY., in 1799 and asked for help in the vast territory which he was unable to cover. He was awarded a young man by the name of Moses Floyd, a young minister of three years experience. He too, was a native of South Carolina and unmarried, the best status for a circuit rider.
This status did not last long because the Revereend Floyd became interested in and married a Miss Hannah Griffing, and in 1807 came to the west banks of the Macon River and organized a Methodist Church. Perhamps his new family status created a desire to settle down in one place, because he also began to practice medicine. Later, as a trading post developed and the village began to grown, it was named Floyd in honor of its first prominent settler, Moses Floyd.
“Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Floyd, Sylvanis C.

Furgerson, ?
RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “Mr. Furgerson, assistant county agent, said Randall Vining had told him once that he heard “old timers“ say the Yankees reached the court house and were piling records out to burn when driven off.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Gaddis, Jeff D.

Gaddis, Tom

Gano, John Allen
Text from James Challen, (editor), Ladies' Christian Annual, October, 1857 (Volume VI, No. 10), Philadelphia: James Challen, Publisher. Pages 305-310. This online edition © 1998, James L. McMillan.
Born: Georgetown, Kentucky, July 14th, 1805 Died: October 14, 1887
ACCOMPANYING the portrait of John Allen Gano, a minister of the Gospel of Christ.
The mother of John A. Gano was born in Bedford County, Virginia. Her father, Caleb Ewing, not long after, was killed by lightning, and she, with a near relative, moved to Kentucky, then quite a wilderness, where, in 1797, she was married to R. M. Gano, the father of John Allen Gano. She died of consumption in Georgetown, April 9, 1812, leaving four daughters, Mary, Margaret, Cornelia, and Eliza, and three sons, John Allen Gano, the subject of this sketch, Stephen F., and Richard M. His father, in his forty-first year, died near Georgetown, October 22nd, 1815, soon after his return from his last campaign in the war of 1812. Thus, in the eleventh year of his life, John A. Gano was left an orphan.
He completed his academic courses in 1821.
Being in bad health, he spent a portion of his time in travelling in the southern part of his native State. In the year 1822, he went to reside with his near relative in Cincinnati, Major Daniel Gano, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas of Hamilton County, Ohio, and continued in his office for one year, after which, returning to Georgetown, in March, 1823, he commenced the study of law under Judge Warren, and in 1826 was duly examined and admitted to practice.
In the midst of his preparations for his future career as a lawyer, and while travelling south, with a view of making a location in Texas, he was suddenly and violently attacked with hemorrhage of the lungs. In his affliction, he called on the Lord, and resolved, if spared, to become a Christian and seek preparation for a better world.
Early in the summer of 1827, he heard the Gospel of Christ, as preached by Elders Barton W. Stone, Francis R. Palmer, and Thomas M. Allen. Under the immediate labors of the last-named person, he embraced the good news of salvation, and began at once to proclaim the Gospel to his fellow-men. He was immersed by Elder T. M. Allen, at Georgetown, Kentucky, July 10th, 1827.
In October, 1827, he was married to Mary Catherine Conn, daughter of Captain William Conn, of Bourbon County, Kentucky, and became after this event a resident of that county. In 1828, he visited Harrodsburg, Republican, Fayette County, and Kentontown, near the Blue Licks, and always with more or less success.
Although engaged in farming on a small scale, as a means of support to his little family, he was hindered but little in his labors, and, so far as his health and strength would admit, he gave himself wholly to the work. In after years, the long and protracted ill health of his wife restricted his field of labor to the regions round about his home, though his heart panted for a wider circuit. In all the year 1830 he preached regularly at Union, Antioch, sometimes at Leesburg, Mount Carmel, Cynthiana, Cooper's Run, Lexington, Georgetown, and often in his own vicinity.
He set out late in the year 1847 for Louisiana. After spending a month at Lake Providence and on Joe's Bayou, he preached the way of salvation; leaving his family early in January, 1848, he went to Baton Rouge, and finding here a few brethren,--among them G. G. McHatton and wife,--through their influence he obtained the use of a meeting-house, and organized a congregation of eleven members,--the first church of the kind planted in that city on Apostolic grounds. He then proceeded to the City of New Orleans, and introduced ten or twelve more into the ancient faith. He then returned to Baton Rouge, and remained with the infant congregation he had planted until it numbered about forty-five; returning to Lake Providence.
John A. Gano has been the father of eight children; two died in infancy, and one,
Fanny C., not long after her marriage, died, in the hope of immortality, at the early age of eighteen.

Gardener, Jim (colored)

George, Sir
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir George’s, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Girard, Stephen
“Land sold cheap, some of it for as little as $1.25 per acre. People saw stablilization now that the land belonged to the United States and one could be certain of titles. Many influential planters from the east and other sections of the nation began to come into the area near the Mississippi Rivers by the 1820’s. None were more prominent than the Morancy brothers .”
Emile and Honore Morancy were born in San Domingo of parents descended from French nobility. Their parents were killed during the revolution in that countyr. The children were saved by a nurse, who hid them in a hogshead (a barrel) and rolled them aboard a ship owned by Stephen Girard, bound for Philadelphia. After reaching the city of brotherly love, Emile was adopted by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the great statesman, philosopher, and signer of the Declaration of Independence. Honore was taken in by a French abbot. Both boys were educated, Emile to be a doctor, Honore a teacher. They came to Louisiana to be cotton planters and politicians.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Gittinger, Howard
Howard Gittinger was born in Iowa, the son of Howard Gittinger and Mae Howe Gittinger. He moved to Baton Roughe with his parents. After graduating from L. S. U. Howard worked as a reporter for the Morning Advocate. He then served 5 yrs. as an officer in the U. S. Army, in the States, and in Okinawa and in Korea. He joined the Mitchiner family in their farming operations, until his retirement in 1970. Nantelle, or Nannie Estelle Michiner, and Howard Gittinger, Jr., were married in Baton Rouge, La., in 1941. She was a graduate of L. S. U. and a member of Kappa Delta sorority. She first worked in the press room at the State Capitol, then in the State Library in public relations. She was also Society Editor for the Morning Advocate. He continues to serve as President of Olivedell Planting Company and his wife is Secretary-Treasurer. Mr. Gittinger has been a Director and President of the 1st National Bank. He is also a Director of the North La Federal Savings and Loan Association. During the administrations of Governors Davis, McKeithen, and Edwards he served as a member of the 5th La. Levee District.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Graham, Harry
BIOGRAPHIES: “Mr. & Mrs. Harry Graham of Transylvania Plantation”. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Griffin Children (see also BIOGRAPHIES: G. W. Griffin and Jerushia Griffin)
BIOGRAPHIES:
Griffin, Alphonso Julius “A son, Alphonso Julius, 1926-1969, was a kind and lovable child, but due to a birth injury he was unable to grow and develop. His smile was a source of encouragement to others. Another son, Alonzo Clark, died soon after birth.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
Griffin, Anderson Andrew “1915-1969 At the age of 11 yrs. won a state oratorical contest by reciting a paper, “The Resources of La,” written by a local attorney, Robert Kennedy. He delivered the same oration at Tuskegee and won the national competition there. Later he earned a degree from Southern, attended Fisk University at Nashville, and received his medical degree from Meharry Medical School in Nashville. He interned at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis. In 1946, he joined the staff of Harris Hospital in Fort Worth. He was a member of many medical societies including the American Medical Association and the American Society of Abdominal Surgeons. He married Jessye Alamon and they had one daughter. Mrs. Griffin and Daughter are both registered nurses. Dr. Anderson Griffin was killed by hoodlums as he left his clinic.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
Griffin, Camille Imogene “Third daughter, Camille Imogene Griffin was so precocious that she entered the 1st grade at the age of four. At a young age she entered the 1st grade at the age of 4. At a young age she assisted her mother with the canning kitchen and in teaching food preservation and preparation. She was valedictorian of her class, and went to Ark. A. & M to take Home Economics. She was president of her graduating class. She first taught in Monroe and later became Home Demonstration Agent in Red River Parish. In 1948, Camille moved to Washington, D. C., where she served as an analyst for the Dept. of Defense and then as a supervisor. She works with under-privileged children in summer camps and teaches handicrafts. The mother of four, she has combined parenthood with a career.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
Griffin, George W. “1912-1926, was called GG. W.” and graduated from the 8th grade as valedictorian. As there was no local high school for blacks, he went to Southern High School (in connection with the college). He sang in the school choir and took part in all extracurricular activities. He met an untimely death by drowning at Southern University. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
Griffin, Edward Staton “1917-1975, served in the Armed Forces from 1941-1946. He graduated from Southern, attended University of Colorado, and secured a Master‘s degree from L.S.U. He taught in L. P., St. Gabriel, Louisiana, and served as principal of T. A. Levy school in Iberville Parish for 22 years. Edward had one daughter who now lives in St. Charles, Missouri. Stanton, respected school principal, was shot from ambush in his car.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
Griffin, Hylda Parks “The oldest daughter of G. W. Griffin & Jerushia, 1910-1964, attended Southern University, University of Colorado, Prairieview College, Tuskeggee Institute and Arkansas A & M. College. She was first a classroom teacher and then Principal of Carroll Elementary School. She married Major Jones and their children were Major Julius & Mary Ann.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
Griffin, Vivian Faye “The second daughter, attended Arkansas A.& M. and Southern University. She received a degree in elementary education and spent the next 30 years as a 2nd grade teacher in the local schools. She retired in 1969 because of failing eye-sight. She married Sam Frazier, a skilled carpenter, who has built more than a dozen churches in this area.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Griffin, George Washington
BIOGRAPHIES: “ George W. Griffin was born in Brandon, Miss., the youngest of 8 children. Born a decade after slavery, George early decided that he wanted to be “something and somebody.” One day he left his plow in the field and went to the house and informed his parents that he was going to college. Penniless, he set out afoot for Tougaloo College in Jackson, Miss.
George worked his way through school as a field and janitorial helper. Few Negroes could read or write then and most of the teachers of the college were whites from the North. G. W. Griffin excelled in penmanship, and took courses in Latin, Carpentry, the Bible, instrumental and vocal music, drama and good manners?
Griffin came to Louisiana to teach because of better salaries. The “Professor“ began his career at Transylvania, La. Later he transferred to the East Carroll Parish Training School, and eventually became its 1st Principal. He remained there until his retirement in 1947. He also taught classes for adults. At an in-service class which he taught in Monroe, he met Jerushia Parks and convinced her to come to L. P. to teach. Later they were married.
George & Jerushia Griffin had 8 children: Hylda Parks, George W., Jr., Vivian Faye, Anderson Andrew, Edward Stanton, Alonzo Clark, Camille Imagene, and Alphonso Julius.
South of Lake Providence, on La. Hwy 65, “Professor“ bought 22 lots and built his home. At the time his property was outside the city limits; he wanted to be in the country so he “raise children, chickens, cattle and hogs without encountering too much friction from too close neighbors.”
In 1913, he bought a 164-acres farm at the head of the lake and called it Lake View Plantation. He sold the excellent timber and began raising pecans, rice, sugarcane, cotton, and corn.
Professor Griffin was a good business man and a humanist. He was never heard to speak unkind words against anyone. At meals Griffin would test the children‘s knowledge of the multiplication tables, the parts of speech, and various Bible verses and stores. Holiday dinners usually included goose, dressing, English peas, hot buttered rolls, potato pie, ambrosia, mellowed fruitcake, hot jelly cake and homemade wine. Every Sunday the entire family attended Sunday School and in the afternoon they went for a walk on the levee or a ride in the car. Heavy stress was placed upon education. The children were encouraged to learn poems and read book from an early age.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Griffin, Jerushia (wife of G. W. Griffin)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Jerushia Parks Griffin, the remarkable mother of this family was born in 1882 and died in 1941. She attended Tuskegee Institute and received a certificate in Domestic Science. After she came to East Carroll as an elementary school teacher, she became a Jean’s Supervisor under the Julius Rosenwald School system. Later she became the 1st Home Demonstration Agent in the parish, and continued this work until her death. She taught canning, jelly making, rug weaving, caning chairs, upholstering, sewing and handiwork, mattress making, cooking, meal planning, and landscaping.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember” (see also BIOGRAPHIES: G. W. Griffin) (see also BIOGRAPHIES: Griffin Children)

Guenard, Flo
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “business woman, hostess, community leader” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Fields, Joseph & Iscoy Walker (see BIOGRAPHIES: Banks, Leandrew)

Floyd, Mrs. Moses (Hannah)

Floyd, James
“Settlers began to come in after the U. S.’s purchase of the territory out of which Carroll Parish was later carved. Among the first settlers are the names of James Floyd, Hugh and Samuel White, John Millikin, and Shipley Owens. These surnames appear early in the records of West Carroll Parish also.
Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Floyd, Sylvanius C.
“Roads had begun to improve, and freight wagons were in vogue during dry weather. Overland mail routes were being established for the same reason. A mail route was established through this territory by the 1850’s which ran as follows: Deerfield (Delhi) to Floyd, 22 miles; postmaster, Peter Oliver, April 5, 1847. Floyd to Vista Ridge, 8 miles, postmaster, S. C. Floyd, December 11, 1851. Vista Ridge to Caldonia, 15 miles, postmaster, Amos Swator, October 19, 1854. In Oak Grove, John M. Stewart was postmaster in 1857.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Frye, Margaret (see Surles, Alphy Pittman)

Fulgum, Silas
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Silas Fulgum was a deputy sheriff in 1875 and served as principal of Tyrone Plantation School from 1889. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Galloway, Samuel
EARLY SETTLERS: “According to local courthouse records, the first settlers recording their land holdings did so in the early 1800‘s. Samuel Galloway, for whom Galloway Bayou is named, sold land in 1833 to William Henderson.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

EMAIL:
“Hi! I'm trying to find out if Franklin Decatur Galloway was in Carroll Parish in 1870. I know he was there in 1850, but went back to Mississippi for 1860 and I can't find him in 1870. But in 1874 his son, George Lewis Galloway married Ann Eliza Alsobrook, daughter of the Civil War Casualty I wrote about. So it could be they all came back to Louisiana in the time period I can't place the man.
Also, was James Franklin Galloway in Carroll Parish in 1870? He'd be old enough to have his own place. Thomas Gough would be, too. In fact, chances are any Galloways in the area are related to my George because he had nine brothers and he was one of the middle sons. Also, was George Lewis Galloway still in LA for the 1880 Census?
If this is too much to look up. Concentrate on Franklin D Galloway for 1870 (I'm hoping George is in his household) and George Lewis Galloway for 1880.

Gardener, Jim
“A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. All office were filled with colored people, Cain Sartain was senator, followed by Jackworth Clay. Jim Gardener was representative for awhile.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: Cain Sartain of Goodrich Landing was the first representative, and then Senator about 1875. Jim Gardner was also representative but he probably was from West Carroll. Jacques A. Gla, President of the Board of School Directors, lived on the lake front, J. R. Grimes was a pastor and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Nicholas Burton served as Sheriff and the Secretary Treasurer of the School Board.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

George, Sir
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir George’s, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Gibson, Ben & Janie
RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Gibson, Tobias
“The first direct information we have of a permanent settler in this area comes to us by way of church history and an old newspaper which says that Tobais Gibson from the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church has been assigned to preach up and down the Mississippi Territory. He attended the Annual Conference held in Harrison Co. KY., in 1799 and asked for help in the vast territory which he was unable to cover. He was awarded a young man by the name of Moses Floyd, a young minister of three years experience. He too, was a native of South Carolina and unmarried, the best status for a circuit rider.
“Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Gilfoil, Patrick
EARLY SETTLERS: “Patrick Gilfoil in 1843 left Omega Plantation to his heirs--this being then a part of Carroll Parish. William Henderson owned 2.702 acres in the Henderson community, and Benjamin Boughton, a Methodist minister, owned 540 acres in the Nine Mile Reach--all dated 1843. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Gilmore, John
“The following is an example of land dealing by absentee land owners after Louisiana became a state in 1812. The Baron de Bastrop and the John Adair claim are both mentioned.
The land transaction in which the Adair claim is mentioned is found in old Notarial Book A., page 60, ‘John Smith, resident of Baton Rouge to Charles Hubb, resident of Ouachita Parish, a deed to 950 acres of land, being a part of Baron de Bastrop grant, known and distinguished in the Ludlow Map of the State of La., to be a part of General John Adair’s claim, deed by said Adair to Sevard Claiborne and purchased by said Smith, as it will appear in Recorder’s Office, Parish of Ouachita, consideration $1200.00. This land the western half of Section 8 and the whole Section 5, agreeable to the platt and survey executed by me, John Gilmore, in the beginning of Year 1822 and deposited in the Judge’s offices of the parish of Ouachita and Baton Rouge, this the 24th day of May, 1822.’
On the same page we find John Gilmore purchasing from John Smith section 7 and the half of section 8 west of Bayou Macon on April 11, 1822. Thus, we know these two land transactions involved a part of what is now West Carroll Parish and we also see that dealing or speculating in land by absentee landowners began early in our history and continued for over a hundred years.
John Gilmore was a resident of Ouachita Parish, but, I believe, he lived in Monroe. He is listed as a resident of Ouachita Parish in the 1830 census.”
From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Gla, Jaques A.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Cain Sartain of Goodrich Landing was the first representative, and then Senator about 1875. Jim Gardner was also representative but he probably was from West Carroll. Jacques A. Gla, President of the Board of School Directors, lived on the lake front, J. R. Grimes was a pastor and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Nicholas Burton served as Sheriff and the Secretary Treasurer of the School Board. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Goldenburg, Z.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was Z. Goldenburg’s Blacksmith Shop, which shows a refection of the times.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Gonzales, Juan
EARLY SETTLERS: “The earliest land grants date back to the Spanish period. In 1789, Governor Miro signed a certificate granting Juan Gonzales a tract of land ‘40 arpents front, by depth of 40 arpents’, or equal to 1,354 American acres, situated on the Bayou Macon, in what was then the post of Ouachita. John M. Hamblin of the Registrar’s office in Ouachita, La., for the District North of Red River on April 18, 1835, certified the above claim of Juan Gonzales.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Graham, Jessica

Graham, Nellie (see BIOGRAHIES: Powell, Nellie Graham)

Graham, Rachel (see also Hood, Harbird) (see also Benjamin, William)

Grant, George W.

Gray
“In another section Miss Stone says, ‘A letter today from Mrs. Hardison. They and the Currys expect to move into the neighborhood in a few days. She writes gloomily of affairs on the river. The Newmans and the Grays are the only families left out there. Mat Johnson, after being beaten by his negroes, has come out to Floyd with fifteen other men and trying to raise a company to drive out the marauding Yankees. If only those backwoodsmen from across the Macon River would come over and help us.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Green, ?

Greer, Tommy Mable (see Biggs, Thomas G., D. D. S.)

