Thursday, October 29, 2009

Plantations of Northeast Louisiana

[STILL WORKING ON THIS ONE]
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Afton Plantation
"Afton was a two-story frame building where this family's descendents lived for a hundred years. A 15' veranda crossed the entire front. Family bedrooms and the governess' quarters were located on the 2nd floor. "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston
Dr. Richard Sewell and Helen Beck Key moved from Claiborne Parish, LA to Bunches Bend in 1832 to form Afton Plantation." "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston
Location: Ward 4, Township 22 North, Range 13 East, Sections 28-29, (East) Carroll Parish, LA.
Census: Appeared on the 1860 Slave Schedules (47 slaves, listed as Helen C. Key.),1860 Mortality Schedule (5 slaves listed with last name Key).

Airlie Plantation (see Arlie Plantation)

Alabama Plantation (4th Ward)
William Betron Ragland, Sr., long a familiar and popular citizen, was born Jan. 31, 1902, in Miss., the son of John & Lillian Wood Ragland.
“Mr. Bill“ along with his farming interest, served as Deputy Sheriff for 38 yrs. He purchased Helena Plantation in 1941 at Bunch‘s Bend. He later also purchased Alabama Plantation. Mrs. Ragland entered public life as a member of the School Board, representing her Ward for many years until her retirement in 1970. She has also been active in civic and community affairs.” "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston

Albion Plantation
Location is Northwest East Carroll Parish, LA. 3,047.86 acres (combined with Wilton Plantation). Associated names: Morgan, Deeson

All-Right Plantation
Location is in Ward 3, Township 21 North, Range 13 East, (East) Carroll Parish, LA, near Round Lake. It was owned by Dr. Horace G. Blackman.
Census: Appeared on 1860 Slave Schedules (85 slaves, indexed as HG Blackinan), 1860 Mortality Schedule (4 slaves listed with last name Blackman), 1870 US Census Location (Blackman Plantation). Other Information: See also Eyrie Plantation - Dr. Blackman was the executor for his father in law, William Lovett Balfour's estate.
(Somehow it is connected to the Eyrie Plantation, Carroll Parish, LA.

Alsatia Plantation (2nd Ward)

Amy Plantation (4th Ward)

Arlie Plantation
Approximate Location: Ward 2, Township 19 North, Range 13 East, Section 16, 46, (East) Carroll Parish, LA.
The Airlie Plantation was owned and operated by James Green Carson, who moved across the Mississippi River from Canebrake Plantation in Adams County, Mississippi, around 1846 with his wife Catherine Waller Carson and family. The Carsons fled to Texas during the Civil War, and James Green Carson died of diphtheria in Tyler, Texas.
Census: Appeared on the 1850 Slave Schedules (117 Slaves, listed as JG Carson) and 1860 Slave Schedules (170 slaves, listed as James G. Carson).
NOTE: In fact there were four Canebrake Plantations.

Arlington Plantation "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston
"Arlington Plantation was a mansion filled with portraits of handsome men and beautiful women, Chippendale furniture, massive old silver, of azalea-bordered walks shaded by ancient oaks, and sweet scented jasmine along the way down to the boat landing on the lake.
Hastin M. Childers, and his wife, Matilda McGraw Childers, bought 1400 acres and founded the Arlington Plantation in 1824 spending $15,000 to have it built.
Its history includes the story of the death of Narcissa Jane Childers, their daughter, who refused to give up the handsome young son of the plantations' overseer. She was locked in an attic room on the third floor, until she agreed never to see him again. Three times aday, a large silver tray of food was brought up to her. She could eat if she promised to give up her lover. Three times a day the tray was returned untouched to the kitchen. She vowed that she would remain true to her one and only love. Day after day, week after week passed and she ate nothing. At last death mercifully end the romantic struggle. She died at the age of sixteen and today her tombstone lies at the front steps of the Arlington Plantation, as a reminder of unrequited love."
Ward 3, Township 21N., Range 12 East, Section 4, (East) Carroll Parish, LA, 1,400 acres. Associated Surnames: Childers, McGraw, Sparrow, Houghton, Voelker, Millikin, Patten.
Arlington is in the National Register of Historic Places – Building #80004476
Census: Appeared on the 1860 Slave Schedules (2 slaves, listed under Sparrow and Edward Sparrow), 1860 Mortality Schedule (10 slaves listed with last name Sparrow), 1870 US Census Location.

Ashtabula Plantation (Ward 5)

Ashton Plantation (5th Ward)

Atherton Plantation
Located in Ward 2, Township 20 North, Range 13 East, (East) Carroll Parish, LA; Latitude: 32.6984664 Longitude: -91.1703869. Owned by William Bodien Keene; JW Keene owned in 1853.
Census: 1860 Mortality Schedule (2 slaves listed with last name Keene)

Avoca Plantation (4th Ward)
FROM 'MY BIOGRAPHIES': “William Betron Ragland, Sr., long a familiar and popular citizen, was born Jan. 31, 1902, in Miss., the son of John & Lillian Wood Ragland. He first came here as a “cowboy” to bring some cattle to Homestead Plantation. He worked for the Holland Delta Company as manager of such plantations as Barber, Tyrone, and Avoca.” "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston

Back Place Plantation
Location was in Ward 3, Township 21N., Range 12 East, Section 4, (East) Carroll Parish, LA, 1,400 acres. Associated Surnames:Childers, McGraw, Sparrow, Houghton, Voelker, Millikin, and Patten.
Hastin M. (died 1834) & Matilda (McGraw) Childers (died 1852) owned in 1824; Edward & Minerva (Parker) Sparrow owned in 1852; Dr. Nathaniel Houghton (Lived and operated an office at Arlington only); C.A., Sr. & Kate (Ashbridge) Voelker; James S. Millikin. As per Hastin M. Childers’ will, his slaves were emancipated and conveyed to Liberia with passage money and clothing for a year; his plantation and fortune were given to his wife Matilda who later married Thomas Robedeau Patten in 1837. Houghton practiced with Balfour, Stacy, Goodrich, Montgomery and Walsworth. Edward Sparrow was the lawyer who drew up the will of Matilda Childers-Patten and was set to purchase Arlington for nearly $50,000 in 1852 which included 80 slaves. That sale was canceled and then was finalized in 1859 for $75,000. Kate (Ashbridge) Voelker was related to Edward Sparrow.

Bagdad Plantation

'Bank Tract' Plantation
IN MY 'BIOGRAHIES': “Brothers John, Jim, J. Walter, and George Pittman all came early to E. C. Parish from Georgetown, Georgia. At one time they were in partnership owning and operating such plantations as Bolyn, Morganza, “Bank Tract“, and Wilton.” "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston

Barber Plantation (see Avoca Plantation)

Bass Plantation

Bellaggio Plantation
"James E. Old tells of his arrival in 1824, at 14 years ols at Bellaggio Plantation." "Chastine (Chasteen, spelled both ways in records) and Rebecca Gardner Old evidently purchased Bellaggio Plantation before parish records began in 1832. Land Patents were signed by 2 presidents of the U. S.: Chastine's 160.40 acres were signed by James K. Polk, and Rebecca's 159.58 acres by Chester A. Arthur.""A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston
Approximate Location: Ward 3, Township 21 North, Range 12 East, Sections 14-17, (East) Carroll Parish, LA. Associated Surnames: Prince, Keene, Hood, Old, Houghton, Manning, and Howe. Owned by Prince Brothers: Berry and Balus in 1824, W.B., Martin and John L. Keene in 1833, Harbird Hood (1778-1834) in 1833 , Chastine & Rebecca (Gardner) Old, James E. Old & Ann (Old) Houghton, Edward C. Manning (leased from Charles Howe) in 1874
Census: Appeared on the 1850 Slave Schedules (25 slaves, listed as James Old)
Other Information: Land left to James E. Old and Ann B. Old-Houghton after Rebecca Gardner Old died; in a will dated 07/13/1836. Other children are Mary Jane and John Willson (Wilson) Old who were minors at the time. Lake Providence Hotel occupied one-half an acre and was a part of the estate of Catherine Gardner Old.