Grice, Anna (see Hooper, Anna)

Griffin, Bill
“After the war the Quantrell Gang stayed around, of and on, for several years. W. E. Huffman, present parish assessor of West Carroll Parish, said Bill Griffin told him of accompanying Cole Younger to Oak Ridge one day in the short distance from a general merchandise store, and as they approached the store, one of the 4 men sitting on the porch said, “That is a fine horse you have there.” Col answered, “None better anywhere, if so, I would have it.” Another man said, “I will challenge that, I have a horse that can outrun your horse any day!” Cole accepted the challenge and a bet was made in the amount of $200, all Cole Younger had. Judges were found and the race took place; Cole’s horse won by a small margin.
On the way back to the store an argument began over the honesty of the race and the outcome was even questioned. Cole said very little but asked for his money when they reached the store. There was hesitation where upon Cole whipped out his pistol and shot the 4 men before anyone knew what was happening. Then he turned and said, “Come on, Bill.” They rode out of town on across Boeuf River whence they came. No one followed then or later. No arrests was ever made, even though three men lay dead and one badly wounded.” From “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Griffin, George Washington

Griffin, Jeff & Mary (Ballard)
Griffin, Jerushia Parks

Griffing, Hannah (see Floyd, Hannah)

Grimes, J. R.
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: Cain Sartain of Goodrich Landing was the first representative, and then Senator about 1875. Jim Gardner was also representative but he probably was from West Carroll. Jacques A. Gla, President of the Board of School Directors, lived on the lake front, J. R. Grimes was a pastor and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Nicholas Burton served as Sheriff and the Secretary Treasurer of the School Board, From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Guire, Peter

Guier, R. C. & Eunice

Hagaman, ?
EARLY BUSINESS OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, LA.: Lake Providence has always been the seat of government for the parish, except from 1855 to 1870, when, as a part of the parish of Carroll, the seat was moved to Floyd (now West Carroll). Some of the business house and churches of the early town mentioned in old newspapers are: (1848 - 1881) Hagaman House. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Hamley, Edward J.
“BIOGRPHIES: “The Hamley family came to E. C. Parish in 1878. Edward J. Hamley, a native of St. Louis was long prominent in local politics and civic affairs. He was mayor of L. P. for 12 years, and a member of the 5th District Levee Board fro 20 years. His wife was born in Bavaria and came to this country in 1860. The couple had 4 children; Dr. William Hugh Hamley, John Martian Hamley, Edward Doe Hamley, and Joseph Celestine Hamley.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hamley, Edward J.
“BIOGRPHIES: “John Martian Hamley, the 2nd son, was a member of the State Legislature from 1912 to 1924, where he authored many significant legislative acts. He served as Clerk of the House for a total of 20 years. He served on the La. Flood Control Committee. He married Miss Katie Ransdell in 1914; she was the daughter of the late Judge F. X. Ransdell. Their children were Edward, Mary, Katherine, Annie Louise, John Martian, Jr., Stuart Douglas, Madeline, and Elizabeth. In early years the children attended St. Patrick‘s parochial school, and later girls went to Maryville College in St. Louis.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hamley, Joseph Celestine
“BIOGRPHIES: “The youngest son, Joseph C. Hamley & Agnes Hamley celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary in June 1964, with a receiption at the Country Club. They were married May 27, 1914, at St. Joseph‘s Church in New Orleans. They had 5 daughters and 33 grandchildren.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hamley, William Hugh.
“BIOGRPHIES: “Dr. W. H. Hamley practiced medicine here after WWI until his death. After graduation from Tulane University Medical School he served in the army during WWI and attained the rank of Colonel. In addition to the practice of medicine, he was also coroner, the 1st commander of Powell-Martin-Barrett American Legion Post and an officer in the “40 & 8”. He is well remembered for his congeniality, his fondness for sports, and for his service as the unpaid physician for the high school football team. Dr. Hamley was married to the former Mabel Roderick of Denver, Colorado. They had 3 children: Mabel Hamley, W. H. Hamley Jr., and Margaret Mary Hamley.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hamley, John Martian
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Martian, the 2nd son, was a member of the State Legislature from 1912 to 1924, where he authored many significant legislative acts. He served as Clerk of the House for a total of 20 years. He served on the La Flood Control Committee, and his support of equalized public education helped to stabilize public education for many years. For many years he was a partner with his father in the real estate business. He was elected of the La. Flood Control committee. Miss Katie Ransdell and Martian Hamley were married in 1914; she was the daughter of the late Judge F. X. Ransdell. Their children were Edward Ransdell, Mary, Katherine, Annie Louise, John Martian, Jr., Stuart Douglas, Madeline and Elizabeth. In early years the children attended St. Patrick’s parochial school, and later the girls went to Maryville College in St. Louis.” From "A Place to Remember", Mrs. Georgia Pinkston

Hamley, Katie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “in insurance business; a devout Catholic” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Harbin, Eloise
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “long-time bank employee” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Harding, John D.

Hardison, Mrs.
“Miss Kate Stone (writer of “Brokenburn” her diary) mentions Mrs. Elizabeth Savage going to Floyd frequently in 1862. I assumed the Savage Plantation was nearer the Macon River than most of the others. She said, ‘Mrs. Hardison was telling us of Mrs. Abe Curry’s trip on horseback to Floyd. She must be crazy.’ A footnote said this was fifty miles round trip and mentioned Floyd being the county seat of Carroll Parish. There were federal troops in this area trying to stir up trouble among the slaves which was the reason Miss Stone thought Mrs. Curry’s trip hazardous.”
“In another section Miss Stone says, ‘A letter today from Mrs. Hardison. They and the Currys expect to move into the neighborhood in a few days. She writes gloomily of affairs on the river. The Newmans and the Grays are the only families left out there. Mat Johnson, after being beaten by his negroes, has come out to Floyd with fifteen other men and trying to raise a company to drive out the marauding Yankees. If only those backwoodsmen from across the Macon River would come over and help us.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Harp, F. M.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business merchants were A. Violett, F. M. Harp, and William Rous in Lake Providence. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Harris, Novella
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “manager of Harris Funeral Home” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”?

Harris, Virginia
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “mother of 4; part-time office work, voted outstanding citizen” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”?

Hash, John
EARLY SETTLERS: “John Hash executed his promissory note to Prentice and Henderson in the sum of $583, and secured punctual payment by a mortgage of 8000 pounds of “ginned cotton now growing on Hash‘s place on Bayou Macon, which cotton is to be delivered by Hash at the gin on his place by the 1st day of March, 1833. It not paid on stated date, Prentice and Henderson shall be allowed to seize and sell the said cotton and all other cotton, whether in bales or otherwise, belonging to Hash.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hawkins, Jesse
EARLY SETTLERS: “Janie Blockwood & Jesse Hawkins have lived in and reared a family of 12 children and 3 grandchildren in East Carroll since 1913. Jesse, a WWI veteran, was overseer of the Brown Plantation. Janie was the daughter of Rev. & Mrs. Louis Blockwood. Many members of this family are teachers. Sons Leo Dennis and Joel, and grandson Leo, Jr., and daughters Dorothy and Geraldine are all employed in East Carroll school system. Son Huey and his wife both teach in St. Landry Parish. Daughter Rebecca and her husband and a granddaughter teach in Morehouse, and another daughter was a teacher in Greenville. There are eleven teachers in this one family! All three sons served in the armed forces. Janie reared 3 granddaughters. One teaches in the Michigan school system, another is in the postal service in California, and one is a registered nurse in Slidell. The daughter in California is a district advisory representative for the schools. Another son is an urban renewal reprsentative. One daughter-in-law is the local Food Stamp Supervisor.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hawkins, Mary Warren (see also Warren, Omie Pinkston)
BIOGRAPHIES: “The oldest daughter of Morgan L. & Omie Pinkston Warren, Mary, was born in the parish in 1904. She attended school in Transylvania and graduated from French Camp, Miss.. She received a degree from Northeastern University . She married W. B. Hawkins in 1928. Their son, W. B. Jr., graduated from Camberlain-Hunt Academy in Port Gibson, Miss., and from Louisiana Tech. He was a pilot during the Korean Conflict. For 30 years Mary Hawkins served as Treasurer of the Herrington Baptist Church in Monticello, La. She is a member of the Eastern Star and long taught 1st grade in the public schools. For more than 40 years she was a 4-H Club leader, and has served on the parish Welfare Board, the Library Board, the Red Cross and Parish Advisory Committees. “Miss Mary“ is known as a good neighbor and has given much of her time to the care of the sick and the needy.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hawsey, A. J.
BIOGRAPHIES: “’Ten Oaks‘ in Monticello community has been the A. J. Hawsey home since 1958, and was originally the home of her (Mrs. Hawsey’s) parents, W. L. & Lorena Vining, who moved there from West Carroll Parish. The parents of A. J., who were R. J. & Anna Bell Hawsey, came to Monticello, La. in 1930, where Mr. Hawsey first worked for the McPherson family. A. J. had two brother: Corporal Henry Davis Hawsey, who was killed in WWII in the Battle of the Bulge on April 3, 1945, and M/Sgt. Kenneth Hawsey, who was killed on Aug. 15, 1966. He was East Carroll‘s first Vietnam casualty.
The A. J. Hawseys have 4 children: Alan was valedictorian of his class at Monticello High School, a former Marine Air Corps. M/Sgt. & aerial photographer. He is presently a pilot and farmer manager for the Keener Howard Farms. Andy Hawsey, graduate of Monticello, lives in Delta, Louisiana, where he farms and he, too, is a pilot. Renee Hawsey Martin and her husband, Louis, live on Bel Mar Plantation. He owns the Delhi Flying Service. Candy Hawsey is a Briarfield student.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hayes, John

Heath, Sir Robert

Hedrick, Cyrus
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war. Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Henderson, William
“EARLY SETTLERS: According to local courthouse records, the first settlers recording their land holdings did so in the early 1800‘s. Samuel Galloway, for whom Galloway Bayou is named, sold land in 1833 to William Henderson.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

“EARLY SETTLERS: John Hash executed his promissory note to Prentice and Henderson in the sum of $583, and secured punctual payment by a mortgage of 8000 pounds of “ginned cotton now growing on Hash‘s place on Bayou Macon, which cotton is to be delivered by Hash at the gin on his place by the 1st day of March, 1833. It not paid on stated date, Prentice and Henderson shall be allowed to seize and sell the said cotton and all other cotton, whether in bales or otherwise, belonging to Hash.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Henry, ?
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Henson, Harrison
“William Pitt Kellogg, a colored man under the domination of northern Yankees, was elected governor of the state in 1872. He appointed Harrison Henson as magistrate for Ward 2, and Sheriff for Carroll Parish. Leon LeFevre said these colored appointees west of the Macon never served. Magistrate Henson came to Floyd to hold court one day. After Ace Anderson held a conference with him, he departed without holding court and never returned in the capacity of magistrate again. “ Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Herring, J. S.
PHYSICIANS IN EAST CARROLL--(Mentioned in old newspapers) “1858 - Dr. J. S. Herring. “ Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

“A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “In 1878, PARISH OFFICIALS FOR West Carroll were first elected. These were Senator C. Newton, State Rep. Dr. J. S. Herring, Sheriff P. M. Gaddis, Clerk Of Court A. L. Allen, Assessor Andrew Dannon, Tax Collector T. M. Gaddis, and Judge E. D. Hannigan.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Herzog, Marian
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “government agency employee, town council member” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”?

Hicks, Charles
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Charles Hicks, another sheriff and member of the School Board, is mentioned in records for 1875.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hicks, Laurie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “secretary, church altar society” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”?

Hider, Mrs. George Turner (see Benjamin, William)

Hider, George Turner
BIOGRAPHIES: “Soldier, engineer, banker, inventor, Canal Zone Commission employee and plantation operator are some of the activities that have marked the interesting career of George Turner Hider, vice-president of the Bank of Dixie (formerly Lake Providence Bank). Since graduating from Cornell University in 1909, as a mechanical engineer, his activities include work with the U. S. Steel Corp., manager of the Power & Light Plant, cotton gin operator, cotton dryer engineer, state highway commission engineer, city councilman and police juror. Mr. Hider was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on October 13, 1886. His father, Arthur Hider, was a native of London, England, and came to Canada with his family as a youth. Arthur Hider, father of George Turner Hider, was a civil engineer and for many years was engaged in levee construction, channel improvement, bank protection and flood control work on the Miss. River with the United State Corps of Engineers. Arthur Hider died in Greenville, Mississippi, in 1916. Mr. Hider‘s mother was Emma Anderson, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, born in Oct 1855, and died in Greenville, Miss in 1942. The Hider family consisted of 5 children-- 3 sons and 2 daughters. The eldest son, Arthur Hider, Jr., died in 1936, William P. Hider died in 1951. The daughters were Mrs. Arthur Shepherd (Louise Hider), died in 1948, and Miss Emma Knight Hider, died in 1967.
Mr. Hider worked for the U. S. Steel Corp at Wheeling, West Virginia. Later he went to Panama, where he served for 2 years as a Canal Zone Commission employee (1911-1912). He came to L. P., La. In 1912 to manage the Power & Light Power Plant for a year. He then became a cotton ginner and remained in this business for 50 years.
During WWI he spent 8 months in the U. S. Army. From 1920 to 1924, he served as a La. State Hwy Commission engineer. During his public career he has served as a member of the L. P. City Council, the East Carroll Parish Police Jury, and for many years has served as vice-president of the Bank of Dixie. He has also been active in many community services including the Ration Board during WWII and was active in the establishment of the Production Marketing Association Committee (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture) in the parish.
Mr. Hider won national recognition with an automatic device which controls a tractor by remote control. (see INVENTORS) He is owner of Lake Hall and Lake Home Plantations, and for many years was actively engaged in farming. He served as the 2nd president of the La. Delta Council. In 1953, he was a member of the Board of Directors of All
Saints Episcopal College in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Mr. Hider was President of the National Ginners Association (1953-1954), and in 1963 was awarded the Horace Hayden Memorial Trophy.
Mr. Hider‘s wife, Miss Virginia Benjamin, of L. P., was born Dec. 5, 1907. She is the daughter of William B. Benjamin & Elizabeth McCulloch Benjamin. Mrs. Hider and her parents were all born and reared in the parish. Mr. & Mrs. Hider have 2 daughters, Virginia (Mrs. Clarence J. Martin) and George Ann (Mrs. James E. Wesner), now residing in Alexandria, Virginia, and Washington, D. C.
Mr. & Mrs. Hider are both prominent in social and cultural circles. Mr. Hider is a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, the Sons of the American Revolution, the American Society of Mechinal Engineers, the American Legion, and is a communicant of Grace Episcopal Church..” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.


Hicks, James

Hilding, Christina Caroline (see Nelson, Alfred & Christina Caroline (Hilding)

Hill, Mrs. Luther (see BIOGRAHIES: Pittman Brothers)

Hilliard, Henry
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Hollingsworth, Joseph

Hood, Harbird
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

CITIZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: “Harbird Hood and his wife Nancy Stanford emigrated to this area in 1812. They were the parents of John Moon, Govy, and Lucinda Hood. While driving a heard of cattle, the first son was killed when his horse threw him against a tree. His widow was the former Rachel Graham who later married Mr. Will Benjamin‘s father.
Govy was a minor when his family moved to this area. He was married twice - first to Nancy Catherine Phillips, and after her death to Julia Ann Chandler. The site of their home was that of the present George Hider home on the lake known as the Hood place. This family gave its name to Hood Street in L. P. and to Hood Lane which adjoins the O. S. Brown property. Govy owned a livery stable in L. P.. He donated a site for a Catholic Church to Archbishop Anthony Blane of New Orleans on Oct. 15, 1851. Earlier his father Harbird, had given a camp-meeting ground to the Methodists in the parish.
Govy Hood and his sister Lucinda Hood Everett Chambliss (Mrs. Robert J.) in 1837 donated a site for the Carrollton Bank, lot #52, ‘to be used as a banking house or Office of Discounts and Deposits of the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad.’ Further requirements were that the building be of brick and not less than two stories high. Horace Prentice was president of the company and G. Skipworth was the cashier.
Fauxbourg-Chambliss was the 80-acre tract on which the Robert Chambliss home stood, and it became the southern extension of the town of Providence. In 1854 the family donated the entire tract to the town.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

TOWN OF PROVIDENCE: “After selling the first 15 lots laid out on the river front, Martin & Keene later sold the remaining part of their plantation to Harbird Hood and his wife, Nancy Stanford, and to Hood’s son, Govy Hood and his daughter, Lucinda Hood Everett Chambliss.” From Georgia Pinkston’s Book “A Place to Remember”.

Hood, Govy (see Hood, Harbird)

Hood, John Moon (see Hood, Harbird)

Hood Lucinda (see Hood, Harbird)

Hood, William

Hook, George

Hooper, Bob
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Bob Hooper said his father told him the Yankees came in from the North and burned 4 or 5 houses late one evening before they were driven off by citizens. His father lived just north of Floyd and his home was by-passed for better houses to burn.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Hooper, Joe & Anna (Grice)

Howard, Mr. & Mrs. Rufus Keener
BIOGRAPHIES: “Mr. & Mrs. Rufus Keener Howard came to this parish from Mississippi in 1922. They were first in Transylvania and lived at Melbourne Plantation for 2 years. Mr. Howard then purchased Ingleside Plantation which he later sold to John Phillips. Howard next bought Carrollton place, which is now owned by his John Rolfe Howard. The 2 oldest daughters, Eunyce and Elizabeth graduated from high school here and from La. Tech in the same class. Eunyce became the parish‘s Home Demonstration Agent in 1933. She worked in that capacity for a total of 30 years, doing all of the Home Demonstration and 4-H work alone for 21 years until an assistant was hired. She retired in 1963 to care for her parents. In 1972, she began a 2nd career as Food Director at the East Carroll Parish Hospital.
Elizabeth received further training at Touro as a dietitian, and at the time of her early death in an auto accident in 1940, was dietitian at Southwestern University. The 2 younger sisters are Clayton Mulheim, a teacher in Monroe, and Snowdie John, who with her husband, lives in Sun City, Florida. They have 3 sons, Keener, Herbert, and John R. are all farmers in the parish. Keener received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Southwestern in Louisiana. For a period he was farm manager for John Phillips at Engleside Plantation and for Thomas W. Vinton at Highland Plantation. He bought Highland Plantation in 1946 and built a gin there. The Howard-Millikin Corporation today involves co-ownership of the holdings with his sons, Richard and John Robert. In 1955, Keener’s family was selected Master Farm Family by the Progressive Farmer magazine. Keener Howard is Director of 1st National Bank, co-founder and President of the Board of Directors of the Briarfield Academy. He is a member of the Board of Stewards at the United Methodist Church. He and Elois Aden were married in 1939, and their 6 children are: Linda Anne, a graduate of Baylor University and the wife of the Reverend William R. Senter, Jr.; Richard , married to Judith Ann Whitaker, of Eudora, AR., both are graduates of Baylor; John Robert, who attended Hinds Junior College and Northeast University and who is married to Diane Dalfiume; Penny Elizabeth, who also attended Baylor, is married to Arthur Dale Lasseter; Susan, a student at Baylor; and Brian Aden, a student at Briarfield. They also have 10 grandchildren. Mrs. Kenner Howard has been a Sunday School teacher and department director at the 1st Baptist Church continuously since 1949. She has served as President of Baxter Bayou Home Demonstration Club and has been a member of the East Carroll Parish Library Board since the library opened in 1954. She is a member of the Trail Blazers Library Trustees; a 4-H Club leader; Rainbow Girl’s Leader; Cub Scot Den Mother; member of Eastern Star, and Chairman of Brairfield Academy library.” From Georgia Pinkston’s Book “A Place to Remember”.

Howard, Herbert
BIOGRAPHIES: “The 2nd son of the R. H. Howards, Herbert, also attended Southwestern. He is a farmer and was chairman of the A. S. C. office for several years. He and his wife, Hilda, live on Lake Marie Plantation, and have 5 sons and 1 daughter.” From Georgia Pinkston’s Book “A Place to Remember”.

Howard, John Rolfe
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Rolfe is married to the former Marilyn Jones of Arcadia, Louisiana. He owns Carrollton Plantation. For several years he represented his Ward as a Scholl Board member and served as President of the Board. They have 3 children. Marilyn is employed at the Family Services Center, and is a graduate of La. Tech. One of the Howard family members states: ‘Our parents taught us all to work and to work hard, and the best we could. They took us to Church and Sunday School. They gave us a good example in helping others.’ There are 8 children in all - one dying in infancy -- and 19 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.” From Georgia Pinkston’s Book “A Place to Remember”.

Hubb, Charles

Huber, S.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was a Shoemaker, A. Huber, which shows a refection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Huffman, W. E.
(see Stories by the Local Folk: “Cole Younger’s Horse Race“)

Hunter, W. H.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Howard, Gertrude Fields (see BIOGRAPHIES: Banks, Leandrew)
Howard, Herbert K.

Howard, John Rolfe

Howard, Rufus Keener

Hyland, Hattie Ollie (see Nelson, John Julius & Ollie)

Hyland, William Aloysius & Hattie Rozenna (Paine) (see Nelson, John & Ollie)

Ingram, Nicholas
STREETS AND ADDITIONS: “Ingram Street was named for Nicholas Ingram.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Jackson, M. M., wd. at Shiloh, died at Lake Providence, La., July 11, 1863. (?)

Jefferson, Mose
BIOGRAPHIES: “Angeline, mother of 10, was born in East Carroll, Mose, the father, came here as a child from White Castle, La.. He worked with the U. S. Corps of Engineers, operating and maintaining equipment. He was cited in 1974 by the Corps for his outstanding work in flood-prevention programs. He owns a small farm which he now rents out. In the Sweet Caanan Missionary Baptist Church Mose is deacon and a choir member of the church. The 6 daughters are: Barbara Jean, college graduate (2 masters degrees), of Baton Rouge; Betty, Southern graduate, social worker, teacher, businesswoman in Chicago; Alice, Grambling graduate, teacher, realtor, small business with sister Betty; Delores, graduate of Southern and teacher in Chicago; and the youngest, Brenda, attends business school. One son, Mose Oliver served in the Air Force and later located in Chicago as area manager for “Kentucky Fried Chicken“ in 4 states. Mose now owns a real estate firm and several day-care centers in Chicago. William Jennings, a practicing attorney in New Orleans, is a graduate of Harvard University School of Law. He was the 1st black lawyer to be a clerk for a federal judge. He next served as a judicial clerk, and became legislative assistant to U. S. Senator J. Bennett Johnston. Bennie Lee is a student at Southern University. Archie is a pre-veterinary student at Southern.
Angeline has served as a president of the P. T. A. member of the Bi-Racial Committee, Assistant Director of the Emergency Food and Medical Program, and Director of the Program for the Aging in East Carroll. She was the 1st Negro employed by the local Welfare office. Her strong belief in education is not only reflected in the lives of her children, but also in the fact that she received her high school diploma in 1968 after attending adult education classes.” From Georgia Pinkston’s Book “A Place to Remember”.

Jackson, David
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: Henry Jones remembered favorably by many was a merchant. In 1896 he erected a nice residence south of the courthouse. Today the house is occupied by his son-in-law and daughter, the Henry Simmonses, Charles Hicks, another sheriff and member of the School Board, is mentioned in records for 1875. David Jackson was Clerk of Court and Marion Sweet was recorder.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Jackson, Hugh Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2000 11:08:20 EDT
“I have an ancestor Hugh Jackson who died of cholera aboard a steamboat on the
Mississippi River in 1833 on his way from Ireland to Florence, AL and the
home of his first cousin. He is buried in Lake Providence. There are references to his grave in family papers ..."we visited Uncle Hugh's grave in Lake Providence," but no notation of location of the grave/cemetery. I would appreciate any information possible in finding a record of his death and/or the location of his grave. Your web site
is very well done. Thank you in advance. Morgan V. Merrill 4413 Charleston Place Circle, Nashville, TN 37215 615-665-2915 Morganvmer@aol.com

EMAIL:
Jackson, Thomas Andrew From: Kay McMahan Noska on May 6, 1998
kayn@webtv.net Kay Noska 1407 Alvin Ave. El Campo, TX. 77437
FATHER: Thomas Andrew Jackson,
Born in 1831 in South Carolina and died 1890's in West Carroll Parish, La.
Marriage Date/Place: 16 Feb. 1860-West Carroll Par. LA. Other Marriages: none
Mother’s name is Hannah.
MOTHER:
Perry, Mary Virginia, born 1840-Holmes Co. MS., died 1890's-West Carroll Par. La.
Mother's Father was William Perry-1812 Virginia
CHILDREN:
Charles A. Jackson, born 1861-West Carroll Par. La.
Eddie Jackson, born 1864-West Carroll Par. La.
Henry George Jackson, born 1866-West Carroll Par. La, married Mary Ellen Simms
in Epps, La. W. Carroll, La. He died 1948-W. Carroll Par. La.
Robert Lee Jackson, born 9 Oct. 1868-Epps, La. W. Carroll, La., died 1 Dec. 1955-Epps, La. W. Carroll, La. Wife: Sarah "Sallie" Calvit on 10 Jan. 1889-Epps,La.W. Carroll, La.
James Richard Jackson, born 1873-Epps,La. W. Carroll, La., died on 15 Sept. 1962-Olney,Texas. Married Mary Ewing on 18 Jan. 1889
Joe William Jackson, born on 10 Aug. 1875-Epps,La.W. Carroll, La., died 4 Nov. 1964-Epps, La.W. Carroll Parish, La.. Married Mattie Brock on 9 Apr.1896-Epps, W. Carroll Parish, La.
Thomas Jefferson Jackson, birth: 12 Dec. 1879-Epps, La. W. Carroll, died on 28 Oct.1958-Epps, La. W. Carroll Parish. Married Julia Grayson in 1896-Epps,La.W.Carroll Parish.
Notes: I am in search of Thomas Andrew Jackson's fathers first name as he died right before the 1850 Carroll Parish Louisiana census was taken. If anyone is working on this Jackson family please let me know. Thomas & Mary Perry Jackson both died in the 1890's and are buried in the Miday Cemetery. In Richland Parish, La. just outside of the town of Epps, La. this was told to me by their Granddaughter, Hattie Beatrice Jackson Lusk {daughter. of Joe William Jackson & Mattie Brock and wife of he late Tommy Lusk of Epps, La.} Information Sources: 1850-1860-1870 West Carroll Louisiana Census.
Relatives Jackson-Calvit Bible Midway Cemetery. Headstones West Carroll Marriages,
Newspaper Obituaries KAY.

Jackson, Wilford

Jaret, Captain
RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “The Ouantrill/Quantrell Gang, as the guerrillas were known, came into the area between the rivers for two reasons. First, the isolation and vast swamps, which made pursuit dangerous; the second , the Younger and James Brothers, who were members of the gang, had relatives in this region. Cole Younger’s daughter married Captain Jaret, and they lived on the Eddins place south of the Bayou Macon Church and a sister of the James Brothers lived near Delhi. They were welcome in this area for their help, especially in organizing and drilling the Home Guard. “ From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin


Johnson, Mary Ellen (see BIOGRAPHIES: Schneider, William H. & Fredericka (Hall)
Jones, Robert


Jennifer, W. M.
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: In 1895 on the Republican Executive Committee were M. E. Massee from Ward 3 and John Asberry from Ward 4, a brother of Isham Asberry. W. M. Jennifer, Principal, published The Carroll Banner in 1890 with Reverend S. Martin as associated editor in 1892.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Jones, Henry
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: Henry Jones remembered favorably by many was a merchant. In 1896 he erected a nice residence south of the courthouse. Today the house is occupied by his son-in-law and daughter, the Henry Simmonses.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Jones, R. P.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Jones, Sam
BIOGRAPHIES: “Long-time residents, and a large family, are the children and grandchildren of the Sam Joneses of Blount Street. The mother traces her ancestry back to the Blockwoods, who were slaves. The family first sharecropped on Mr. W. K. Brown’s plantation and on Buckmeadow Plantation. They took advantage of a federal program to buy a small farm in 1941. Their 14 children helped with farm work, as well as earning money with outside jobs. The work ethic paid off; 5 of the children went to college; 1 is a lieutenant colonel in the army; 1 is an attorney and assistant legal advisor to Governor Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts; another is an assistant District Attorney; some are teachers and in business for themselves. All of the sons except one who is in the Reserves, have served in the Army. 2 were in Vietnam, and one, James was killed in action there in January, 1967. (see VIET NAM CASUALTIES) There are 56 grandchildren and 36 great-grandchildren. The family has ‘a strong sense of honor and duty. “ From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Keegan, William
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880, one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Tin Shop of William Keegan, which shows a refection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Keene, Alexander
“CITIZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: Judge Morgan of Ouachita Parish bought almost all of Ward 2 in East Carroll Parish for $1.25 an acre. Three Presidents of the U. S. signed the many deeds: Van Buren, Jackson, & Tyler. He owned what is now Wilton Plantation and Morgan Plantation, living on Wilton which was later owned by Norris Williamson. His only surviving child, Julia, married Alexander C. Keene, a widower of Stamboul Plantation. She and some of their children are buried on the south side of the Stamboul house, the present home of Mrs. Harry Shields.
After the death of Alexander Keene, Julia married her cousin Oliver Tennile Morgan, son of Oliver Morgan’s brother Jonathan, who owned and lived at Salem Plantation and was a former sheriff of Ouachita Parish.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Keene, William Billingsly
“FIRST TOWN FORMED: In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

The story of the Keenes is interwoven with Bodien, Buckner, Bynum, Constant , Elley, LaMothe, Morgan, Richards, Tebbett, Graham, and Schneider families. These seven generations of the Keene family span one hundred and thirty years.
It begins with William Billingsly Keene of Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky, and Carroll Parish, who was the first W. B. Keene (there being three generations with those initials) and his wife, Hannah Bodien Wallis of Baltimore. They had four children; two daughters, Mary Keene Elliott, wife of Dr. Theodore Elliott, and Eleanora Keene Richards, wife of Dr. William Lewis Richards of Kentucky.
The Lewis Richards were the parents of Alexander Keene Richards, who inv invariably sighed his name "A. Keene Richards". He loved horses and travel. W. B. Keene purchased Transylvania Plantation from his Richards son-in-law in 1831. Harry Hardeman Graham, a Keen son-in-law, gave the right-of-way for a railroad line through Transylvania in 1902.
In 1860, a steamboat was given the family name. Arabian thoroughbred horses-- a gift from the Sultan, were raised and jasmine and myrr plants were grown in the house garden. The family formed a New York cotton company which shipped thousands of bales of cotton to Liverpool, England.
The Keene family enjoyed a high standard of living. Invoices for barrels of superfine flour, Spanish saddles, bales of wool, boxes of candles, casks of Port wine, kits of mackerel, imported cologne, white sugar by the barrel, buckboard for the men, and a carriage for the ladies clearly indicate this. The ladies of the family bought fans to match each gown. These fans were made of gauze, satin or vellum, with sticks inlaid with mother-of-pearl, and prices ranging form $20. to $50. The poise and dignity of the ladies, and the self-restraint and courteousness of the mean whas tempered with religion--the Episcopal.
The will of the first William Billingsley Keene was dated Septemeber 27, 1856, and in it he gave away plantations with a few strokes of the pen and dollars by the thousands. Earlier he had given his sons the plantations on which they were residing. "I have given my Louisiana land and slaves to them at sundry times, " he wrote.
Frances Elley and John Wallis Keene, son of William B. Keene, were married. Their five children were: William Bodien (W. B. number 2), Ben Harry, Mry E. and Tubman. Mrs. Keene inherited land and slaves from her parents in Mississippi and used both in the management of Sauve Terre. After the death of her husband in 1854, she assumed the supervisory duties of the plantation for a four year period assisted by a manager. On December 28, 1858, she married Dr. Horance B. Tebbetts who was probably from Massachusetts. During the Tebbetts-Keene marriage they renamed the steamboat the "Mary E. Keene".
The oldest son, William Bodien Keene, married Caroline Atherton Bynum, a descendant of Marquis LaMothe of France. They had three children, two daughters and a son. The older daughter was Frances Elley Keene, known for her beauty and grace. The second daughter, Jessica Atherton Keene, married Harry Hardeman Graham. She died after the birth of her second child, Jessica Graham Schneider. The first child was a son, Samuel Lowry Graham. The son of the W. B. Keenes was named Wallis Bodien Keene earned the rank of captain during the Civil War and was a prosperous planter. He owned Atherton Plantation and half of Sauve Terre, with his sister Mary Keene Constant.
His plantation store " " resembled a handsome river packet. His office was finished in old gold.
Captain Keene died on August 14, 1891. The Civil War had taken its toll on the plantation. Mrs. Keene carried on the business to the best of her ability, but on August 1, 1894, Charles Newman of the firm, H. & C. Newman, commission merchants of New Orleans, bought at auction the home , its furnishings, land, cattle, and the store merchandize, paying $189,102.28, or two-thirds its appraised value.
On January 4, 1895, Mrs. Keene filed the last papers of her succession of the estate and later moved to town.” THINK THIS CAME FROM THE NEWPAPER STORY BY MAUDE VANFOSSEN

Keller, ?

Kellogg, William Pitt
“William Pitt Kellogg, a colored man under the domination of northern Yankees, was elected governor of the state in 1872. He had vast appointive powers, in fact, he appointed at will, men for man offices. He appointed Jim Ridley, a native of Carroll Parish , living near Floyd, as representative for Carroll Parish at one time. He appointed Harrison Henson as magistrate for Ward 2, and Sherriff for Carroll Parish. Leon LeFevre said these colored appointees west of the Macon never served. Magistrate Henson came to Floyd to hold court one day. After Ace Anderson held a conference with him, he departed without holding court and never returned in the capacity of magistrate again. “ Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Kelly, Lawton
Kent, William
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Kennedy, H. L.
BIOGRAPHIES: “Hugh L. Kennedy, Sr. and Lillie B. Jacob Kennedy are the elder members of this family. He was born in Farmerville in 1905, and she in Temple, Texas, in 1907. They are the parents of H. Leroy Kennedy, Jr., and Frances Janet Kennedy. Janet died in 1959. They came to this parish in 1942, and Mr. Kennedy was at first a partner of A. P. Surles in the Providence Equipment Company. He was also a co-owner of Planters Butane Company, and Secretary of Carroll Gin, Inc. Mr. Kennedy went into full-time farming in 1955 with his son, and built a home on the farm on La Hwy 134. He was instrumental in the organization of the 1st Christian Church in Lake Providence. H. Leroy Kennedy, Jr. and Marilyn Kelley Kennedy, daughter of Arlo and Grace Kelley, were both born in Amarillo, Texas. He moved to L. P. with his parents in 1942, and graduated from La. Tech University in 1951. He then began farming with his father. Leroy is past President of E. C. Farm Bureau and is a member of the Soybean Marketing Committee. Marilyn moved to L. P. in 1958, and for 11 yrs was legal secretary for the Voelker, Ragland, and Brackin law firm. She was instrumental in the organization of the 1st Christian Church. The H. L. Kennedys, Jr., are parents of Harold Lee Kennedy, a graduate of L. S. U. Medical School, and now a Captain in the Navy in California. Kelly Don Kennedy is a graduate of La. Tech and is a farmer. Michael Hugh, Kay Frances, and Charles Patterson Kennedy all attend Briarfield Academy.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Kennedy, Dr. J. L.
BIGRAPHIES: “In 1967, Dr. J. L. Kennedy celebrated his 91st birthday. He was East Carroll‘s oldest native citizen and still a practicing dentist. He was one of 4 sons of Joseph M. Kennedy who came to L. P. from Clinton, Louisiana, in the early 1870‘s. Joseph was a lawyer, judge, and a Confederate soldier. Dr. Kennedy‘s brother, Robert P. Kennedy, was also a lawyer.
Dr. Kennedy had 2 sons, Joseph and Leonard, and a daughter, Dorothy. Leonard has for several years been the Assessor for the parish.
According to a local newspaper: ‘Dr. Kennedy reminisced about the days of his youth and the beautiful belles of that time--Nellie Delony, Mary Montgomery, Dolly Kennedy, Edna Pilcher and many others. He spoke of the old Opera House days when Robert Kennedy, Mack Goodwin, Dave Parker, and Sam Kennedy helped furnish the music for the wonderful entertainments held there. Their pianist was Kate Davis Maben, a very talented musician, who played the piano in very much the same style as the lady pianist on the Lawrence Welk‘s program. Mrs. Vail Montgomery was one of the chaperones, who gave her time so freely.’
Dr. J. L. Kennedy painted a very vivid picture of the early town of L. P.--the dirt streets which were almost impassable during bad weather. He can remember when once a team of 4 mules got stuck in the mud on the corner where the L. P. Bank was located (a livery stable was there at that time). The sidewalks consisted of nothing more than two planks and the ditches were open drains where fish, frogs, and eels could be caught.
Dr. Kennedy‘s favorite hobby of overlay and inlay woodwork was begun when a boy and continued through the years. He made many interesting and delicate articles of wood. He had a certificate dated May 3, 1953, proving that he made the 1st hole-in-one shot at the Legion Golf Course; and another, dated Nov. 26, 1958, when he visited the celebration of the Louisiana Purchas and was made an honorary citizen of New Orleans.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Kerr, Joseph & Nancy
EARLY SETTLERS: “Joseph Kerr and wife, Nancy, and daughter, Harriett Davisson, mortgaged to Michael and Philip Maher, merchants of New Orleans, a tract of land in Township 21, Range 13 East, to secure a loan of $530, which “if not punctually paid when the same shall be due, then the land shall become the property of said Mahers, to all intent and purposes for them to dispose of as they think proper, reserving the overplus, should there be any, after the sale of the land to Kerrs and Davissons.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Kilcrease, D. D.
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Kleinpeter, Ed
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Knox, William Lucky

Labat, Marguerite (see BIOGRAPHIES: Terrel, John)

Landfair, Mary Ann (Mrs. Darrell)

Lane, Alex G.

Larche, Jaque

Latting, Abram

Leach, Arlene
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “devoted to church, family, loved people” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”?

Leddy, Louis J.
Louis J. Leddy was born in New York City, January 1st 1861, having arrived in our little town in his early boyhood (1881). We first greet him in the “Blue store” under the employ of Mr. T. Byrne. He left our town with Mr. Martin’s family some six years ago to cast his lot in Vicksburg; where he won a host of friends by his genial and pleasing manners. He was clerk at the Washington Hotel. And later of the Hotel Piazzo.
Mr. Leddy was characterized with an amiable disposition, a courteous and attractive personality, which won for him the love and esteem of all who knew him. “I knew him well Heratio.”
He had his faults and foibles, but when we look at his many priceless virtues, we ought to lose sight of them; a fast friend, unwearied in his exertions to unselfishly serve his friend as far as he was capable, and equally an earnest to forgive an injury.
He was conscientiously and rigorously attached to principles, while respecting the rights of others, incapable of betraying their conscience, trust or honor; a man un__ng to vigor of mind and strength of soul that di__cified, and gentle courtesy which is only the perfume of Christian charity. Louis J. Leddy died of consumption at Vicksburg, MS on June 5, 1894 at his friend J. L. Martins’ home. He was 33 years old. He left a brother and married sister, residents of Chicago. His father, mother, and other members of the family are buried in the Lake Providence Cemetery where his remains will be taken by the steamer City of Hickman.

LeFevre, John
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

LeFevre, Leon
(see Stories by Local Folk: “Halt says Ace Anderson”)
(see Biographies: Witkowski, Simon)
(see Politicians; Kellogg, William Pitt)
“Leon LeFevre says his parents were living near Floyd at the time, and he heard his mother say that the Yankees, five or six white men, plus about 200 Negroes, crossed the Macon at Poverty Point and started toward Floyd.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Leggett, Josehine (see BIOGRAPHIES: Williamson, Norris Charlescraft)

LeMay, L. T.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Drays & Wagons business of L. T. Lemay & T. J. Powell, which shows a refection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Lensing, Leo & Betty
BIOGRAPHIES: “In 1948, Leo Lensing came to Lake Providence from Arkansas. He is President of an insurance company, a director and vice-president of the Bank of Dixie, president of Alluvial Land Company, a member of the Board of Directors of the Northeast La. Livestock Show, executive committee member of the Ouachita Valley Council of Boys Scouts of America and was the parish Heart Fund Chairman for 3 yrs.
He is married to Betty Bauer and they have reared 10 children. 3 of the 6 sons are doctors. Betty, a busy mother, is known in a quiet way for thoughtfulness and unselfishness. Their home, known as Angus Haven, adjoins a pecan orchard, a cattle ranch, a tennis court and the lake.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Lensing, Betty
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “good neighbor, Good Samaritan” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”?

Lipp, Leopold & Mabel (Long)

Lindsey family
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Linnard, Stephen B.
“EARLY SETTLERS: Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Loftin

London, Robert L.

Long, Lafayette Hendon & Anna (Jackson)

Long, “Mac” (see Tucker, Tilghman)

Longmire, Peter

Lorren, Jeannie (see BIOGRAPHIES: Ragland, William Betron)

Lott, Colonel R. H.
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Lott, J. D.
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Lowry, Alfred J. & Cleora C.
“EARLY SETTLERS: Some citizens of the parish became sufficiently affluent to invest their money. Joseph M. Patten and wife, Ann M. Patten purchased 75 shares of $100 each in the Union Bank of Louisiana which was created and incorporated by an act of the Legislature and approved on April 21, 1832. Honore Morancy and his wife, Eliza Jane Morancy, purchased 135 shares in the same bank, Catesby B. Minnis held 120 shares, and Alfred J. Lowry and wife, Cleora C. Lowry, owned 120 shares.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Lumpkin, Edward
Baron de Bastrop did make a direct contribution to Northeast Louisiana y interesting others with means and influence in the area. It is said that he knew and secured the interest of Edward Lumpton, who influence Thomas Jefferson to make the Louisiana purchase. General John Adair, Judge Charles Lynch, Aaron Burr, and Stephen Girard, The Philadelphia philanthropist, became interest in the “Washita” country through the Baron, who was an adventurer and a speculator. He dreamed of a great wheat state and trade with the Indians, d, but, of course, he and the others were more interested in the land near the large waterways, the only means of transportation for large quantities of supplies. Thus, the land between the rivers was left to land speculators and eventually the small farmers and planters.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Lusk, Squire

Lynch, Judge Charles

Lyons, W. R. C.
“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Mansol, Juan
EARLY SETTLERS: “Juan Mansol claimed 20 arpents front of land on both sides of the Bayou Mason (sic) in the post of Ouachita, the tract having a depth of the usual 40 arpents. Mansol later sold this holding to Eliza McFarland for $22,500. 00 in 1827.. .“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Martin, Geneva
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “community leader and Girl Scout leader” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Martin, John L.
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Mason, John
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir Georges, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840.’ “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Mason, Samuel (Pirate)
“The first we know of the white man to the east of us comes by way of history. Williamson’s History of Northeast Louisiana tells us of the episodes of a gang of pirates operating on the Mississippi River in the late 1700’s in the area of what is now Lake Providence. These pirates were led by a Captain Bunch, later being joined by a group of cut throats run out of Kentucky whose leader was Samuel Mason. So successful were these pirates in harassing river traffic that boatmen, who successfully evaded them and made it safely past the bend in the river, thanked providence for their delivery. Later, they began to call the place Providence. Historians say the Macon River received its name from the pirate, Samuel Mason.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Massee, M. E.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “In 1895 on the Republican Executive Committee were M. E. Massee from Ward 3 and John Asberry from Ward 4, a brother of Isham Asberry.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Maxwell, John
ADDITIONS:FAUXBOURG-CHAMBLISS: “In May of 1852 John Maxwell subdivided 80 acres of land formerly owned by Lucinda Hood Everett, who married Robert J. Chambliss. This addition to the town was known as Fauxbourg-Chambliss. (Fauxbourg meaning a town with a wall - levee). This area was donated to the town by Mr. & Mrs. Chambliss in 1943.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Mays, James (pirate gang member)

McAllister, Charles

McClandish, Mrs. Alice

McClendon, Alma (see Patrick, Edward Wilburn “Pop“ & Alma)