Bell Meade Plantation
"...Julia Blackburn married Edward H. Davis of Melle Meade Plantation, they had 6 children." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
It's Location was in Ward 5, Township 22 North, Range 12 East, Sections 34-35 (Section 75) , East Carroll Parish, LA; Latitude: 32.8737389, Longitude: -91.2306663
Associated Surnames: Edward H. Davis.
Census: 1860 Mortality Schedule (5 slaves listed with last name Davis). Associated Free Persons: Edward H. & Julia (Blackburn) Davis.

The Bend Plantation
Location: Ward , Township North, Range Carroll Parish, LA
From my 'BIOGRAPHIES': Tilghman M. Tucker, after serving as governor of Mississippi and also as a U. S. Senator, made a trip on the Mississippi scouting for "high land" and bought Cottonwood Plantation. Mrs. Tucker died of cholera there, having been exposed to the plague while nursing the sick during the epidemic of 1850. Governor Tucker died here in 1859. His daughter, Katherine, and her husband Dr. William McCulloch came to manage Cottonwood. During the Civil War, Dr. McCulloch served in the Confederate Army.
After the war, the McCullochs returned to Cottonwood only to find it in blackened ruin. The restored the place and bought another farm in the area known as "The Bend." One of their eight children, Elizabeth, married W. B. Benjamin.
Another descendant of these families who still lives here is William McFarland "Mac" Long, a long-time former sheriff.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Black Bayou Plantation (5th Ward)
"John F. Webb of Washington, D. C., bought it from Napoleon E. Larche on April 30, 1846, and sold the 418 acres to Zachariah H. Dorsey. The land lay immediately in the rear of land owned by Michael Ross on the lake." "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston
Township 22 North, Range 12 East, Section 69, (East) Carroll Parish, LA
Associated Surnames: Larche, Webb, Dorsey, Hood
Historical note: Owned by Napoleon E. Larche; John Webb in 1846; Zachariah H. Dorsey; Govy Hood
Census: Appeared on the 1860 Slave Schedules (63 slaves, listed as Govy Hood, Ward 3), 1860 Mortality Schedule (3 slaves listed with last name Hood)

Blue Ridge Plantation (2nd Ward)

Bolyne Plantation
In My 'BIOGRAHIES': “Brothers John, Jim, J. Walter, and George Pittman all came early to E. C. Parish from Georgetown, Georgia. At one time they were in partnership owning and operating such plantations as Bolyn, Morganza, “Bank Tract“, and Wilton.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
(see also the "Bank Tract Plantation)

Bonnie Doone Plantation

Bowie Plantation
"During August 1843 John Jones Bowie made two land purchases in Carroll, which today bears the name of "Bowie Planation". The 1st purchase was 80 acres from Jesse H. Chaney. It included the waterhole at the lower end of Chaney's field on Swan Lake Bayour where Chaney resided. The 2nd purchase was from Mrs. Elizabeth M. Fretwell, wife of Cullen A. Fretwell, and included 639.22 acres. Bowie purchased land from Robert McKee in 1845; "on the Dry Prong of Joe's Bayou". He bought it having one old carriage, wagon wheels, a feather bed, lots of books, farming utensils, shot gun, saddle tree, for the sum and price of $50., for which he gave his note with Reason/Rezin Bowie his security." It is located in Ward 3, Township 21 North, Range 12 East, Sections 59-60, (East) Carroll Parish, LA; off of Highway 134, Longitude: 32.7604090, Latitude: -91.2678892. Associated surnames are Chaney, Fretwell, Jones, Watkins, and Oliphant. (Jesse H. Chaney, Cullen A. & Elizabeth M. Fretwell, John Jones (wives American Ann Watkins and Mary C. Oliphant))