McClendon, Mr. & Mrs. R. E.
BIOGRAPHIES: “Alma Ray McClendon is the older daughter of Mr. & Mrs. R. E. McClendon, who came to Lake Providence from Shreveport in 1934. Her younger sister, Martha Carolyn, is now Mrs. James Scott, and her brother is John Dennis McClendon of Baton Rouge. Mr. McClendon was first a dealer for Sinclair Oil Company, and later dealt in real estate and insurance. Mrs. McClendon was a supervisor of Welfare Services, and also soloist in the Methodist Church Choir. Following their retirement the McClendons moved to West Monroe. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

McCulloch, Elizabeth (see also Benjamin, William)

McCulloch, William (Dr.) (see Tucker, Tilghman)
Tilghman M. Tucker, after serving as governor of Mississippi and also as a U. S. Governor Tucker died here in 1859. His daughter, Katherine, and her husband Dr. William McCulloch came to manage Cottonwood. During the Civil War, Dr. McCulloch served in the Confederate Army.
After the war, the McCullochs returned to Cottonwood only to find it in blackened ruin. The restored the place and bought another farm in the area known as "The Bend." One of their eight children, Elizabeth, married W. B. Benjamin. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

McFarland, Eliza
EARLY SETTLERS: “Juan Mansol claimed 20 arpents front of land on both sides of the Bayou Mason (sic) in the post of Ouachita, the tract having a depth of the usual 40 arpents. Mansol later sold this holding to Eliza McFarland for $22,500. 00 in 1827.. .“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

McGinpio, ?
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

McGuire, ?
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

McKoin, Captain JOhn

McIntyre, Angus

McIntyre, John & Jane (Oldham)

McIntyre, John (there were 2)
“Soldiers, who had left the area to fight, began to come home, some maimed, others ill, and all damaged by the horrors of war, lack of food, & clothing. Many did not come home. Two who did not return were Asbury Cawthorn and John McIntyre. One who did return was Henry De Los Briggs. He had been a merchant and school teacher before going to war; however, soon after returning, he decided to change his occupation. He married in Floyd in 1871 and moved to land he had acquired northeast of the present site of Forest. Here he build a home, owned a farm, built a school house, cotton gin and general mercantile store, and helped restore the South as others did.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

McGuirt, Wesley
War’s End: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

McMillan, William L.
(see The Infamous: “Carpetbaggers”, on this website)
“RECONSTRUCTION: Some northerners did move into the parish, including George C. Benham and the former Union general, William L. McMillan. Disparagingly called carpetbaggers by their neighbors, McMillan and Benham were successful as planters. Few other northern speculators survived for more than a season.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

McPherson, Nellie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “wife, mother, homemaker” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

McWilliams, Hamilton

McWilliams, Mary (see Vinson, Mrs. Mary)

Melrose, F. M.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Hack business of F. M. Melrose, which shows a refection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Mershon, Thelma
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “gifted pianist” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Miller, Elizabeth Louise (see Delony, Vail Montgomery)

Millikin, John
“Settlers began to come in after the United State’s purchase of the territory out of which Carroll Parish was later carved. Among the first settler are the names of James Floyd, Hugh and Samuel White, John Millikin, and Shipley Owens. These surnames appear early in the records of West Carroll Parish also“. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Minnis, Catesby
EARLY SETTLERS: “Some citizens of the parish became sufficiently affluent to invest their money. Joseph M. Patten and wife, Ann M. Patten purchased 75 shares of $100 each in the Union Bank of Louisiana which was created and incorporated by an act of the Legislature and approved on April 21, 1832. Honore Morancy and his wife, Eliza Jane Morancy, purchased 135 shares in the same bank, Catesby B. Minnis held 120 shares, and Alfred J. Lowry and wife, Cleora C. Lowry, owned 120 shares.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Mitchiner, Sam Kirkpatrick & Myrtle (Rentz)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Sam Kirkpatrick Mitchiner, brother of Mr. Tib, was born January 7, 1887, in Ouachita Parish, and died April 28, 1973. Mrs. Mitchiner was the former Myrtle Rentz. Mr. Sam had 1 daughter, Mrs. Virginia Kenney, of Stone Mountain, Georgia. He came to East Carroll in 1940 and lived at Olivedell acting as President of No Mistake Plantation. He served on the East Carroll Parish Police Jury from 1943 to 1968, was president of that body almost continuously from 1944. He also served on the Parish School Board, and was Chairman of the Parish Centennial Committee in 1963.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Mitchiner, W. T. “Tib” & Nantelle (Hedrick)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Mr. William Theobalbs Mitchiner was born Oct. 10, 1881, in West Monroe, La., the son of Mr. & Mrs. W. S. B. Mitchiner. Mr. Tib lived with his parents and 3 brothers, Thomas, Samuel, and Holmes G., on Monticello Plantation.
He Married Miss Hattie Hedrick of Floyd in 1906. For a short while they made their home in New Mexico, but returned to Floyd where their daughter, Nantelle, was born in 1916. Later they lived in Oak Grove and Mr. Tib was Deputy Sheriff there. Mrs. Mitchiner was the daughter of W. A. Hedrick and Molly Parker Hedick of West Carroll.
After moving to East Carroll, the family first lived on the Mitchiner’s No Mistake Plantation. In 1923 they bought Olivedell Plantation, just outside of Lake Providence. Here he and Miss Hat lived until their death. For 43 years he farmed East Carroll.
This fine southern gentleman’s contributions to this community were many. He was largely responsible for promoting the drainage program which made possible the communities of Lane’s Ferry and Corbin’s Ferry (both on Bayou Macon between the two Carrolls). He also served as President of the Police Jury, was a member of the E. C. Parish Hospital Board, was one of the original members of the Board of Governors of the E. C. Parish Prison Farm, and was President of the Farm Bureau Association.
During the administrations of Governors Sam Jones and Jimmie Davis, Mr. Mitchiner served as Superintendent of the Angola, the State Penitentiary. He was an advisory Director for the L. P. Bank, now known as the Bank of Dixie.
His daughter and her husband, the Howard Gittingers, still live here. Mr. Tib will be long remembered for pioneering many good farming practices, and for his high principles.” (see BIOGRAPHIES: Gittinger, Howard) Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Montgomery, Flora Carolyn “Flo” (see Trieschmann, William F.)

Montgomery, J. W.

Morancy, Emilus & Honore
EARLY SETTLERS: “Dr. Emilus Morancy, trustee of public school funds in Ward 1, and his brother Honore Perigny Morancy gave 320 acres to Reverend William H. Elder of Natchez, a Catholic Bishop. These two brothers were the proteges of Charles Carroll of Carrollton.” From “A Place to Remember” by Georgia Pinkston.

“Land sold cheap, some of it for as little as $1.25 per acre. People saw stabilization now that the land belonged to the United States and one could be certain of titles. Many influential planters from the east and other sections of the nation began to come into the area near the Mississippi Rivers by the 1820’s. None were more prominent than the Morancy brothers .”
Emile and Honore Morancy were born in San Domingo of parents descended from French nobility. Their parents were killed during the revolution in that country. The children were saved by a nurse, who hid them in a hogshead (a barrel) and rolled them aboard a ship owned by Stephen Girard, bound for Philadelphia. After reaching the city of brotherly love, Emile was adopted by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the great statesman, philosopher, and signer of the Declaration of Independence. Honore was taken in by a French abbot. Both boys were educated, Emile to be a doctor, Honore a teacher. They came to Louisiana to be cotton planters and politicians.”
“Honore Morancy was elected to the state legislature to represent Ouachita Parish in the late 1820’s. Soon afterwards, he introduced a bill to divide Ouachita Parish, which was passed in 1832. The new parish was named Carroll in honor of Emile’s foster father. Lake Providence became the seat of government.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

EARLY SETTLERS: “Some citizens of the parish became sufficiently affluent to invest their money. Joseph M. Patten and wife, Ann M. Patten purchased 75 shares of $100 each in the Union Bank of Louisiana which was created and incorporated by an act of the Legislature and approved on April 21, 1832. Honore Morancy and his wife, Eliza Jane Morancy, purchased 135 shares in the same bank, Catesby B. Minnis held 120 shares, and Alfred J. Lowry and wife, Cleora C. Lowry, owned 120 shares.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Morano, Hugo (June 25, 1981, East Carroll Delta News, by Maude VanFossen)
“Hugo's Restaurant opened July 1, 1956. After Hugo purchased the restaurant and took over the management he began to show interest in his surroundings. He is a native of Eudora, Arkansas. Hugo purchased the Oakland Manor. In Hugo's twenty-five years now as a permanent parish resident he has acquired a lovely family: Edith, his wife and Frankie, their son, but he had his trumpet much longer than that. He has played with a group: Sidney and Steve Guenard, Harvey Howington, and Hugo and his trumpet. Hugo plays solo for mass at church, taps at funerals, walking down the street; with the group at wedding receptions and night clubs, in fact anywhere there is dancing or a football game. It was at the football game of 1957, in the game between LSU and Ole Miss, at Oxford, Miss. that Hugo stood at the half and played L. S. U.'s Alma Mater never such an ovation. Hugo and his restaurant and his trumpet are bringing Lake Providence good publicity.”

Morehouse, Abram
“The Baron de Bastrop had promised as a part of his agreement when the king of Spain awarded him the two million acre land grant which included the present area of Morehouse and West Carroll Parishes, to bring in 500 settlers in an effort to colonize the area. He found himself slow in fulfilling this promise as settlers were reluctant to move inland away from the deep waterways. The hardships in getting supplies in and securing protection from Indians made it hard to attract settlers inland; so, the Baron de Bastrop decided to sell a portion of his grant, located on the west side of Boeuf River, to one Abram Morehouse.
Mr. Morehouse was an adventurer from Kentucky whom de Bastrop met in New Orleans. He immediately set up office in New Orleans to attract settlers to his new land. He offered them 400 arpents (acres) of land, tools for cultivation and supplies for three years. He found one Isaiah Davenport, who was interested in changing occupations and seized upon the opportunity to become a planter, the d, the dream of many at that time. Mr. Davenport had been a boat captain from Providence, Rhode Island, a seafaring man with a boat named ‘Cleopatra‘. He had been engaged in slave traffic catching young black males and females in Africa and bringing them to America for sale to the colonist. New Orleans was one port of entry.
Mr. Morehouse and Mr. Davenport came to the west bank of Boeuf River between the present site of Mer Rouge and Oak Ridge about 1797. They brought a few settlers with them and began establishing homes, each on his four hundred arpents of land awarded him by Baron de Bastrop. They looked to Fort Miro (now Monroe) for supplies and protection. For supplies and protection. Fortunately, protection from the Indians was never needed. The few Indians here were friendly and helpful to the settlers, teaching them what they knew of boat making, planting, and raising crops acclimated to the area; brought a few slaves with them, but the masters worked along side the slaves in erecting crude homes, clearing and cultivating the land with what tools they had, always sharing with each other. In this way they eked out a simple livelihood in the early years.
After the first settlers were under shelters, Mr. Morehouse returned to Kentucky, his former home, for the purpose of bringing in more settlers from that area. He traveled overland, enticing people along the way to come to the new land. He brought back with him several families, all traveling overland to what would be their new home site, a wilderness they knew nothing about except what their friend, Mr. Morehouse, had told them.
A few of these families from the east had left commodious homes with well-tended fields and orchards. Why? The lure of rich land just for the taking was the reason.”
There was only one frame building in the entire settled area up until 1831, and this was occupied by Mr. Morehouse. ” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin















Moore, J. A.
Moore, Layfayette & Susie
“We find land transactions recorded in the Clerk of Courts Office in Oak Grove which show that settlers were coming to this part of the country early in the 1800s. In old Book A., page 119, we find this recording, ‘Abram Eddins sold to Peter Alexander a portion of Section 18 T 20, NR10E, being the same land Lafayette Moore and his wife sold to Eddins on June 11, 1812 and recorded in Book, folio 113.’ Descendants of the Moores are with us today, also the Cawthorns.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Morancy, Honore, & Emile
MADISON PARISH , LA Madison Parish which was until 1838 part of Carroll Parish.
ck ISAAC SELLERS 1786
CK LAWRENCE CO, LA
=========
Honore Morancy built one of the most beautiful houses in northeast Louisiana at Milliken's Bend.
Jean Francois Morancy and a brother acquired property in the island and became extensive planters and slave owners.
Jean Francois Morancy was married in St. Domingo to Mademoiselle Honorine Molinery, a granddaughter of Madam Bouligny, the ceremony being performed by Father Pierre.
From this marriage there were six children, Joseph, Victoire, Melanie, Honore,
Pierre, Thadeus, and Emile. Their tranquility was of short duration, however,
as the insurrection of the slaves in St. Domingo was, if possible, worse than the
Revolution in France from which they had escaped.
At the beginning of the Revolution in St. Domingo the Morancys took refuge in
the town of Aux Cayes, where the mother died of yellow fever. Soon after Jean
Francois Morancy, his brother, and his wife's brother, with other members of
the family, were killed by the negroes when the town was captured and sacked.
Three of the children, Victoire, aged thirteen, Honore Pierre, about ten, and
Emile, five years of age, were saved by a servant belonging to the family, and
finally reached the United States,landing at Charleston, South Carolina, from
whence they were sent to Baltimore. Influential friends received them there, and
the history of their escape and description of their confiscated property in the
Island of St. Domingo, comprising several valuable plantations, was authenticated
and forwarded to the French Government, which recognized their claim and allowed
them an indemnity for many years.
Honore Pierre, the oldest son, was taken in charge by the Abbe Mercier, and
educated at St.Mary's College, Emmettsburg, Maryland. Madam LePeltier, a refugee
from France, assumed the care of Victoire and Emile, and about a year afterwards
some relations or friends took Victoire to the Island of Margalanti, in the West
Indies, where she grew up, married, went to France, and died there. Madam LePeltier
was recalled to France, and Emile entered the family of Mrs. Harper, a daughter of
Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, and was educated with her son, Charles Harper, at
Emmettsburg, under the patronage of Charles Carroll, who furnished the means for
his graduation in the profession of medicine. (NOTE: Charles Carroll was the only
Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.)
Honore Pierre's name was changed to Honore Perigny, in gratitude to Madam LePeltier, whose family name was Perigny. After the death of the Abbe Mercier, Honore Perigny
finished his education, and was Professor of French, Greek, and Latin in the college
at Natchez, Mississippi, until 1818, when on the 16th of July of that year he was
married (to Eliza Jane Lowry). He afterwards moved to Louisiana, where he entered
large tracts of land, and at the breaking out of the Civil War was one of the
wealthiest and most prominent planters in that State. He held many public offices,
and died at the advanced age of eighty-six in 1881. When in the Legislature he named
the Parish of Carroll in honor of his benefactor, Charles Carroll.
His son, Louis Morancy, married Agnes Morancy (sic), a daughter of Joseph Anderson and
Tunstella Kinkead, who was a daughter of Anne Quarles and Archibald Kinkead.
Emile Morancy, above referred to, married Agnes Kinkead, a sister of Tunstella, and
besides these two intermarriages of the Quarles' and Morancys, two of Honore Perigny
Morancy's grandsons, Thomas and Honore Jackson, married two of the descendants of the Quarles', whose ancestor was Tunstal Quarles, who married Susannah, a daughter of Ambrose Edwards.
From "Old King William Homes and Families" by Peyton Neale Clarke 1966
====
THIS doesn't lead to Martha Ann Sellers Emilius Morancy 28 May 1838 East Carroll MARRIAGE, but, must be close connection? msh
===============
MORANCY, HONORE P 01/17/1835 1422 LA0860__.195 13
=================
1840 MADISON PARISH, LA
Morancy H. P. 121 No Twp Listed
=========
1850 MADISO PARISH, LA SLAVE SCHEDULE
Morancy H. P. 191 73-75
=======
1850 MADISON PARISH, LA CENSUS
Morancy Agnes 7/12 Louisiana 375 381a
Morancy Bettie 20 Kentucky 375 381a
Morancy Caroline 15 Louisiana 372 381a
Morancy Eliza J. 47 Kentucky 372 381
Morancy Francis E. 32 Mississippi Physician 375 381a
Morancy H. P. 54 Santo Domingo Planting 372 381
Morancy Lewis 18 Louisiana 372 381a
Morancy Onorious 13 Louisiana 372 381a
===
1860 MADISON PARISH, LA CENSUS
Morancy Agnes 23 303 198 Mississippi
Morancy Agnes 10 300 166 Louisiana
Morancy E. 33 300 166 Kentucky Planter
Morancy Emelius 6 300 166 Louisiana
Morancy F. E. 2 300 166 Louisiana
Morancy H. M. 23 291 84 Louisiana Planter
Morancy H. P. 8 300 166 Louisiana
Morancy Honore P. 63 291 84 Santo Domingo Planter
Morancy L. M. 28 303 198 Louisiana Planter
Morancy Mrs. E. J. 67 291 84 Kentucky
=======
H P Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 63 1796 St Domingo Male
E J Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 67 1792 Kentucky Female (looks like Mrs. E.J. ?)
View Record H M Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 23 1836 Louisiana Male

View Record E Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 32 1827 Kentucky Female
View Record Agnes Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 10 1849 Louisiana Female
View Record H P Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 8 1851 Louisiana Male , JR on census
View Record Amelius Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 6 1853 Louisiana Male
View Record F E Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 2 1857 Louisiana Male
View Record L M Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 28 1831 Louisiana Male
View Record Agmes Morancy Not Stated, Madison, LA 23 1836 Mississippi Female
JOHN DALEY 22 NC, OVERSEER
====
NAME C S Age Image HH Ward Birth State
1870 MADISON PARISH, LA CENSUS
Morancy Amelia w f 32 102a 204 3 Mississippi
Morancy Eliza w f 66 105 253 3 Kentucky
Morancy Honore P. w m 73 105 253 3 West Indies
Morancy Lewis w m 38 102a 204 3 Louisiana
Morancy May w f 8 102a 204 3 Louisiana
Morancy Parker b m 20 149 23 5a Louisiana
Morancy Sam b m 70 149 23 5a Virginia
Morancy Virginia w f 1 102a 204 3 Louisiana
1879 Morancy E. J. Inglesfield Plantation 1,340 $13,800 953
1879 Morancy F. E., Est of Stockland Plantation 960 $2,500 952

1880 MADISON PARISH, LA CENSUS
Sellars Sallie m f 33 249 112 3w Mississippi (where 1860/70 =
Morancy Agnes, Mrs. w f 43 247 62 3w Mississippi
Morancy E. J., Mrs. w f 77 247 59 3w Kentucky
Morancy H. P. w m 84 247 59 3w San Domingo
Morancy Louis w m 9 247 62 3w Louisiana
Morancy Mamie w f 19 247 62 3w Louisiana
Morancy Victoria w f 12 247 62 3w Louisiana
1900 MADISON PARISH, LA CENSUS
Morancy L. T. Head w m 5 106a 391 29 Louisiana
NO SELLERS

Morgan, David L.
STREETS AND ADDITIONS: “Morgan Street was named for David L. Morgan, one-time editor of the Carroll Democrat.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Morgan, Harvey S.
EARLY SETTLERS: “It was common practice in 1832 for a farmer to mortgage his crop as security for a loan or debt. Harvey S. Morgan, residing on Bayou Macon, mortgaged the land on which he resided, together with a “mill, a gin and the crop of cotton and corn thereon growing” to secure James B. Prescott in the sum of $845.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Morgan, Julia (see Keene, Mrs. Alexander )

Morgan, Oliver Jones
CITIZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: “Judge Morgan of Ouachita Parish bought almost all of Ward 2 in East Carroll Parish for $1.25 an acre. Three Presidents of the U. S. signed the many deeds: Van Buren, Jackson, & Tyler. He owned what is now Wilton Plantation and Morgan Plantation, living on Wilton which was later owned by Norris Williamson. His only surviving child, Julia, married Alexander C. Keene, a widower of Stamboul Plantation. She and some of their children are buried on the south side of the Stamboul house, the present home of Mrs. Harry Shields.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Morman, Absolem

Morris, John

Mosley, F. W.

Muir, Mrs. David (see BIOGRAPHIES: Nicolson, Colonel)

Newmans
“In another section Miss Stone says, ‘A letter today from Mrs. Hardison. They and the Currys expect to move into the neighborhood in a few days. She writes gloomily of affairs on the river. The Newmans and the Grays are the only families left out there. Mat Johnson, after being beaten by his negroes, has come out to Floyd with fifteen other men and trying to raise a company to drive out the marauding Yankees. If only those backwoodsmen from across the Macon River would come over and help us.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Neal, Willie
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Willie Neal in 1873, according to the Lake Republican of June 7, served on the Board of Aldermen, when Ed Newman served as mayor.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Nelson, Eleanor (see Bonner, Nell Catherine)

Nelson, John Alfred & Christina Caroline
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Alfred and Christina Caroline Nelson arrived in America from Sweden shortly after the Civil War. Three years later they were married and came to live in East Carroll Parish in the 1st Ward. They were living on Dr. Wyly‘s plantation when their youngest child, John Julius was born.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Nelson, John Julius & Ollie (Hyland)
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Julius Nelson was born July 9, 1883, the youngest of the 5 children of Alfred Nelson and the former Christina Caroline Hilding. Young John attended Goodrich Landing School, a one-room building in the backyard, until age ten and then spent 2 yrs at Longwood School in the 4th Ward. The latter school was in the basement of his uncle’s home, and the teacher lived with the family. John later continued his education in Chemistry, Mathematics, and Architecture through courses offered by the International Correspondence School in Chicago. At age 19 he came to Lake Providence to work for the Fisher Lumber Company. Later he became one of the area’s outstanding building contractors.
In 1906, John married Hattie Ollie Hyland. She was the eldest of 13 children born to William Aloysius Hyland and the former Hattie Rozenna Paine. Ollie’s father was born in Vicksburg on Sept. 17, 1886, and attended St. Francis Xavier Convent. In 1902, the Hyland family moved to L. P., but returned to Vicksburg in 1905. During Ollie’s early married life she was very active in community affairs. She served for many years as Chairman of the local chapter of the American Red Cross, was a leader in the town’s Civic League and Garden Club, was one of the organizers of the Lake Providence P. T. A., and a worker in St. Patrick’s Mother’s Club. A long married life of 68 years ended at her death in 1974. 12 children were born to John & Ollie Nelson. All completed high school in the parish. Brief account of each, oldest 1st:
John William Nelson died in 1971. At the time of his death he was Estimator & Manager for the Manhattan Construction Co., in Mobile AL. Prior to moving to Alabama, he was employed by the E. C. Lumber Company. He married Elizabeth Wright of El Dorado, AR. They had 1 daughter, Jane Elizabeth, who is presently on the faculty of the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama.
Hattie Christina Nelson, after a business course at St. Vincent’s College in Shreveport, was employed by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in L. P. She later transferred to Vicksburg, MS., where she retired as Assistant Director Training Branch, Personnel Office, Vicksburg Dist., U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, in 1973, after 45 years of service. She now makes her home in Vicksburg.
Selma Sadie Nelson retired in 1975 after 35 years of service as Secretary with E. C. Agriculture Extension Service. She was a graduate of Draughan Business School, Houston. She married Max E. Stockner and after his death married Wade Burton, also deceased. She has one son, William Wade Burton, who is presently field engineer with the Standard Oil Company in Louisville, KY. Bill is married to the former Gale Susan Carter of Mer Rouge, La., and they are the parents of 2 daughters, Wendy Gale & Christina Belle.
Adele Elenora Nelson passed away in 1971. While attending business school in Bowling Green, KY, she met and married Don E. Madison. They made their home in Jasper, Indiana. They wee the parents of 2 daughters. Harriet Geraldine Madison passed away at 10 yrs old. Helen Katherine Madison married Carl Edrington and is presently employed by the 1st National Bank in Evansville, Indiana.
Helen May Nelson attended business college in Houston, Texas. She worked a time with the Doulutt & Ewin Construction Co., in Mobile AL, and then enlisted in the U. S. Navy. She retired from the Navy in 1964 and attended Northeast LA. State University and received a BA degree in English. She taught school 2 yrs., and is currently making her home with her father.
Ollie Hyland Nelson also attended Bowling Green business school, and prior to her marriage to Joseph C. Butler, worked for the Town of L. P. She presently assists her husband in his accounting work in L. P. 5 children were born to the Butlers. Helen Olivia Butler met her death at 6 yrs old. Virginia Josephine Butler is married to Gary Ryan and resides in Houston, Texas. Joseph Clarence Butler, Jr., is employed by the La Hwy Dept., Right-of-Way Div. Mary Hyland Butler is an L. S. U. senior medical technologist student, interning at Lafayette Charity Hospital. Selma Olivia Madison is a senior at Briarfield Academy (1976).
Myrtle Loleta Nelson completed a business course in Vicksburg, MS. She was working for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad in Mobile, AL, at the time of her marriage to Dillard Toomer. 2 daughters wee born to this union. Aymsley (Mary Constance) Toomer is a free lance writer in New York City; and Jean Gray is a teacher of special education in Mobile.
Thomas Alfred Nelson, a LA. Tech graduate, began his career with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in Vicksburg, MS., after spending 4 yrs in the U. S. Army Engineers in the Pacific during WWII. He is presently employed as Assistant Chief Operations Division by Lower Miss. Valley Division and Miss. River Commission of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. He married Agnes Miller of Waterproof, LA. They are the parents of a daughter a son. Linda Carol, married to John Denny of N. O., works for the State of LA Tax Div. in Baton Rouge. Thomas Alfred, Jr., is a sophomore at Hinds Jr. College.
Hyland Richard Nelson owner of Quality Cleaners in L. P., served 4 yrs as a bombardier in the U. S. Army Air Force during WWII. He attended the University of AL. He is married to Eleanor Keller of Bunke, LA. They are the parents of 3 sons and 2 daughters. William Richard is employed by Luther Hill and Association Construction Company in Dallas, TX. He is married to the former Sherry Coleman of Rayville, LA., and they have 2 daughters. Brandee Estell & Melissa Gray. Madeline Ann, married to Charles Herring of Lake Providence, is a teacher in Morehouse Parish. David Hyland is a student at LA Tech. Olivia Luana is a student at LA State University. Leo Franklin is a sophomore at Briarfield Academy.
Grace Hyland Nelson attended LA State University 2 yrs prior to enlisting in the U. S. Navy. After completing 2 yrs service, she married William L. Van Denburgh of Schenectady, New York, where they make their home. Their son, John William Denburgh, is a high school junior. Grace presently does secretarial work for the State of New York at the State University of Albany.
Brown Frederick Nelson, a graduate of LA. State University in Geology, is self-employed as a highway contractor in L. P. He served as a Corporal in the 42nd Rainbow Division of the U. S. Army during WWII and receive a Bronze Star for meritorious service. Brown is married to the former Bonnie Sue Layton. They have 6 children: Betty Sue Nelson is a special education teacher in Ouachita Parish. John Frederick Nelson is married to the former Marshal Allen of L. P. and is employed with the family company. They have 1 daughter, Kathryn Hope Nelson (John & Betty are twins). James Layton Nelson is in his junior year of Law School at LA State University. Donald Hyland Nelson and Nancy Kathryn Nelson are students at Briarfield Academy. Grace Ann Nelson is in the 7th grade at St. Patrick’s School.
Charlotte Ann Nelson met her husband, Ronald C. Knecht, while attending LA State University. The Knechts make their home in Houston, Texas. 5 sons were born to Charlotte and Ronald. Ronald Cyril Knecht, Jr., is doing graduate work in Bio-Chemistry at Texas A&M. William Nelson Knecht is a sophomore at Texas A& M. Michael Hale Knecht is a sophomore in high school. Steven died at birth. Hyland Steven Knecht is in the 5th grade.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.


Newman, Ed
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Willie Neal in 1873, according to the Lake Republican of June 7, served on the Board of Aldermen, when Ed Newman served as mayor.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Niblett, Joseph
Nicholson, Colonel & sister, Elizabeth
In 1869, Mr. & Mrs. David Muir and her brother , Mr. Robert Nicholson, and sister, Miss Elizabeth Nicholson, acquired and developed the plantations of Fairview and Carondelet on the river. They used the tenant system (of farming on "fourths" or "Halves"), as was customary after the Civil War. Frequent Mississippi River overflows nearly ruined their farming interest and the caving banks from shifts in the river currents steadily eroded their land holdings. In 1902, the family bought the Stone's place five miles west and built a home there. (More exactly, this location was three miles south of Stamboul where Mr. Leo Shields lived and one-half mile west of O'Hare's Switch--now Roosevelt.) The Amos Kent Amakers and Mrs. Muir lived here until 1906, when they and Colonel Nicholson moved to Lake Providence. Major Amacker continued to raise cotton on Way-a-Way Plantation near town and he also grew rice with Mr. Nicholson at Cottonwood Plantation.

Nicholson, Mrs. Elizabeth (see BIOGRAPHIES: Nicolson, Colonel)
Nicholson, Robert (see BIOGRAPHIES: Nicolson, Colonel)
Nodgren, Mrs. August

Norburg, A.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was a Saddler, A. Norburg, which shows a refection of the times.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

O'Conner, Mrs. Lillian Long
RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “Mrs. Lillian Long O’Conner said she had heard the Yankees reached the court house and burned a few records before being driven off. Her grandparents and mother lived just south of Floyd at the time.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

O’Brein, John
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

O'Conner, Mrs. Lillian Long
RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: “Mrs. Lillian Long O’Conner said she had heard the Yankees reached the court house and burned a few records before being driven off. Her grandparents and mother lived just south of Floyd at the time.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Oldham, Jane (see McIntyre, Mrs. John)

Oldham, Malcolm

Oliver, Peter
“Roads had begun to improve, and freight wagons were in vogue during dry weather. Overland mail routes were being established for the same reason. A mail route was established through this territory by the 1850’s which ran as follows: Deerfield (Delhi) to Floyd, 22 miles; postmaster, Peter Oliver, April 5, 1847. Floyd to Vista Ridge, 8 miles, postmaster, S. C. Floyd, December 11, 1851. Vista Ridge to Caldonia, 15 miles, postmaster, Amos Swator, October 19, 1854. In Oak Grove, John M. Stewart was postmaster in 1857.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Oliver, S. D.

Oliver, William L. S. D.

Osborn, ?

O‘Steen, Louise Hagel
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “reared 4 children; teacher, tutor” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Overstreet, Mrs.
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Owen, Jacob
“Jacob Owen, Louisville, KY., then East Carroll Parish, Louisiana Submitted by Mike Miller Among the self-made men of East Carroll Parish, La., who have carved out their own fortune and made their own way through life, none is more deserving of mention than Jacob Owen, who was born in Louisville, Ky., on April 9, 1820, the second of eight children born to Shapley and Lucy (Harding) Owen, natives of Jefferson county, Ky. The father removed to Louisiana in 1835, and at once engaged in planting, which calling he continued to successfully follow until his death, in 1866. He was eminently successful and accumulated a fortune valued at $500,000. Not only did he become well known throughout the parish in which he lived, but also throughout the entire northern part of the state, for he possessed unusually fine business qualifications, and was a man of exceptionally fine traits of character. He was a son of Jacob and Nancy (Ross) Owen, natives of Virginia, the latter being a relative of Governor Ross, of Texas. The Owens are of Welsh ascent, and are descended from Bracket Owen, who came to America at a very early day and settled in Kentucky during the pioneer days of that state. His old fort, or residence in Shelby county, is still standing. Two of his sons, the grandfather of Jacob Owen, and a brother, returned from Kentucky to Virginia between 1770 and 1780 for ammunition, making the entire trip alone, which was at that time considered a very daring undertaking, as the country was full of wild beasts and warlike Indian. Jacob Owen was reared in Louisville, Ky., and all the schooling he has ever received was before he was eleven years of age. He was then taken from school and put into a book store in Louisville, where he remained about two and a half years, after which he entered the largest dry goods establishment of that city, where, for two years he served in the capacity of bookkeeper. His education has been derived principally from hard, practical experience, for he never owned a school book, but notwithstanding this he is a thorough business man, and is a wide-awake, intelligent and enterprising gentleman While at work in Louisville he commanded as large, if not the largest sale, of any of his contemporaries. He is an omnivorous reader, and as a result is well posted on all the general topics of the day, and thoroughly up with the times. He came to Louisiana in 1840, since which time he has been identified with the interests of his adopted state, though he did not make it his permanent home until 1860. He then located on a plantation in Carroll parish, adjacent to his present home, where he has since devoted his attention to planting. In 1844 he was married to Miss Eliza Stewart, a native of Louisville, and a daughter of James and Mildred (Gray) Stewart, both of whom were born in Jefferson county, Ky. To their union five children have been born, only one of whom is now living, George S., who still resides with his parents. Mr. Owen is a man whose kindness of heart is proverbial. His manners are courteous and sincere and he is very generous and charitable, giving liberally of his means to enterprises of a worthy nature. His naturally fine mind has been strengthened and enriched by contact with the world and by self improvement, and he is an exceptionally intelligent and interesting conversationalist. Although Mr. Owen exercises his right of suffrage, he is not particularly interested in politics, much preferring to devote his attention to his private interests. Socially he is a member of the A. F. & F. M., and he and his wife, are members of the Episcopal church. Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana, (vol. 2), p. 294. Published by the Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, 1892.

From the Banner Democrat Newspaper- November 19, 1892 issue.
“Mr. Owen was born on the 1st day of April, in the year 1820, in Jefferson Co., Kentucky, where the Owen family had figured substantially and highly respected for a long numbers of years. At the age of eleven years, he from choice, started out to bullet the battle of life, and in five years, when he was sixteen, his industry and close attention to business had secured him a clerkship in the city of Louisville, second to none is salary and responsibility. Arriving at manhood he embarked in business for his own account, and was for a time prominent as a hardware merchant in Kentucky’s big city. His intelligence, affability, integrity and good judgment secured him a large patronage and numerous friends. His “Old Kentucky Home” was dear to him. There he spent his early days in the full and keen enjoyment of life, and no man that we have ever met to our knowledge had a clearer and more enjoyable appreciation of actual existence than Mr. Owen. # In Kentucky he was made a Mason according to the ritual of the Order, but Natures handy work had stamped him a Mason when bringing him into existence. He was a living example of the tenets of the Order. A hand ever open to molting charity, hospitable to a fault and a fast friend. If his life had been spared a few yeas longer Masonry would have been much benefited, because he was preparing to publish a book, “Masons of Kentucky and My Association With Them”. With him the preparation of the manuscript was strictly a labor of love, and no man was better fitted to discharge such a duty than he; but alas ‘twas not to be, he was called away. For 40 years or more Mr. Owen had resided in this parish, making occasional trips to the old home and scenes of his early life. Every one of the older inhabitants knew him well and estimated his worth as a true man among men, and a citizen of the highest and best type.”

From the Banner Democrat Newspaper- November 5, 1892 issue.
“Died.--One of our oldest and most highly esteemed citizens passed away on Friday morning last. Mr. Jacob Owen had resided in old Carroll for many years. He died at a mature age on the Gossyppia Plantation in the 5th Ward. His funeral took place on Saturday last at noon. The religious services over his remains were conducted by the Rev. R S. Isbell, the members of Pecan Grove Lodge following with their impressive Masonic funeral ritual.
Nearly all the people living in Bunch’s Bend were present with Providence and the lake neighborhood fairly represented. The presence of so many of our best people of both sexes to take part in the last sad rites was evidence that he was held in high esteem while living.
His body was placed in a vault temporarily, it being the intention of the family to remove it to its final resting place in Kentucky. We make this mere mention this week. A proper tribute of respect to our departed friend in our next issue.”

Owens, Shipley
“Settlers began to come in after the U. S.’s purchase of the territory out of which Carroll Parish was later carved. Among the first settler are the names of James Floyd, Hugh and Samuel White, John Millikin, and Shipley Owens. These surnames appear early in the records of West Carroll Parish also.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Parker, William Henry

Patrick, Edward Wilburn “Pop“ & Alma (McClendon)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Mr. & Mrs. William H. Patrick came to East Carroll from Winona, Miss, with their 3 sons, Henry Carr Patrick, William H., Jr., and Edward Wilburn, and one daughter, Alma, now Mrs. Patrick Jones. Henry Carr, a regular Army man, was killed in action during WWII. William received his Ph. D. degree as did his wife, the former Ann Martin, and both are professors at L. S. U. The 3rd son, Edward Wilburn, called “Pop”, has lived here and farmed continuously since 1943, except for 4 years in the U. S. Navy. He married the former Alma Ray McClendon in 1950, and they are the parents of 5 children: Robert Carr, Edward Wilburn, Jr., Douglas Alan, Debbie Ray, and Sandra Carolyn. Their children have continued to show an interest in farming. Active in civic and church affairs, both Mr. & Mrs. Patrick are members of many clubs, the Methodist Church, and various civic groups. Mr. Patrick served several years on the Parish School Board.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

“The LSU community lost one of its own recently in Boyd Professor Emeritus William H. Patrick Jr., who passed away Thursday, Aug. 5, of natural causes. He was 78 years old. His was a career notable for, not only its longevity, but also the list of honors and accolades garnered along the way that are by now, too numerous to list in their entirety. By the time he retired in 2003 – 50 years after becoming an LSU faculty member – he had been the longest-tenured faculty member at LSU.
“I know I speak for the entire LSU community, both past and present, when I say how deeply saddened we all are to learn of Dr. Patrick’s unexpected death,” said LSU System President and Interim Chancellor William L. Jenkins.
“A prominent scholar and researcher in his field, his work brought great distinction to LSU. His many contributions will continue to have an extraordinarily positive impact on LSU, our state and the nation. We extend our deepest condolences to Ruth and the entire family as they go through this difficult time. They will be in our thoughts and prayers.”
Born in Johns, Miss., Patrick was raised in Mississippi and Louisiana. After graduating from high school in 1944, he spent two years in the South Pacific serving in the military. He then attended Northeast Junior College in Monroe until 1948, when he transferred to LSU.
Patrick earned both his bachelor’s degree and doctorate in soil science from LSU before joining the faculty in 1953. In 1977, he moved his research facilities to the Center for Wetland Resources and established LSU’s Institute of Wetland Biogeochemistry. He served as director there for the next 23 years. In 1973, Patrick served as a NATO fellow.
In 1978, Patrick was named a Boyd Professor – the university’s highest honor. The following year he received an honorary doctorate from the University of Ghent in Belgium and would later receive one from the University of Beijing in China.
His major interests – biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen, carbon and sulfur in wetlands and redox chemistry processes in wetlands – won him much notoriety for his work. He was awarded research grants from the likes of the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Geological Survey.
He authored or co-authored more than 350 scientific papers, earning him recognition from the Institute for Scientific Information as one of the world’s most cited scientists in his field. He conducted projects on wetland ecosystems in Thailand, India, Indonesia, Egypt and the United States.
He recently served as chairman of an advisory committee for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment study of national water quality legislation, and he served on the National Academy of Sciences committee to study wetlands.
Together with his wife, Ruth, Patrick established the Patrick Lecture Series in 1999 through an endowment to the LSU Foundation. The endowed fund sponsors an annual lecture at LSU that alternates in the fields of Human Nutrition/Food Science and Wetland Sciences/Coastal Studies.
He was also the namesake of the William H. Patrick Jr. Outstanding Student Presentation Award. The award recognizes scientific excellence and professional presentation skills in oral and poster presentations given by graduate students at the International Symposia on the Biogeochemistry of Wetlands.
Patrick is survived by his wife of 52 years; his two daughters, Terry Patrick-Harris and Dr. Carol Patrick Pisarello; his two sons, William III and Dr. Henry Patrick; his 12 grandchildren, Catherine and Ben Harris; Meredith, Madeleine and William Patrick; Anna Carolina, Laura Elena and Nicolas Pisarello; Clayton, Hayes, Hank and Molly Patrick; and his sister, Alma Webb Jones of Monroe, and his brother, E.W. “Pop” Patrick, of Lake Providence.
He was preceded in death by his parents, William Hardy and Alma Webb Patrick, and his brother, Henry Carr Patrick, who was killed in World War II.
At the time of his unexpected death, Patrick was still an active athlete, playing singles tennis and Senior Olympic basketball. He was active at University United Methodist Church and, in 1979, established the World Hunger Scholarship fund, which provides scholarships for foreign scientists who commit to return to their country on graduation.
(see PORTRAITS OF L.P. FOLKS: Patrick “Pop”)

Patrick, Barbara (Johnson)
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “nursery school owner-operator, day-care center director” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Patrick, Martha (Wise)
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “musician, teacher, church leader” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Patrick, Nell (Hamilton)
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “secretary, office deputy sheriff” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Patten, Joseph & Ann M.
EARLY SETTLERS: “Some citizens of the parish became sufficiently affluent to invest their money. Joseph M. Patten and wife, Ann M. Patten purchased 75 shares of $100 each in the Union Bank of Louisiana which was created and incorporated by an act of the Legislature and approved on April 21, 1832. Honore Morancy and his wife, Eliza Jane Morancy, purchased 135 shares in the same bank, Catesby B. Minnis held 120 shares, and Alfred J. Lowry and wife, Cleora C. Lowry, owned 120 shares.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Patten, Thomas Roberdeau
(see also STORIES BY THE LOCAL FOLK: “Felix Bosworth and the Wedding at Arlington)