Brokenburn Plantation (1st Ward)
Located Ward 1, Carroll Parish, Louisiana in 1860. Approximately 1,280 acres with 600acres in Carroll Parish (now East Carroll Parish) and 680 acres in Madison Parish about 30 miles northwest of Vicksburgs, Warren County, Mississippi.
Date Constructed circa 1860. Associated Surnames:Stone and Ragan
Historical notes:
William Patrick Stone was living at Mississippi Springs, Hinds County, Mississippi when daughter Sarah Katherine (Kate) Stone was born in 1841. He moved to Stonington Plantation, Delta, Madison Parish, Louisiana by 1855 where he died in December of that year leaving his wife and ten children. His widow, Amanda Ragan Stone, bought the property of Brokenburn in about 1860. According to Kate Stone’s diary, Brokenburn was a newly opened place when her mother bought it. There were some cabins, but no residence.
Census: 1860 Mortality Schedule (18 slaves listed with last name Stone)
Other Information: Brokenburn left in succession and sold to Florence P. Stone in 1877.
Associated Slave Workplaces: Stonington Plantation, Delta, Madison Parish, Louisiana
Associated Free Persons:Amanda Ragan Stone; owner, and William Ragan Stone; son,
Florence P. Jones Stone, the daughter-in-law. Sarah Katherine "Kate" Stone; daughter. Associated Enslaved Persons; Aunt Lucy, Annie, Francesca “Frank” Carrora, Emma, Harriet, Webster, Charles, Uncle Hoccles (Hercules), Flora, and Sarah
Research Leads and Plantation Records
Stone, Kate (Author), John Q. Anderson (Editor), Brokenburn: The Journal of Kate Stone, 1861 – 1868. 1860 U. S. federal Census – Slave Schedules
Amanda Stone – 77 Slaves Ward 1 Carroll, Louisiana

Buckmeadow Plantation (5th Ward)

Caledonia Plantation

Camp Hope Plantation (1st Ward)

Camp Tensas Plantation (1st Ward)

Caney Plantation (1st Ward)

Carrollton Plantation (5th Ward)

Carondolet Plantation
"In 1869, Mr. & Mrs. David Muir and her brother , Mr. Robert Nicholson, and sister, Miss Elizabeth Nicholson, acquired and developed the plantations of Fairview and Carondelet on the river. They used the tenant system (of farming on "fourths" or "Halves"), as was customary after the Civil War. Frequent Mississippi River overflows nearly ruined their farming interest and the caving banks from shifts in the river currents steadily eroded their land holdings." From "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston.
Approximate Location: Ward 1 or 2, (East) Carroll Parish, LA. Owned by Mr. & Mrs. James Railey or Riley.
Census: Appeared on the 1850 Slave Schedules (57 slaves, listed as James Riley) and on the 1860 Slave Schedules (154 slaves, listed as James Railey), 1860 Mortality Schedule (11 slaves listed with last name Raily), 1870 US Census Location. Associated Slave Workplaces: Raleigh Plantation

Concord Plantation (2nd Ward)
"It was occupied by Richard Graham Benjamin" "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston. Approximate Location: Ward 2, Township 20 North, Range 13 East, Sections 38-42, (East) Carroll Parish, LA. Census: 1870 US Census Location (Benjamin Plantation). Cemetery located nearby at Latitude: 32.7023552, Longitude: -91.1309415
Associated Slave Workplaces: Homestead Plantation - Carroll, Carroll Parish, LA

Corbin Plantation

Cottonwood Plantation
"Major Amacker continued to raise cotton on Way-a-Way Plantation near town and he also grew rice with Mr. Nicholson at Cottonwood Plantation." From "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston.
It was located in Ward 4, Township 22 North, Range 13 East, E. C., LA.
Associated Surnames:McCulluch
Census: 1870 US Census Location (McCulloch Plantation)
Other Information: Freedman’s Bureau school operated there, near the Elder Grove Plantation. Approx. Location: _ Ward , ?Township North, Range Carroll Parish, LA
Census: 1870 US Census Location
Other Information: From 'MY BIOGRAPHIES': Tilghman M. Tucker, after serving as governor of Mississippi and also as a U. S. Senator, made a trip on the Mississippi scouting for "high land" and bought Cottonwood Plantation. Mrs. Tucker died of cholera there, having been exposed to the plague while nursing the sick during the epidemic of 1850. Governor Tucker died here in 1859. His daughter, Katherine, and her husband Dr. William McCulloch came to manage Cottonwood. During the Civil War, Dr. McCulloch served in the Confederate Army. After the war, the McCullochs returned to Cottonwood only to find it in blackened ruin. The restored the place and bought another farm in the area known as "The Bend." One of their eight children, Elizabeth, married W. B. Benjamin.
Another descendant of these families who still lives here is William McFarland "Mac" Long, a long-time former sheriff.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Crow’s Roost Plantation