Patton Brothers
“Joseph May Patten and Thomas Roberdeau Patten moved from Fort Mirco now called Monroe, La to Lake Providence in 1831 so says Selina Blair Patten Wheat in her memoir she titled “Legacy to my Children” written in her hand in the years 1871 to 1872. The Pattens were raised in Alexandria, Va . Their father, Thomas Patten, was a merchant in that city till he removed without his family to Fort Minco to “check on a large body of land, 20,000 acres, which he paid taxes on for 30 years” and also to check on bounty lands given to his wife’s grandfather, General Daniel Roberdeau. The older brother, Joseph May, born in 1799 lived at Sherwood Plantation at Bunches Bend, La. The younger, Thomas Roberdeau, built the Arlington Plantation for his wife upon the death of Joseph May in 1841. At the age of 12 Thomas Roberdeau Patten went on a voyage to Europe with Capt. Crowdell, a family friend to Thomas Patten, the father. In 1818, Capt Crowdell, died of Yellow Fever in New Orleans. Thomas Roberdeau went to live with his father in Monroe. The father, Thomas Patten, died in .Monroe in 1820. Mary Roberdeau Patten, his wife, died in 1808, along with two infant daughters buried in the Presbyterian Meeting house yard in Alexandria, Va. Joseph May Patten had two daughters, Narcissi and Selina. Narcissa was still living in 1872, according to Mrs. Wheat. Narcissi had married Maj. John Brands Williams and lived at Sherwood Plantation in 1872. Selina Wheat, wife of the Rev. John Thomas Wheat, writes of five family members dying of Yellow fever in 1853 all in a fortnight. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Roberdeau Patten, Mr. Patten’s sister, the former Heriot Rozier Patten, who married John W. Miller. originally of Winchester, VA., Mr. Miller also died of yellow fever as well as their daughter Mary Miller who married a Mr. Dunn at Lake Providence. All that dying took place at “Arlington” Plantation, and I see from other sources the Arlington Plantation was sold that same year. Selina Wheat, Joseph May, Thomas Roberdeau, and Heriot, sometimes referred to as Harriet Rozier Patten had another sister, Mary Ann. She married Dr. Thomas Wolfe of Winchester Va Mary Ann. died of disease at the Rector Springs in Fauquier Co. Va. In 1825. The husband Dr. Wolfe fell off a horse and died in 1826 They left 3 orphaned children who spent time at Bunches Bend with their Uncle Joseph May Patten. 12yr old Lewis Wolfe died at Sherwood in 1833 his older brother Thomas Roberdeau Wolfe lived with his uncle Joseph May Patten till his death in 1841 then got a job with the British East Indian Co. and was gone for two years to work in India. Writing a journal now in the Southern Historical Collection UNC Library Chapel Hill. He eventually moved to New Orleans to practice law for 13 yrs. In the Book Gentle Tiger by Charles L. Dufore, La University Press 1957 Mr. Dufore says that Chatham Roberdeau Wheat applied to his cousin Mr. Wolfe to read the law. That Mr. Wolfe is Thomas Roberdeau Wolfe. The other Wolfe child, Mary de Neale Wolfe was adopted in kind by Selina and the Rev Wheat. But she too spent a year in Bunches’ Bend with her Uncle. Joseph May Patten attending school at Mrs. Thayer’s of Washington Mississippi. Mary de Neale Wolfe met Judge Morgan of New Orleans when she accompanied her Uncle to New Orleans when he was elected to the State Legislature. She became Mrs. Morgan upon the Judges death. She latter married a Mr. Harrison of Ohio, they moved to California she was still alive in 1872 when Selina Wheat wrote her memoir. The father, Thomas Patten’s merchant business is mentioned in “Artisans and Merchants of Alex., Va. 1780-1820” www.heritage-books.com . See also willowbendbooks.com “Obituary Notices, Alex Gazette 1784-1915” To look up the Wolfe children type on your homepage search Thomas Roberdeau, UNC Library will come up, click it and an abstract of the Thomas Roberdeau Wolfe comes up.” NOT SURE WHO SENT THIS TO ME

Pearl, Mary
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “bank employee, active in clubs, church” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Peet, Harmon

Peck, Samuel
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Pennington, W. F.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

EMAIL:
“A particularly interesting member of the Lake Providence Cadet’s (4th Louisiana) was William Pennington. He was a saloon keeper before the war and enlisted and was elected Lieutenant. He was wounded at Shiloh, and elected major. Later he became Lt. Colonel. He was a small man but was a brawler and a duelist.” TOM RICHEY

Perry, Alvin
BIOGRAPHIES: “The Alvin Perrys came to East Carroll in 1939. They first farmed on shares but soon purchased their own land. Although now semi-retired, Mr. Perry is still actively interested in farming. Their 4 children are Shelby, Buford, Stella, and Ruby. All finished high school at Monticello and the 2 boys are East Carroll farmers. Shelby bought 40acres in 1965, and is now farming some 1,000 acres in cotton & soybeans. He is married to Dorothy Blair and they have 2 daughters.
The 2nd son, Buford, 1st worked at Farmers Seen & Feed Co., but turned to farming in 1963. He now has 3,000 acres in cotton, soybeans, & rice. He is serving his 2nd term on the Parish School Board, is a member of the Farm Bureau Board, and received an award for his sponsorship of Scouting. He and his wife, the former Alice Sikes, have 2 daughters and 1 son. They are all active members of Elmwood Baptist Church.
Stella, the older daughter, 1st worked as a telephone operator and then married Carl Wilson. They and their 2 children live in West Carroll, where he farms and she works in a bank.
Ruby took business training after high school, was employed by News-Star World Publishing Corporation in Monroe for 5 years. She is married to Herbert Drummond and they, with their 2 daughters, live near Gonzales, Louisiana. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Phillips, Nancy Catherine (see Hood, Harbird)

Volume 3 page 147
Pilcher, Charles M. ,2nd Lt. Capt. Co. H, 6th La. Inf. En. June 4, 1861, Camp Moore, La. Roll July and Aug., 1861, Present. Elected 1st Lt. Aug. 26, 1861, Roll Sept. and Oct., 1861, Present. Roll May and June, 1862, Absent, wounded at Battle of June 27, 1862. Roll July and Aug., 1862, Absent, promoted by seniority July 17, 1862, to Capt. Wounded June 27, 1862, Gaines Mills, Roll Sept. and Oct., 1862, Present. Joined the Co. from absence on wounded furlough Oct. 9, 1862. Roll Nov. and Dec., 1862, Present on General Court Martial. Roll March and April, 1863, Present. Returned to duty from General Court Martial, April 27, 1863. Rolls May, 1863, to Aug., 1863, Present. Roll Sept. and Oct., 1863, Absent from Oct. 29, sick in Gen. Hospital, Richmond. Roll Nov. and Dec., 1862, On extra duty as Aide-de-Camp to Col. Monaghan, Commanding Brigade. Rolls Jan., 1864, to April, 1864, Absent on furlough, order of Gen. Lee. Roll to Aug. 31, 1864, Absent on detached duty in Louisiana. Born Lake Providence, La.” Found on the Computer Internet

EMAIL:
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 1999 18:59:50 -0600
From: Elaine Bay
Name: Charles Mason PILCHER _AKAN: Mason Pilcher _AKAN: Capt. Mason Pilcher Sex: M Birth: in Lexington, KY. Death: 1890 in Louisiana (probably New Orleans) Residence: Lexington, KY. Residence: Nashville, Davidson Co, TN. Residence: New Orleans, Orleans Par, La Occupation: Cotton merchant Note: Mason was born in or near Lexington, Kentucky. While still a "young man," he moved to Nashville, Tennessee. After staying in Nashville for "a few years," he next moved to Louisiana. He was a cotton merchant in New Orleans for many years. He married twice, once in Lexington and again Louisiana. His first son, Charles Mason Pilcher, became a lawyer and resided in Lake Providence, Louisiana, dying about 1890. One of several children by his second marriage was named Fielding Pilcher. He is reported to have "had a number of children;" however, there names do no seem to be available.
The reference to "a number of children" appears to be in error, unless he married at a very early age. His obituary, however, strongly suggests otherwise.”

“CAVEAT: Charles and his immediate descendants appear to be out of order and, in part, incorrect. Ferdinand Fielding Pilcher, a/k/a Fred Pilcher according to two an 1884 obituaries was the son of the late Mason Pilcher of New Orleans. He was, however, a native of Lake Providence. Fielding had move to Nashville sometime in February, 1884 from Lake Charles. He had taken ill in late July or early August and died 16 August of that year with his sister from Memphis, Mrs. Myers, and his mother in attendance. No other siblings or spouses are mentioned. There are two obituaries, the second one a short wire service type announcement. It includes a parenthetical notice at the end: "(New Orleans and Lake Providence, La. and Greenville, Miss. papers please copy.) Florida Pilcher, the daughter of Charles Mason Pilcher, Jr., the attorney, married in Greenville, Mississippi. Based on the obituary and the major facts that have previously come to light, it would appear that more likely than not, Fielding's mother was born in Greenville; and that the family was at least known there.
July 18, 1891 - Mrs. Coralie Wood Pilcher, wife of Mr. Mason Pilcher, died at their home in Bolivar County, MS., on Tuesday evening the 14th. Mrs. Pilcher has several relatives in this place who will deeply mourn her too early departure.” ELAINE Nall Bay (Rains Co., TX)

Pinkston, Burta O’Riley
BIOGRAPHIES: “Born in 1881 of directly-from-Ireland parents, Burta Reilly (the name became)lived on Winn Forest and Omega Plantations in Madison Parish as she grew up. Her father, John Hamilton O‘Riley, was reared by relatives, the Gilfoils of Omega.
After graduating from the Academy of the Sacred Heart in Waco, Texas, she taught school at Henderson and Mounds Station. She and Everett Pinkston of Transylvania were married in 1901. Their son Everett was only 6 when his father died, and Miss Burta and young Everett moved to their long-time home on 2nd Street about 1909.
Mrs. Pinkston taught herself stenography, and worked for attorney J. H. Gilfoil, Jr., and for E. J. Hamley and Son. She was the 1st woman Deputy Sheriff (1920), as well as the 1st pianist at the local movie house. She kept books for many businesses, taught piano and stenography, and was secretary of the Levee Board. When Martian Hamley became Speaker of the House in Baton Rouge, she was his assistant secretary, both then and later in the Senate. For a time she was the official registrar for servicemen in Madison Parish and she also served as treasurer for the town of L. P., La. She too, was a local representative for Dunn and Bradstreet. Just before retiring in 1955, she was an assistant cashier in the L. P. Bank.
She was organist at St. Patrick‘s Catholic Church for 20 years, a member of the choir, did secretarial work and bookkeeping for the church. Mrs. Pinkston staged and directed plays to raise money for the church, and did handwork for the bazaars.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Pittman Brothers
BIOGRAHIES: “Brothers John, Jim, J. Walter, and George Pittman all came early to E. C. Parish from Georgetown, Georgia. At one time they were in partnership owning and operating such plantations as Bolyn, Morganza, “Bank Tract“, and Wilton.
J. W., Sr., died on February 6, 1922. He had 2 sons: Stuart & Walter, and 1 daughter Dorothy (Mrs. Stephen Voelker). J. W. Pittman, Jr., married Florence Porter and they had 1 daughter, Katherine (Mrs. Luther Hill, Jr., of Montgomery, Alabama). Stuart, who married Mrs. Marian Dunn, had 1 son, Stuart, Jr., who has 2 sons and lives in San Antonio, Texas.
For many years the 2 brothers, J. W. & Stuart, operated the L. P. Hardware Store here. The farms had been sold after John & Jim Pittman died. In 1938, Stuart Pittman went into the implement business and Walter remained in the hardware store until his retirement.
J. Walter Pittman, Jr., is noted for his gentle manner, his love of people, and his devotion to his faith.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Pittman, Dorothy (see BIOGRAPHIES: Voelker, Stephen)

Porter, Florence (see BIOGRAHIES: Pittman Brothers)

Powell, Nellie (Graham)
BIOGRAHIES: “A native of E. C. Parish, Nellie Powell, assistant home demonstration agent in Madison Parish was awarded the distinguished service award by the national association. She received her B. S. degree from Tuskegee Institute and Master’s degree from A&M College at Prairieview, Texas. She taught home economics in E. C. prior to working in Madison. For 25 yrs she conducted home improvement contest, organized Garden Clubs, and was a church worker. Her husband Ben J. Powell was also a L. P. native.“ From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Powell, T. J.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Drays & Wagons business of L. T. Lemay & T. J. Powell, which shows a refection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

POWELL, Thomas J., Jr. Lake Providence. (East Carroll Parish)
Note #1: Thomas J. Jr Powell First Lieutenant, U.S. Army 358th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division Entered the Service from: Louisiana
Died: September 12, 1918 Buried at: Plot B Row 24 Grave 02
St. Mihiel American Cemetery Thiaucourt, France
Source: ABMC - Search the World War I database


Prentice & Henderson (see also Prentice, Horace)
Prentice, Horace
EARLY SETTLERS: “John Hash executed his promissory note to Prentice and Henderson in the sum of $583, and secured punctual payment by a mortgage of 8000 pounds of “ginned cotton now growing on Hash‘s place on Bayou Macon, which cotton is to be delivered by Hash at the gin on his place by the 1st day of March, 1833. It not paid on stated date, Prentice and Henderson shall be allowed to seize and sell the said cotton and all other cotton, whether in bales or otherwise, belonging to Hash.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

“Govy Hood and his sister Lucinda Hood Everett Chambliss (Mrs. Robert J.) in 1837 donated a site for the Carrollton Bank, lot #52, ‘to be used as a banking house or Office of Discounts and Deposits of the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad.’ Further requirements were that the building be of brick and not less than two stories high. Horace Prentice was president of the company and G. Skipworth was the cashier. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Prescott, Dr.
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Prescott, James B.
EARLY SETTLERS: “It was common practice in 1832 for a farmer to mortgage his crop as security for a loan or debt. Harvey S. Morgan, residing on Bayou Macon, mortgaged the land on which he resided, together with a “mill, a gin and the crop of cotton and corn thereon growing” to secure James B. Prescott in the sum of $845.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Prince, Berry & Balus
CITZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: “Two brothers, Berry & Balus Prince, played a part in the early development of the town. They sold a total of 1,251 acres to Keene and Martin, Surveyors, who reserved seven acres of this on which to lay out the town in 1835, and theirs included the first town square. There were 15 lots with 50-foot frontage and 211 foot depth back from the ‘levy’ (sic).” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Purdy, Charles
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Purdy, V. M.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Wharfboat of V. M. Purdy, which shows the reflections of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Quantrill, gang

Ragland, Judge Alwine Mulhearn Smith
Judge Alwine Mulhearn Smith Ragland had a reputation of being a strict, to-the-letter Judge, who kept a tight reign over her courtroom and the local attorneys on a short leash.  It is also said that she had the tendency to make up her mind on a case before hearing the evidence.  This resulted in many appeals during her time on the bench and many hard feelings.  But, this was a lady who commanded respect and had the accomplishments to back it up. 
She was born in 1913 in Monroe, Louisiana.  The fifth of seven children, Judge Ragland learned from an early age that hard-work was a necessity, particularly during the Great Depression.  Her family was hit hard but it did not stop the judge from graduating high school in 1930 and attending pre-law school at Principia College in St Louis, Missouri.  Judge Ragland continued her law degree at Tulane University.  She graduated 10th in her class in 1935 and was one of only a hand-full of women to attend college at that time.  In 1975, at the age of 62, she graduated from the National Judicial College in Reno, Nevada.  With the completion of her schooling in 1935, she returned to Madison parish to set up her law practice. 
Unfortunately, business was not good.  Soon, she found herself working a job with a Vicksburg company as a debts collector.  It offered no pay but did get her the attention necessary to build up a client base for her practice.  She was soon representing the poor and the black in various legal situations.    She married Leroy Smith in 1947 and had 2 children with him.  Her son, Leroy Jr., is now a practicing attorney in Madison parish.  After Smith's death in 1970, she married Percy Ragland in 1978 and moved to Lake Providence with him.  After his death in 1991, Judge Ragland packed up and moved back to Tallulah.
In 1990, at the age of 77, Judge Ragland was declared the oldest sitting Judge in the state of Louisiana.  She had been a 6th Judicial District Court Judge for 16 years.  In 1990, she lost re-election to a young Felicia Toney Williams.  Judge Ragland continued to be involved in the communities of East Carroll and Madison Parishes after her retirement from the bench.  Judge Ragland died April 30, 2006, at the age of 92.
Biographies and Memoirs of Northeast Louisiana

Raglands, William Betron
BIOGRAPHIES: “William Betron Ragland, Sr., long a familiar and popular citizen, was born Jan. 31, 1902, in Miss., the son of John & Lillian Wood Ragland. He first came here as a “cowboy” to bring some cattle to Homestead Plantation. He worked for the Holland Delta Company as manager of such plantations as Barber, Tyrone, and Avoca. In 1925, he and Cora Lee Cooper were married, and they were parent of 3 sons and 4 daughters: W. B. Ragland, Jr., a local attorney; Thomas E. Ragland, a farmer; and Marvin R. Ragland, employed in British Honduras; Mrs. Georgia Townsend, Mrs. Virginia Brown (both live in E. C.); Mrs. Lorraine Wilson, of New Orleans, and Jeannie Lorren of Covington. There are 14 grandchildren.
“Mr. Bill“ along with his farming interest, served as Deputy Sheriff for 38 yrs. He purchased Helena Plantation in 1941 at Bunch‘s Bend. He later also purchased Alabama Plantation. Mrs. Ragland entered public life as a member of the School Board, representing her Ward for many years until her retirement in 1970. She has also been active in civic and community affairs.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

EMAIL:
Randles, Teague & Susan (Freeman)
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 1999 22:05:22 EST
From: NPParrish@aol.com
“My Randles was Bettie Randles, daughter of Teague Randles and Susan Freeman.
They lived in West Carroll (or East) Parish. Betty was married to John Bolding, son of William Roland Bolding. They lived in Kilbourne, which is in West Carroll Parish.
Bettie's birth and death dates which are b. July 05, 1883 d. April 21, 1929.
My grandfather was Bolding. I am trying to get information on his father, John Bolding, and his grandfather, William R. Bolding. I have found some in the census of 1850 for MS., but we don't have any access to any Louisiana census here in KY.”

“Lafayette Simmons in the 1870 Census with Thomas Randles’ household, turns out that I also have Seamans/Simmons and he is one of the brothers to my great-great grandmother!” NOEL

Reed, Mary (Hall)
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “1st local director of Public Welfare” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Ridley, Jim
“William Pitt Kellogg, a colored man under the domination of northern Yankees, was elected governor of the state in 1872. He had vast appointive powers, in fact, he appointed at will, men for man offices. He appointed Jim Ridley, a native of Carroll Parish , living near Floyd, as representative for Carroll Parish at one time. He appointed Harrison Henson as magistrate for Ward 2, and Sheriff for Carroll Parish. Leon LeFevre said these colored appointees west of the Macon never served. Magistrate Henson came to Floyd to hold court one day. After Ace Anderson held a conference with him, he departed without holding court and never returned in the capacity of magistrate again. “ Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

EMAIL:
Rea, Captain Richard Nathan Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 21:03:47 EST
From: LucyRea@aol.com
“Hi: My name is Laurette Russell, and I am the daughter of James Lawrence Ralph & Lucy Rea. My mother was born and raised in Lake Providence. She was the daughter of Capt. Richard Nathan Rea & his 2nd wife, Pallie Kemp Belden - and the granddaughter of Albert Goodrich Belden and Lucy Jane Holland. I am almost certain that both these families are buried in an iron-fenced plot in the old Providence Cemetery.
Capt. Rea was first married to Anna Thomas Chapline, daughter of Moses Chapline, and it is possible that the Chaplines were also buried in the same cemetery. Anna died at Robertdale Plantation in ca. 1890.
Albert G. Belden was a planter and a merchant in Lake Providence, and in the 1880's served as sheriff of East Carroll Parish. His wife, Lucy Jane, was the daughter of Newton and Rosina (Bittleman ) Holland. The family moved to Floyd, LA ca. 1850 from Holly Springs, Ms.
I am still trying to pinpoint the deaths of Newton and Rosina - when and where. It is very possible that Newton died during the War - but both he and Rosina might have ultimately moved from Floyd to Lake Providence and are buried there. (Lucy Rea was my mother's maiden name) LAURETTE (LucyRea@aol.com)
I do remember hearing that he committed suicide after having lost the election in 1896, and my mother told me that the family never, ever spoke of the way he died. His story was an interesting one, in that he enlisted in the union army in Joliet, Illinois. He was stationed in Carroll Parish, and eloped with my great grandmother, Lucy Jane Holland during the war. My mother was born and raised in E. C. Parish. She lived on Alabama Plantation, which was taken over by the Miss. River long, long ago. Her father was Capt. Richard Nathan who moved from Meridian, MS, and lived in the parish until his death in 1924. Mother was one of three graduates of the local high school during WWI. She worked in the pharmacy department of both Guenard Drug Store, and I believe, Providence Drug Store. She remained in L. P. until her marriage to my father, James Lawrence Ralph in 1919, after which they opened a drug store in Eudora, AR. Both her mother and father are buried in Providence Cemetery.”
Note: “The family lived either "in" or "adjacent to" the jail. My family was there from the early 1850's until 1924 .

Rentz, Myrtle (see Mitchiner, Sam Kirkpatrick & Myrtle (Rentz)

Rhodes, Madora N.
Mrs. Madora N. Rhodes was born in New Orleans April 9, 1853; united in marriage with Thomas B Rhodes, July 14, 1870. Of the union two daughters were born, Nannie and Bessie. For many years she suffered great physical pain, but through it all has borne her troubles and afflictions with patient fortitude and Christian registration. She was reared in the Methodist Church and exemplified in her life the best and purest traits of a sincere and earnest Christian. She was a devoted friend, a loving and faithful wife, a careful and conscientious mother, an affectionate daughter, and devoted sister, she was true in all the relations of life. One daughter attended school in Denver, Colorado and the other in Rockford, Illinois, when telegraphed were able to attend the funeral. Biographies and Memoirs of Northeast Louisiana

Richardson, James
Mr. James Richardson is said to have refused the offer by an English syndicate of $22,000,000. For his cotton plantations. And for the benefit of the rising generation it may be well to repeat here what has been commented on before, that his father, who accumulated all this wealth and much more, invented in other properties, clerked in a country store in North Carolina, when he was well up in teens for the magnificent salary of $50 a month. Biographies and Memoirs of Northeast Louisiana

Richardson, John A.
“Mr. John S. Richardson, Epps Plantation, Richland Parish, La. is reported to be the largest cotton raiser in the world, he has six plantation covering 40,000 acres or nearly 77 square miles, 20,000 acres are under cotton cultivation, yielding about a bale to an acre which together with the seed brings at present prices $1,220,000. His largest plantation is the Dahomy Plantation which is in Mississippi, comprising of 33,000 acres or 51 square miles. He is also a heavy owner of the Wessen Cotton Mills, located at Wessen, Miss. It is reported that recently an English Syndicate offered Mr. Richardson $2,500,000. over and above par value of his cotton property which was promptly refused.” Biographies and Memoirs of Northeast Louisiana

Richardson, T. N. T.
STATE RECORDS OF INCORPORATION: “Beginning at Chambliss‘ lower line on the river running thence north to the river Bayou, thence west, four hundred yards, thence south, including the Academy and T. N. T. Richardson‘s house, to the lower corner of Chambliss‘ back line, thence east to the beginning, including 500 acres, to be under the direction of the mayor and aldermen of said town of Providence or a majority of them. “(March 6, 1848) From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Resse, Adolph
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Richards, J. S.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Richardson, Doctor
“Aug 26, Captain Lee and 200 guerillas raided plantations south of Transylvania leased by Hiram B. Tebbetts, killing 4 white men and several colored people. In retaliation Webber took Doctor Richardson as hostage for the return of a clerk named Webster, who had been kidnapped by Lee. The Federal force, 230 mounted Negroes under the command of Major C. H. Chapin, 3rd U. S. Colored Cavalry, destroyed a few loyalists property, crossing into Pin Hook and Floyd burning those villages and killing 12 Confederate partisans in the process. Lee offered no resistance to Chapin, and the Union force returned to Goodrich’s Landing.” Reference: Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Richardson, Rosie Mary Banks (see BIOGRAPHIES: Banks, Leandrew)

Ridley, Jim
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Jim Ridley, who lived near Floyd, was a representative. Harrison Tyler of Bunch’s Bend was president of the School Directors.“ From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Roberts, Benjamin D.

Rodge, Vivian
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “secretary to clerk of Police Jury” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Rollins, ?“
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buying from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Rose, Mary
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “organist at Grace Episcopal Church, club-woman” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Ross, E.

Rous, William
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business merchants were A. Violett, F. M. Harp, and William Rous in Lake Providence. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Rousseau, Richard
CITIZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: “Richard Rousseau was a surveyor who drafted the plant for the first town of Providence for which any map is available. This plan is dated 1833, and a copy of the map appears in the chapter on the town.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

TOWN OF PROVIDENCE: “A map of the town, found in the same record book (Conveyance Book A., Map #1) was drawn by civil engineer Richard H. Rousseau.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.

Rushing, Pleasant Monroe
BIOGRAPHIES: “William Peavy Rushing‘s father, Pleasant Monroe Rushing, a pioneer logger, brought his family by wagon to Iberville Parish from Miss.
W. P. Rushing became a successful building contractor and was know throughout the Ark-La-Miss for his skill. He excelled in church construction and considered it a special “calling” to build a House of God. He built the 1st Baptist Church educational building in L. P. in 1947, and returned in 1952 to construct the sanctuary.
After suffering a heart attack in 1953, he decided to make Lake Providence his home. Because of his love of fishing “Bee” Rushing bought 6 acres of land fronting the lake located near the mouth of the chute from the Schneider Estate. He built a home of cypress here and named it Rushwood.
Mrs. Rushing is the daughter of Beulah Baird of Gibson Co., TN and Roy Kimberlin Shepherd of Greenville, Miss. She worked for many years as reporter and society editor for the Banner Democrat, and presently serves as correspondent and feature writer for the Monroe Morning World and Vicksburg Post. In semi-retirement, Mrs. Rushing began creating had=made silk organza keepsake bridal bouquets “By Millie”.
The Rushings have 1 son, W. P., Jr. a captain with United Airlines. In 1971, he was selected as Outstanding Pilot of the Year of the International Air Show in Parish, France. He is presently (1976) serving as Flight Manager for United Airlines, O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. The younger Rushings are parents of 1 son a and 1 daughter, Bill, III, and Carol. His wife was the former Joane Brown of Greenville, Miss, Miss.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.


Rusk, Samuel
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horance Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Salemi, Gaetano & Grace
BIOGRAPHIES: “John or Gaetano Salemi and Grace (Grazia) DeVincent were married in Cefalu, Italy in 1899. They came to New Orleans on their honeymoon and in the same year decided to make Lake Providence their home. Mr. Salemi, who maintained his Italian citizenship, had a grocery store on the corner of Lake & Scarborough Streets. Of their 12 children, two died in infancy. A son, Frankie, was killed in an auto accident in 1936. A daughter, Annette, (Mrs. Sam Domino, Jr.) died in 1968. The other children are: Theresa (Mrs. Charles Cesare of Vicksburg, MS.), Lucie (Mrs. Jasper Titone), Lena (Mrs. Joe R. Forte, Jr., of Lake Village), Kelly Salemi of L.P., married to the former Edna Waters, Vincent Salemi of Los Angeles, CA., whose wife is the former Marie Morrison, Johnnie Salemi, married to Mae Carmouche and lives in Norco, LA., Gracie Salemi and Salvador Salemi of L.P., La. 3 of these still live in the family home on Sparrow Street; Lucie, Gracie, and Salvador. Salvador is part-owner of a drug store, and Gracie has worked at the Terral Clinic for the past 24 years.
3 of the boys served in WWII. Johnnie was wounded in the European theater. Vincent served with the Army in the Canal Zone in Europe. Salvador was also with the Army in the European theater.
The Salemi‘s never lost contact with their homeland and returned to Italy with their children for annual visits. The parents, as well as the older children, continued to speak Italian in the home.
On April 24, 1960, this couple was honored by the Bill Leyden TV show, “It Could Be You“, on the occasion of their 61st wedding anniversary At that time there were 9 children, 16 grandchildren & 15 great-grandchildren.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Sanderson, George
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Sanford, B. A.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Sanders, ?

Sartain, Cain (colored)
A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. All office were filled with colored people, Cain Sartain was senator, followed by Jackworth Clay. Jim Gardener was representative for awhile.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Cain Sartain of Goodrich Landing was the first representative, and then Senator about 1875. Jim Gardner was also representative but he probably was from West Carroll. Jacques A. Gla, President of the Board of School Directors, lived on the lake front, J. R. Grimes was a pastor and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Nicholas Burton served as Sheriff and the Secretary Treasurer of the School Board.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

EAST CARROLL MARRIAGES: Sartains
26 Nov. 1868 Sartain, Cain Young, Mahala
13 Oct. 1898 Sartain, Mary Rodgers, Richard

Savage, Elizabeth (Mrs.)
“Miss Kate Stone (writer of “Brokenburn” her diary) mentions Mrs. Elizabeth Savage going to Floyd frequently in 1862. I assumed the Savage Plantation was nearer the Macon River than most of the others. She said, ‘Mrs. Hardison was telling us of Mrs. Abe Curry’s trip on horseback to Floyd. She must be crazy.’ A footnote said this was fifty miles round trip and mentioned Floyd being the county seat of Carroll Parish. There were federal troops in this area trying to stir up trouble among the slaves which was the reason Miss Stone thought Mrs. Curry’s trip hazardous.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
Scott, ?

Scarborough, David B.
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Scarborough, Thomas
STREETS AND ADDITIONS: “Scarborough Street was named for Thomas C. Scarborough, a Judge who lived here from 1856 - 1860. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1852, and a member of the State Legislature. Mr. Scarborough was a civil engineer by profession. He served at age 50, as a Captain in the 25th Louisiana Regiment during the Civil War.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Schneider, William Henry & Fredericka (Hall)
BIOGRAHIES: “William Henry & Fredericka Hall Schneider were married in Germany and came to Philadelphia, PA., in the 1830‘s. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Schneider, William Henry, Jr., came to live in L. P. He served in the Confederate Army and fought in the Seige of Vicksburg He married a local girl, Mary E. Tomkins, and their 2 children were Margaret Barker and Frederick Hall Schneider (see below). At one time they lived in Minden, LA., where Mr. Schneider edited The Minden Democrat. Mrs. Schneider died there, and W. H. Schneider and children returned to L. P. in 1881, where he served as a Commission Merchant and Landing Keeper on the Mississippi River. News accounts refer to him as mayor, and again as a partner with V. M. Purdy as commission merchants.
(1)Frederick Hall Schneider graduated from L. S. U. where he lettered in football, was a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity, of the “L“ Club, and was a Cadet Captain. He operated a grocery store with his brother-in-law, W. S. McGuire. Frederick Hall Schneider married Anna Mary Davis, and their children were Edward Davis, William Henry (died in infancy), Nan Davis, Frederick Hall, Jr., and Margaret Barker Schneider (died in infancy). During his career he was a member of the School Board and President for 12 years, Commissioner of the 5th District Levee Board and President for 12 years, member of Knights of Pythias, of the Shriners, of Phi Kappa Phi, of Rotary Club, President of the local L. S. U. Alumni, on the Board of Directors of the 1st National Bank, member of the Board of Directors of O’Neil McNamara Hardware Company (Vicksburg), and a member of the L. P. Town Council. For 44 years he operated a hardware business, farmed and owned ginning interest. He acquired 2,800 acres of land. His promotion of flood control led the 5th District to present him a Shriner’s ring and a fine watch “in appreciation of his valuable services in connection with Flood Control Legislation.”
Frederick’s wife was Anna Mary (Nan) Davis, daughter of Edward Hugh and Julia Blackburn Davis. (see BIOGRAHIES: Davis, Edward High & Julia (Blackburn)
(1A) Schneider, Edward Davis, son of F. H. & Nan, was a graduate of L. S. U., a member of Pi Kappa Alpha and of the football team and the “L” Club. He and Jessica Atherton Graham were married in 1922. (see also BIOGRAPHIES: Graham, Harry) Their 2 sons were Edward Davis, Jr., and Harry Graham. Mr. E. D. Schneider served on the Episcopal Church Vestry and as Treasurer & Superintendent of the Grace Church school. He was a member of Knights of Pythias, the Rotary Club (it’s 4th president), local president of L. S. U. Alumni. He served on the Board of Directors of the 1st National Bank, the North LA Building & Loan Association, the West Carroll Bank, the O’Neill McNamara Hardware Board, and was President of the local School Board.

(2) Schneider, Frederick Hall “Tedd”, younger brother of F. H., also graduated from L. S. U., in engineering, and was a member of the football squad and the “L” Club. After graduation he joined F. H. Schneider & Sons to manage the wholesale radio and electrical department, and operated Sherwood Plantation. He served on the Police Jury, the Grace Episcopal Church Vestry and was a director of the Federal Land Bank Association. He and his wife, the former Sara Regenold, daughter of Fred Porter and Gussie Henderson Regenold, were the parents of 4 children: Sara Ann, Frederick Hall III, Gay and Nanette. Their son, Frederick Hall III, is an L. S. U. graduate, and farms on Sherwood Plantation where he and his wife, the former Constance Allen, and their 6 children make their home. He is active in farming, church and civic affairs.

(2A) Schneider, Edward Davis, Jr. “Ned”, older son of the Edward Davis Schneiders, attended LA Tech, was a member of Pi Kappa Phi, and farmed and managed Star Arlington & Winterfield Plantations. Later he worked for the East Carroll Conservation Service, and became a professional photographer. He married Betty Lorraine Johnson, daughter of James Louis and Elouise Thompson Johnson, and their children were Edward Davis III, and Mary Elouise Schneider. He served on the Episcopal Vestry and was President of the L. P. Junior Chamber of Commerce.

(2B) Schneider, Harry Graham, younger brother of “Ned“, 2nd son of Edward Davis Schneider, attended L. S. U. & LA Tech. He was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha. He joined the firm of F. H. Schneider & Sons, Inc., in 1947 and became manager of the hardware and sporting goods dept. In 1968, the company dissolved, ending 70 yrs of service. He joined the administration of the 1st National Bank in 1965, first as a member of the Board and then assistant to the President. Since 1970 he has been President. He was on the Parish School Board for 12 yrs. He is a member of Grace Episcopal Vestry; Past Master of Masonic Lodge; past President of the Country Club; Director of North La Federal Savings & Loan, and director of Financial Security. He is married to the former Mary Ellen Johnson, daughter of the James L. Johnsons, and their sons are Harry Graham, Jr., James J., and Samuel Lowry Schneiders.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Schneider, Jessica (Graham)
BIOGRAHIES: “Born Jessica Graham, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Harry Graham at Transylvania Plantation, she has lived in the parish all of her life. She was educated at Dana Hall in Wellesley, Massachusetts. She married E. D. Schneider and their two sons are E. D., Jr. and H. Graham Schneider. She has been active in her church, Grace Episcopal, and served as President of the Women’s Auxiliary of Grace Church. She was twice president of the Garden Club, treasurer of the L. P. P. T. A., and a member of the American Legion Auxiliary. Succeeding her husband in the insurance agency, she has been an active businesswoman. She has served in the highest State office of the Daughters of the American Revolution.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Selby, Louis
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Sellers, ?
Sessum, Richard
“Gale Thompson told me that Richard Sessum related to him that Frank James brought his mother the first cook stove they had ever seen. He reported buying the stove in Delhi, and he said he wanted to present it to the best cook that ever set a table. Whether he purchased the stove or took it, no one ever knew. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Sessums, Blake

Setton, John (pirate gang member, "Little Harpe")

Shaw, ?

Shepherd, Roy Kimberlin (see, BIOGRAPHIES: Rushing, Pleasant Monroe)

Shields, Jessie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “owner of dress shop, hostess of Stamboul” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Shoo, John W.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “John W. Shoo was a deputy sheriff and a constable appointed by Governor John McEnery.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Simmons, Henry
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Henry Jones remembered favorably by many was a merchant. In 1896 he erected a nice residence south of the courthouse. Today the house is occupied by his son-in-law and daughter, the Henry Simmonses. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Skipworth, G.
Govy Hood and his sister Lucinda Hood Everett Chambliss (Mrs. Robert J.) in 1837 donated a site for the Carrollton Bank, lot #52, ‘to be used as a banking house or Office of Discounts and Deposits of the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad.’ Further requirements were that the building be of brick and not less than two stories high. Horace Prentice was president of the company and G. Skipworth was the cashier.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Smith, John
“The following is an example of land dealing by absentee land owners after Louisiana became a state in 1812. The Baron de Bastrop and the John Adair claim are both mentioned.
The land transaction in which the Adair claim is mentioned is found in old Notarial Book A., page 60, ‘John Smith, resident of Baton Rouge to Charles Hubb, resident of Ouachita Parish, a deed to 950 acres of land, being a part of Baron de Bastrop grant, known and distinguished in the Ludlow Map of the State of La., to be a part of General John Adair’s claim, deed by said Adair to Sevard Claiborne and purchased by said Smith, as it will appear in Recorder’s Office, Parish of Ouachita, consideration $1200.00. This land the western half of Section 8 and the whole Section 5, agreeable to the platt and survey executed by me, John Gilmore, in the beginning of Year 1822 and deposited in the Judge’s offices of the parish of Ouachita and Baton Rouge, this the 24th day of May, 1822.’
On the same page we find John Gilmore purchasing from John Smith section 7 and the half of section 8 west of Bayou Macon on April 11, 1822. Thus, we know these two land transactions involved a part of what is now West Carroll Parish and we also see that dealing or speculating in land by absentee landowners began early in our history and continued for over a hundred years.”
From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

EMAIL:
Spurlock, Drury
From - Tue Jul 14 10:20:55 1998

“The people I am trying to locate are the Spurlocks. Drury Spurlock and wife Lucy Fuqua. Their children: (1) Joseph, wife was Louise Segrest, (2)Eliza Jane, husband Charles H. Webb, (3) Martha, husband Thomas Jefferson Collins, (4) Robert, wife Louisa M. Haywood,
(5) James, wife Sigis M. James, (6) Drury F., wife ?, (7) David, wife California Keller, (8 & 9) children Joseph and Jackson who died as young children, probably around 1860-1870.
The Spurlock family came into the Carroll Parish area of Louisiana before 1830 from Wilkinson Co., Mississippi.
I have been trying to connect this A.W. to my William A. Blount. Do you have any information of the Wade Plantation and the Hall's Plantation? VIRGINIA (Stewart)

Stanford, Nancy (see Hood, Mrs. Harbird Hood)

Stephens, Tobias and Alice (see Delony, Edward J.)

Stewart, Benjamin
Bonnidee Settlement was opened up in the 1850’s. This settlement was located just west of Boeuf River on the Prairie Mer Rouge and Lake Providence road. Pin Hook (Oak Grove) was on the same road. In the late 1840s and 1850’s vast immigration from the east to the west took place and many of these travelers crossed the Mississippi River by ferry at Vicksburg, came up the river road to Lake Providence and then crossed the Macon and Boeuf swamps over the Prairie Mer Rouge, Lake Providence road. Sometimes there would be 25 or 30 wagons in the train, according to C. C. Davenport’s Looking Backward”. These travelers could not go far in one day in rainy weather. Often they camped within a short distance from where they camped to night before. A few stopped to settle on the Macon Ridge. Those that crossed both swamps would stop in Prairie Mer Rouge buy supplies, thus adding to the economy of the little town.”
These settlers were like the usual run of people. Women worked hard along with their slaves, saved their money and bought more land and slaves, but there was a question whether or not the land grants made by Spain would be honored by the Unites States government, from France. This caused a few settlers to discontinue improvements on the farms while others left. One of those leaving was my great-grandfather, Ben Stewart, who had come from Alabama in a covered wagon; but, as soon as he found that the Baron de Bastrop’s heirs were suing the federal government in an effort to clear the land title, he decided not to get mixed up in such land. He was on his way back to Alabama when he found land for sale cheap in Smith County, Mississippi, and there he purchased a section and settled down. Had he stayed in Morehouse, I could have claimed to be a native, perhaps, rater than an immigrant.”
[See also BIOGRAHIES: Davenport, Isaiah ]
“One of these early settlers was Benjamin Stewart, my great-grandfather. He came from Alabama to take up the 400 acres of land for himself and his new bride. These settlers came to this new land with every intention of building permanent homes, owning a plantation, and establishing a good life. Despite these lofty aims, these settlers endured many hardships.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Stewart, Franklin

Stewart, John M.
“Since post offices during this time were usually in the homes of the postmaster, and farmers of this area always named their farms or plantations, we can assume John M. Stewart’s home was called Oak Grove. I did not find land in his name during the 1850’s.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

“Roads had begun to improve, and freight wagons were in vogue during dry weather. Overland mail routes were being established for the same reason. A mail route was established through this territory by the 1850’s which ran as follows: Deerfield (Delhi) to Floyd, 22 miles; postmaster, Peter Oliver, April 5, 1847. Floyd to Vista Ridge, 8 miles, postmaster, S. C. Floyd, December 11, 1851. Vista Ridge to Caldonia, 15 miles, postmaster, Amos Swator, October 19, 1854. In Oak Grove, John M. Stewart was postmaster in 1857.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Stewart, Onley

Stone, Kate

Stowers, Josephine Irish (see BIOGRAPHIES: VanFossen, Samuel)