Cunningham Plantation (2nd Ward)

Daisy Plantation (2nd Ward)

Deerfield Plantation Surnames:Oliver, Epps,and Chambliss. Historical notes: Owned by William T. Oliver in 1855; John W. Epps & Samuel L. Chambliss had had a “farming partnership of 5 years there.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. Census: 1860 Mortality Schedule (14 slaves listed with last name Chambliss)

Deeson/Desonaa Plantation“Formerly Holly Grove Plantation. Tom F. Montgomery deed it to John Wesley Montgomery. It was later the residence of the late William M. Deeson.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Denson Plantation (1st Ward)

Divine Plantation (1st Ward)

Doefield Plantation

Donna Vista Plantation (4th Ward)

Dorris Plantation (2nd Ward)

Dry Prong Plantation

Edgewood Plantation (1st Ward) “In the succession of Perry H. Hanna, this plantation was described as “bounded on the North by the Mississippi River, on the east and south by Salem Plantation, and on the west by Illawara Plantation.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
(see also Salem Plantation, see also Illawara Plantation)

Elder Grove Plantation (4th Ward)
“George W. Stewart sold Elder Grove to Ferdinand M. Goodrich on July 8, 1873, for $16,000:”Bounded on NE by Key Place, Siby Tucker’s Cottonwood on SW.’ In 1868, it had been recorded as owned by Mrs. Susan M. Stewart of Natchez, MS.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Elmwood Plantation

Elton Plantation (4th Ward)

Erin Plantation was located in Bunch’s Bend. The family names of Irish and Stowers are much involved in its ownership.
George Irish and his wife, Ann, purchased 1,156.8 acres in Bunch’s Bend in 1830. They had a daughter, Josephine. In his will, dated Sept. 1836, George left ½ of his property to his wife and ½ to Josephine.
Josephine married Gabriel Stowers. (see Lewiston Plantation) He purchased lots 18, 19, & 20, from Charles Morgan. Gabriel bought 513 acres fro $17,955, or $35. Per acre. He purchased an adjoining section 17, from Alexis Sappington - 163 acres at $40 per acre. These purchases became Erin Planation. When Gabriel died, the widow, Josephine Irish Stowers had remarried to Thomas L. VanFossen, and died in childbirth. Erin Plantation was sold on March 21, 1885, at Sheriff’s sale to George Washington Sentell. Sentell died in 1896, and his widow, Mrs. Mildred A. Dickson Sentell, sold to her daughter, Mrs. Susan Rebecca Sentell Barber, wife of Leonard Kellogg Barber, Erin and Hope Plantations and one fifth interest in the Glen Mary Plantation for $13,125. The Barbers lived on Erin Plantation until 1903. Erin & Hope Plantations were sold to Mrs. Barber’s son-in-law, Francis T. Constant. During the Barber occupancy there was always open house. Bounteous meals, lively parties, hilarious entertainment were provided by the fun-loving Barbers. A story is told of a later Barber widow and her three children. Suddenly one day they left the midday dinner table and boarded a boat tied up in front of the house and never returned. For years a skeleton of this once beautiful home remained. Gone were childish laughter, love, happiness, hopes and dreams of the past. Erin has been sold many times since then.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Erin Plantation (4th Ward)

Eureka Plantation (1st Ward)

Evans Plantation (1st Ward)

Evoca Plantation (see Avoca Plantation)

Eyrie Plantation (4th Ward)
Owned by William Balfour. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Fairview Plantation (1st Ward)
"In 1869, Mr. & Mrs. David Muir and her brother , Mr. Robert Nicholson, and sister, Miss Elizabeth Nicholson, acquired and developed the plantations of Fairview and Carondelet on the river. They used the tenant system (of farming on "fourths" or "Halves"), as was customary after the Civil War. Frequent Mississippi River overflows nearly ruined their farming interest and the caving banks from shifts in the river currents steadily eroded their land holdings." From "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston

Forest Hill Plantation

Gailliard Plantation (Other spellings in records: Gailiard, Gillard, Gilliard, to Gillyard)
“In the suits of F. M. Goodrich and Edward Sparrow versus William Lucky Knox (the parish sheriff) and his wife, Emily Ann Knox, Gailliard Plantation was sold at a sheriff’s sale to Thomas B. Gailliard early in 1860. The Knoxes had earlier purchased Gailliard from Ferdinand Morgan Goodrich on Jan. 31, 1857. At the time they did “mortgage and hypothecate the same” to Edward Sparrow, and they defaulted on the agreement.
Gailliard owned the plantation for 8 years. The place again went under the sheriff’s hammer in 1868, and Mary Benton and Daniel Hubbard bought it. Hubbard later sold his undivided one half interest in the plantation to John and Charles Chaffe of N. O., La. , and they later sold it to Warren M. Benton. Gailliard later became the property of Field F. Montgomery and Edward James Delony.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Gassoway Plantation

Glenmary Plantation (4th Ward)

Goodrich Plantation (1st Ward)

Gossypia Plantation (5th Ward)
It was located in the northern part of the parish. ‘Gossypia’, the Indian word meaning “cotton”. Early owner was George W. Goza, in 1835. His widow met and married Dr. Nathan G. Goffe, physician of New Orleans, and the old house was replaced with a new one, about 1857. The home was built of brick in a mixture of Moorish and Spanish style, the house of 2 stories had a square tower rising from the hipped roof. The front entrance had an oval-shaped door-way with side panels of embossed glass. The ceilings were high and the rooms large. A circular stair led to the second floor, where wall drawings were ascribed to Yankee soldiers who were quartered there during the Civil War. The family had to flee for safety during the Civil War, and the next recorded owner a family from Kentucky named Newcomb. They were followed by Jacob Owen, also of Kentucky. In 1896, Mr. Denis Brown of south Louisiana bought this place. Early after the run of the century he lived there with his bride, the former Narcisse Williams. A grandson, Michael Brown, was making his home there when the house burned in 1960.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
NOTE: I personally met Michael Brown in the spring of 2009. He showed me around the home he and his wife live in now, the painting of Gossypia, the small cemetery behind his home, and the headstone of George W. Goza with a Goza infant laying nearby. He said that the old plantations top floor was a jailhouse for awhile, and the walls were 16 foot high.

Goza Plantation (5th Ward)

Green Plantation (1st Ward)

Guier Plantation

Hagaman Plantation fronted the Mississippi River and was located about ½ mile south of Lake Providence, is one of the old places in the parish. It was Lot 1 of the judicial partition of the original Conn Plantation. James P. Harvey acquired it in 1855 and it tourn sold it to Louise Dunbar, wife of Abraham Hagaman, in 1856. Louise Hagaman owned the land from 1856 - 1873 when she sold it to Julia M. Babbitt in exchange for certain hotel property in Grand Junction, Iowa.
The Babbitts were unable to meet the financial arrangement and “Hagaman Place’ was recovered by Louise Hagaman.
On February 14, 1883, Chaffe conveyed the plantation to Ann F. Delony, wife of Edward J. Delony. Mrs. Nannie Hunt Delony (Ann F.), second wife of Edward J. Delony and stepmother to his children, willed to Tobias Stephens Delony at her death in 1896, “To my son, Tobe, attentive and loving always, I give my Hagaman Place and horses….. It has remained in the Delony family ever since.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Helena Plantation (4th Ward)

Henderson Plantation (1st Ward)