Surles, Alphy Pittman & Margaret (Frye)
BIOGRAHIES: “Alphy Pittman Surles moved to the parish from Georgia. He 1st worked for his mother‘s brother here, James G. (Jim) and J. Walter Pittman, Sr. Later he managed Bellagio Plantation. “Mr. Pitt” was a pioneer cattleman in the parish, owned & operated a slaughter house at Alsatia. With Mr. Bob Nicholson, he harvested the first local rice crop. He helped back the Rust brothers in their development of the cotton picker. He and Robert Amacker were charter members of the LA Farm Bureau and both held offices in the organization. As co-founder of Hollybrook Gin, he also helped establish the Hollybrook Flour Mill, and owned an interest in the Hollybrook Mercantile Company. With a partner he started the International Harvester Company, and was also a dealer in horses and mules. He owned a large section of the old Bagdad Plantation on the lower edge of town on south Sparrow & Madden Drive.
He married Blondell Hawk and their children were: James, Albert Pittman, Jesse Walter, Evelyn, and Martha (now Mrs. Sam Homola). Walter became a Justice of the Peace. He married Margaret Frye, and they have 2 daughters, Blondell & Eugenia (now Mrs. Stephen Ham) and 2 grandchildren. Blondell Surles has not married. She works as an archeologist at nearby Poverty Point. Descendants still in East Carroll are his sons, Albert and J. Walter. There are 4 grandsons and six great-grandchildren.
Margaret became managing editor of the Delta News in Lake Providence in 1963. Although an unsuccessful candidate for State Representative in 1975, she was still instrumental in obtaining a Vocational-Technical School for this area, according to Ed Steimel, then Director of P. A. R. She is a personal friend of Governor & Mrs. Edwin Edwards, and has often been a guest at the Governor‘s mansion.
Later Mr. Pitt brought his 2 younger brothers, T. L. & Cluren, to E. C. from Georgia. He and T. L. purchased the New Transylvania Plantation, and Cluren managed Way-a-Way Plantation for the Amackers.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Sutton family
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Swator, Amos
“Roads had begun to improve, and freight wagons were in vogue during dry weather. Overland mail routes were being established for the same reason. A mail route was established through this territory by the 1850’s which ran as follows: Deerfield (Delhi) to Floyd, 22 miles; postmaster, Peter Oliver, April 5, 1847. Floyd to Vista Ridge, 8 miles, postmaster, S. C. Floyd, December 11, 1851. Vista Ridge to Caldonia, 15 miles, postmaster, Amos Swator, October 19, 1854. In Oak Grove, John M. Stewart was postmaster in 1857.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Sweet, Marion A.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Henry Jones remembered favorably by many was a merchant. In 1896 he erected a nice residence south of the courthouse. Today the house is occupied by his son-in-law and daughter, the Henry Simmonses, Charles Hicks, another sheriff and member of the School Board, is mentioned in records for 1875. David Jackson was Clerk of Court and Marion A. Sweet was recorder.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Swoope, Mrs. L. F., Jr. (see Cammack, Abner Sam)

Taylor, Mattie

Tebbetts, Hiram B.
Aug 26, Captain Lee and 200 guerillas raided plantations south of Transylvania leased by Hiram B. Tebbetts, killing 4 white men and several colored people. In retaliation Webber took Doctor Richardson as hostage for the return of a clerk named Webster, who had been kidnapped by Lee. The Federal force, 230 mounted Negroes under the command of Major C. H. Chapin, 3rd U. S. Colored Cavalry, destroyed a few loyalists property, crossing into Pin Hook and Floyd burning those villages and killing 12 Confederate partisans in the process. Lee offered no resistance to Chapin, and the Union force returned to Goodrich’s Landing. Reference: Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Templeton, Colonel

Terral, John
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Terrel, formerly of Farmerville, after serving as a lieutenant during WWII, moved here and with his brother, Dr. F. M. Terral, purchased a retail seed and feed store. Mrs. Terral is the former Marguerite Labat of France.
In the Army he was a member of the 9th Armored Division in Europe. He received the Purple Heart and Silver Star. During the Korean conflict he was recalled to duty to help train troops. As president of the Terral-Norris (E. M. Norris, partner) Seed Compnay, John helped develop a market for singletary peas and also helped introduce soybeans to this area. The Lake Providence Port Elevator on the Miss River was built by his company, and furnishes a market for soybeans in Louisiana & Arkansas. The Terral operations have expanded into neighboring towns and states. John Terral has also served as President of the LA Seedmen’s Association.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Terry, James

Thompson, Gale
“Gale Thompson told me that Richard Sessum related to him that Frank James brought his mother the first cook stove they had ever seen. He reported buying the stove in Delhi, and he said he wanted to present it to the best cook that ever set a table. Whether he purchased the stove or took it, no one knows.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Tompkins, Mary E. (see BIOGRAPHIES: Schneider, William Henry & Fredericka)

Trappington, Alex

Trass, General & Mary (Jordon)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Remembered here are the late General Trass and his wife, Mary Jordan Trass, who were the parents of 7 sons and 5 daughters. Their son, General, Jr., a graduate of Southern University and Tuskegee, is at present the principal of the Lake Providence High School. Prior to that he was a classroom teacher, principal of G. W Griffin High School, & a soldier for 3 years.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trass, Mrs. General T., Jr.
Elizabeth Brannum Trass who for a while was teacher but returned to manage the Brannum Funeral Home. She had a Master‘s degree +30hrs., and was chosen “Lady of the Lake“, by the East Carroll Advisory Council in 1974. She has also been recognized for “Distinguished Christian Service to the African Methodist Episcopal Church” by the Dept. of Worship & Evangelism. Her husband, General T. Trass, Jr., was principal of the local high school. They have a daughter, Karen Renee, a student at Dillard University. A street that bears the name Brannum is just east of Gould Boulevard is in recognition of this family. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Travis, Edmund R.

TRIESCHMANNS, William F.
BIOGRAPHIES: “Forebears of this family came originally from Castle, Germany, to Iowa. William F. Trieschmann came to L. P. to work with the East Arkansas Lumber Company. (The name was later changed to East Carroll Lumber Yard) W. F. married Ozell Belser and their 4 sons are William F. , Jr., (a West Point graduate), King Belser (LA Tech graduate, present owner-operator of the lumber yard), George Vance (professor of Architecture at Tulane University), and Major Robert Wayne Trieschmann of the U. S. Air Force.
King, who lives in L. P., married the former Flora Carolyn “Flo” Montgomery of Tallulah, daughter of Thomas Hugh & Ethlyn Bowers Montgomery. Flo is an L. S. U. graduate. They have 3 children: Laura Catherine, King Belser, Jr., “Triesch”, and Flora Caroline. Their church affiliation is Grace Episcopal. Mrs. Trieschmann is a Gir Scout leader.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trotter, Nathan
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Trieschmann, William F.

Tucker, Tilghman (see also McCulloch, Dr. William)
"Tilghman M. Tucker, after serving as governor of Mississippi and also as a U. S. Senator, made a trip on the Mississippi scouting for "high land" and bought Cottonwood Plantation. Mrs. Tucker died of cholera there, having been exposed to the plague while nursing the sick during the epidemic of 1850. Governor Tucker died here in 1859. His daughter, Katherine, and her husband Dr. William McCulloch came to manage Cottonwood. During the Civil War, Dr. McCulloch served in the Confederate Army.
After the war, the McCullochs returned to Cottonwood only to find it in blackened ruin. They restored the place and bought another farm in the area known as "The Bend." One of their eight children, Elizabeth, married W. B. Benjamin.
Another descendant of these families who still lives here is William McFarland "Mac" Long, a long-time former sheriff.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Turner, James Nelson
BIOGRAPHIES: “Mr. James Nelson Turner, in the newspaper business for over 60 years, was born and reared in L. P.. The son of Peter and Margaret Tinsley Turner and born here in 1859, he was educated locally and went directly into newspaper works, serving as an apprentice as a boy, then becoming an editor, a manager, and finally establishing The Banner Democrat, a weekly paper, in 1878. He knew the parish from its beginnings as a result. His newspaper grew to a circulation of 1,500in a town of then less than 4,000. He wrote much of the paper himself. He was married to the former Miss Louise Klenn of Missouri.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Turner, Peter
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Boarding House of Peter Turner, which shows a reflection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Tyler, Harrison
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: Harrison Tyler of Bunch’s Bend was president of the School Directors.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Valentine, Mark Jr.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

VanFossen, Samuel
BIOGRAPHIES: “The VanFossens of E. C. Parish are descendants of Dr. Richard Sewell Key and his wife Helen C. Beck, of Afton Plantation in Bunch‘s Bend, and of Samuel & Elizabeth Fowler Van Fossen, who were natives of New York State and Massachusetts. Mr. VanFossen was born at Hemlock, Livingston Co., New York, and came to Carroll Parish by way of Mobile, AL, and New Orleans. In 1862, he married Josephine Irish Stowers (daughter of Judge and Mrs. Irish of Port Gibson, MS.) They lived on Erin Plantation. After Josephine‘s death in 1877, Thomas L. VanFossen married Helen Key Beck of Afton Plantation. Their son Harry attended the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

EMAIL:
VanFossen, Harry T.
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 22:18:26 -0700

“Mrs. Harry VanFossen, was my grandfather's sister. My family is from Natchez area.
Have heard stories of a China Grove Plantation, but that's all. There is a picture that I will give almost anything for except my youngest son. But I do have four teenagers that are cheap. It was published in The Natchez Democrat in March 2, 1969, it was titled “A Distinguished Family“ by Norman Reproductions. The picture is on my Family Page.”
JOHN MCPHATE

VanFossen, Maude
“She became associated with The Delta News in 1964. She started her journalism in the 1920's with only a high school education and one point of instruction, "Spell people's names like they spell them", this was said by the late Nick Hamilton, whom she worked with. She was working for the Banner-Democrat after 37 years, then went to work at The Delta News with Mrs. Margaret Surles and Mr. Carlton and they gave her a parish as her field.” LETTER FROM EDITOR dated July 14, 1981.

Vaughters, Oeina (see Clement, T. I.)

Violett, A.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business merchants were A. Violett, F. M. Harp, and William Rous in Lake Providence. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Vick, Newitt
“While the west bank of the Mississippi River was being settled, there had developed a village on the east banks of the Mississippi River just south of Lake Providence that would soon influence surrounding areas, bringing great destruction to our neighbors to the east, reprisals and uneasiness to the inhabitants between the rivers. Not that the village on the east bank wanted this, but because of its strategic location the village fell victim to forces over which it had no control.
Newitt Vick came to the “Old South” sometime in the late 1700’s or the very early 1800’s, according to the historians. He was a Methodist minister, farmer, the father of 13 children, who had left Virginia society and came by flat boat to the hills of Mississippi, which later became known as Vicksburg. He was a wealthy man.
Others followed Vick from the east, planters with slaves and money, because the Great River was a good route for trade especially after the advent of the steamboat in 1812. Thus a village sprang up and was named Vicksburg in honor of the first settler. The town was incorporated in 1825 and 1835 had a population of 2500.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Vining, Lonni

Vining, Randal

Vining, W. L. & Lorena
BIOGRAPHIES: “Mrs. A. J. Hawsey was Floyce Vining, one of 7 children of the late W. L. & Lorena Vining. These brothers and sisters are:
Clifford Vining, who is a contractor in Yuma, AZ.; Glen Vining, a pilot of a B-26 with the USAF at Waco, Texas, and a veteran of 52 bombing missions in Africa during WWII;
Alice Yvonne Orr, who lives in Dallas; Lonnie Gene Martin, who lives in Sheridan, OR; Floyce Hawsey, of Ten Oaks, East Carroll Parish; Francis Marvin Vining, an attorney-at-law in Monticello, Mississippi; Bell Vining, of Thermopolis, Wyoming, whre he is business manager of an Arapahoe Ranch.” From “Between the Rivers”, Florence McKoin

Vinson, Mrs. Mary
“Mrs. Mary Vinson told me that she knew both the James and Younger Brothers. They had been to her house to see her husband who was a physician. He treated Frank James for a gunshot wound once and both brothers for malaria. She said they were well-mannered men and years later she found it difficult to believe all she read in magazines about them. She credited the James and Younger brothers with saving Floyd from the Yankees.” From “Between the Rivers”, Florence McKoin

Vinson, W. J. P.

Voelker, Isobel
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “assisted in organizing and developing a savings company” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Voelker, Mrs. Stephen (see also BIOGRAHIES: Pittman Brothers)

Voelker, Stephen
BIOGRAPHIES: “Stephen Voelker was born here, the son of Clemens A. Voelker, of German descent, and Kate Ashbridge. He grew up in Lake Providence and after high school attended Tulane University where he majored in business administration. He served in the Army during WWI and was the youngest man from Louisiana to be sent overseas. He organized the Tallulah Production Credit Association and managed the organization during its extension into ten parish. This association greatly aided farmers in increased production. Mr. Voelker moved from Tallulah to N. O., LA where he served as President of the Federal Intermediate Credit Bank until his retirement. He & Dorothy Pittman, daughter of J. W. Pittman, Sr., were married in 1924. Their children are Stephen, Jr., and Eva Stewart.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Wade, ?

Wagley, Patricia (see Craig, Norman)

EMAIL:
Wagner, William Sadd
“He was born Mar & 1879?. He married Minnie Lou Simmons (last name unknown). He died Feb 6th 1940. 6 children: Dorothy, William, Charlie (Charles), Woodrow, Jack, Henry Zet. Need verification of death dates of parents. Lived in Lake Providence, East Carroll Parish, LA.” majreid@qnet.com 1096

Wall, Mildred
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “originated an upholstering business; her care for her son a joy to behold” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Walker, Nicholas & Killy (see BIOGRAPHIES: Banks, Leandrew)

Wallace, Bob
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: After the fall of Vicksburg, there was a rumor that the “Yanks” planned to take Floyd next. This rumor persisted and fell on the ears of a very interested soldier. The Confederate army was in a state of disarray, weak from lack of food and defeat. Soldiers were leaving every day. The interested soldier was Bob Wallace, and he managed to leave and get across the big river. He was on his way to Floyd as fast as he could go by foot when he came across a mule grazing by the road. He took possession of the mule by his mane, hoping to ride him part of the way. He came to a cabin without anyone at home. Here he found rope and a mule collar and took both, making a halter for the mule out of the rope and sometimes sitting on the collar to ride. Finally he and the mule made it to Delhi. Here a man with a rested horse carried the news of the impending danger to Floyd.”
“Mr. Wallace reached Floyd after the danger was over and continued on to his home which was located where the Wallace Landing Road reaches Boeuf River today, taking the mule with him.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Wallace, John W.

Walton, Emmie (see Cammack, Dr. Abner Sam)

Warren, Omie (Pinkston) (see also Hawkins, Mary Warren)
BIOGRAPHIES: “On Sunday, Oct. 2, 1960, the local 1st Baptist Church honored Mrs. Omie (Pinkston) Warren, the only surviving charter member then, with a special “Omie Warren Day”. Funds contributed in here honor were used purchase an antique table that stands in the church foyer, inscribed with her name. She came to E. C. as a bride and lived, with husband, Morgan Warren, on a plantation near Hollybrook. Their six children were Morgan, Jr., of Vicksburg, Mary (Mrs. W. B. Hawkins) of Monticello, Wilma (Mrs. Oren Russel) of Baton Rouge, Helen (Mrs. Dave Tschabold) of Lake Providence, John of Frankfurt, Germany, and Madge (Mrs. Curtis Johnson) of Saratoga Springs, New York. Mrs. Warren, in addition to her early affiliation with the church and its auxiliaries, was also an early Worthy Matron of the Order of Easter Star, local Chapter #42.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Watson, James
RECONSTRUCTION: “The losses sustained by the plantations during the war years wee staggering. On February 2, 1866, James Watson, administrator of the Massingill Estate, testified in probate court, ‘When I accepted the succession n 1863, it consisted of land, slaves, and personal property amounting to $18,160.00. Since that time, the slaves, whose value was $11,150.00 have been emancipated and are therefore lost to the estate. Because there was a danger that the personal property would be stolen, I was forced to sell, and received payment in Confederate Treasury notes, which have since become valueless. At the time, there was a cotton crop growing, estimated at 65 bales, but this was confiscated. So, an estate that was good for all its indebtedness when I took over, has become, by the misfortunes of war, hopelessly insolvent.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Waxman, Sylvia
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “court worker, teacher” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Webb, Charles H.
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the South East of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1844 a mortgage was reported thus: ‘a cotton plantation situated on the east bank of L. P., Township 21, Range 12E, Lots 2-8 (902.73 acres), and buildings to be mortgaged for $48,000; improvements, 20 slaves, horses, cattle, 75 hogs, 50 bbl corn, household furniture and farming utensils -- all stand mortgaged to Jess H. Chaney & Charles H. Webb to secure the payment of 150 bales of cotton’.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Whicher, Franc
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

White, Hugh & Samuel
“Settlers began to come in after the U. S.’s purchase of the territory out of which Carroll Parish was later carved. Among the first settler are the names of James Floyd, Hugh and Samuel White, John Millikin, and Shipley Owens. These surnames appear early in the records of West Carroll Parish also. Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Wiley, Captain Jackson (nee Wyly)

Williams, William R.
“Boats began to run on Boeuf River in the 1800’s and continued until the railroads began to serve the area. A boat landing was established and a warehouse built at ‘Point Jefferson’ on Boeuf River six miles east from the present site of Oak Ridge. Point Jefferson and Ion Landing, which was located near where Girard is today on Boeuf River, were both large shipping points for the settlers on both sides of the river. The arrival of a steamboat at these landings meant great crowds would assemble to see the boat, get drunk and have a good time. At Ion Landing, William R. Williams had a store and a race track, so says Mr. C. C. Davenport, son of Isaiah Davenport, the original settler. Mr. Davenport wrote his memoirs in 1910 for the ‘Mer Rouge Democrat’ and now these articles have been put in booklet form, “Looking Backward”.
“Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Williamson, Norris Charlescraft
CITIZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: “Norris Charlescraft Williamson owned what is now Wilton Plantation. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. (see also Brock, Joseph Lawrence)

BIOGRAPHIES: “ Norris Williamson was born in Salem, Miss., on July 31, 1874, the son of Albert W. Williamson & Josephine Leggett. He received his B. S. from Miss. State University in 1897, and moved to E. C. on July 4, 1897. He began work as a contractor for the construction of levees along the Miss River, then diversified his interests in 1904 with the purchase of Owenton Plantation. In 1920, he bought the 4,000 acre Wilton Plantation, and gave up his contracting business to devote himself exclusively to the production of cotton, grains, and cattle. Mr. Williamson‘s interests also included politics. Elected to the Police Jury, he served as President from 1912-1916, resigning this position when he was elected to the LA State Senate from East Carroll, Mr. Williamson served in the Senate from 1916 to 1932 as Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, and sponsored legislation for cattle tick eradication. In 1925, he sponsored legislation for the adoption of the Constitutional Amendment providing women‘s suffrage in the United States.
In 1922, Mr. Williamson helped to organize the LA Farm Bureau Federation and served as director. In 1923, he helped to organize the LA Cotton Cooperative Association, as well as the American Cotton Cooperative Association. He also a co-founder and member of the executive committee of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives. In 1944, he was declared “Man of the Year“ in service to agriculture in Louisiana by Progressive Farmer magazine. On Feb. 5, 1918, Mr. Williamson married Sally Cooke, daughter of H. Brent Cooke & Rachel Wilson of Louisville, KY. In 1928, they adopted a 7 yr. old girl, naming her Norris after Mr. Williamson. On Jan. 1, 1943, “Little“ Norris married Joseph L. Brock. Two children were born to this marriage, Joseph Lawrence, Jr., and Sally Elizabeth.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Witkowski, Simon
Leon LeFevre says in some communities they were known as the Miller Missionaries (the James Gang), because of their help to needy families. One story told by his father: “One day Jesse stopped to see the family of a friend who had lost his life in the war. He found the mother of five children crying and when he asked her why, she showed him a note from a Simon Witkowski who held mortgage on her little farm. This note said she would have to pay the debt or he would be forced to foreclose on the mortgage. This rang a bell in Jesse’s head - he saw his mother in this situation , and gave the widow the amount of money owed Mr. Witkowski, a Polish Jew and a very rich man. He told her not to turn the money loose until she had a receipt in her hand for it. He left a very proud and grateful family. The following day Mr. Witkowski called on the widow and demanded payment. To his surprise she was ready to pay. He gave her a receipt for the money and soon on h is way back home. Halfway to Caladonia, his home, a bandit with a handkerchief over his face stepped from behind a tree, covered the rider with his gun, while he relieved him of his watch and all the money he had. If Mr. Witkowski recognized who this bandit was, he dared not mention it in the open.“ From "Between the Rivers", by McKoin

Wyly, Mattyle
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “hostess, club organizer, church leader” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Yell, W. Jones
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: W. Jones Yell, a native of Arkansas, was a member of the Sons & Daughters of Jacob, and a Sunday School teacher all of his life. He came to Louisiana in 1870 and was a prominent citizen. He taught school for a while, but for the greater part of his life was a farmer on All Right Plantation. He was a member of the State Legislature from 1880 to 1882. He was a quiet, peaceable man.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Wilson, ?
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

White, W. M. Corporal.
17th Texas Infantry, Company E. William was born in Tennessee in the 1839 but came to Texas when he was 12. He joined the 17th Texas Infantry, Company E, at Camp Terry, Texas, in early 1862. The 17th was in Walker's Texas Division (Walker's Greyhounds). The 17th was in the 3rd Brigade with the 3rd Texas Inf., the 16th Texas Inf., the 19th Texas Inf., and the 16th Texas Cavalry (dismounted). Much of 1862 was spent in Arkansas where my grandfather took ill at Little Rock. He recovered and served with his regiment at actions in Louisiana at Lake Providence, Milliken's Bend, Young's Point, Richmond, LaFourche Crossing, Brashear City, Cox's Plantation, Donaldsonville, Bayou LaFourche, Harrisonburg, Fort Beauregard, Morgan Ferry, Atchafalaya River, Sterling's

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