Highland Plantation (5th Ward)
Highland was 1st owned by Dr. E. Benevell of Lexington, Virginia. It was created from a combination of Lone Wolf and Highland and was on Old River in Bunch’s Bend. The next owner was James G. Spencer. (In 1870, records show that H. M. Spencer owned it.) It had a mill house, a corn mill, and an engine boiler.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Holly Place Plantation (see Hollywood Plantation)

Hollybrook Plantation (2nd Ward)
"It was 1st owned by Philip Guier and his wife, Sarah Wilson, and inherited by their daughter, Susan E., wife of Ralph L. Graves of San Antonio, Texas. She also owned Poverty Point Plantation on Bayou Macon.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston (see also Poverty Point Plantation)

Hollywood Plantation
"Dr. Henry B. Blacburn was the 2nd husband of Elizabeth Beiller Boswroth, widow of Judge Felix Bosworth. They live at Holly Place, now known as Hollywood Plantation on the Tensas Bayou." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
"Robert Dunbar and his wife, Elizabeth, owned it at one time. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Homestead Plantation was owned by W. B. Benjamin in 1841.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Home Place Plantation was owned by Govy Hood and later Edward H. Davis.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Hopa Plantation (4th Ward)

Hopewell Plantation (4th Ward)
Owned by J. W. Montgomery. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Illawara Plantation (1st Ward)

Irish Place Plantation (see Lewiston Plantation)

Island Plantation (4th Ward)
This plantation was located near the town of Providence and mentioned in the succession of Robert J. Chambliss when 1,863 acres sold at $10 an acre. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Jackson Plantation (1st Ward)

Jefferson Plantation

Kerr Plantation (5th Ward)

Lakeland Plantation

Lakeside Plantation (4th Ward)

Lewiston Plantation (4th Ward)
"This plantation, located at Bunch's Bend, was a part of the estate of Lewis Stowers in 1835. Stowers had purchased 978.4 acres in 1842 from George Ierish, who called it the Irish Place. An additional purchase from Margaret Barker and Henry Carpenter brought the acreage to 1,866 acres. Stowers died in Kentucky in 1848, and his will left 622 acres to his three youngest sons, Franklin, William, and Lewis Edward Stowers." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Lick Skillet Plantation
"This plantation of 523 acres, located in Township 20N.R.12E was once owned by Mrs. Julia Mathews, widow of Thomas C. Mathews. It was then jointly owned by William Sibly and William D. King and located near Swan Lake."
From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
Live Oak Plantation

Locust Grove Plantation

Longview Plantation (4th Ward)

Longwood Plantation
"Longwood was some four miles above town and it was first owned by George M. Long. The next owner, Samuel Bond, sold "1,534 acresa and 107 slaves, corn fodder, 40 mules, cattle valued at $48,000." to Jospeh R. Parks. It was bounded on the front by the MS. River, upperside by Vista Plantation, on lower side by Hopewell Plantation, and in the rear by Eyrie and Robertdale Plantations.

Lonsdale Plantation

McNeal Plantation (1st Ward)

Manning Plantation

Maryland Planatation (4th Ward)

Melbourne Plantation (2nd Ward)

Monticello Plantation

Morganza Plantation (2nd Ward)

Mounds Plantation
"The will of that first William Billingsly Keene was dated Sept. 27, 1856, and in it he gave away plantions with a few strokes of the pen and dollars by the thousands. Earlier he had given his sons the plantations on which they were resideing. "I have given my LA land and slaves to them at sundry times," he wrote.
He gave to his granddaughter Mary E. Keene - Mrs. Edward Constant -- 20 shares of bank stock and Mounds Planation, along with her brother.
"All the old Negroes or any others not mentioned in this Will are to remain on the Mounds Plantation (occupied by me) and are to be supported comfortably during their life times." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston


Naponsette/Neponsette Plantation (2nd Ward)

No Mistake Plantation
"This plantation was owned by the Mitchiner family for many years. The place was given its name, according to W. S. B. Mitchiner, because "The cotton crop was abundant and unusually tall. I actually saw cotton eight feet tall. It will make a bale to the acres, and that's no mistake!. The first successful mechanical cotton, invented by John and Mack Rust, was tried out on this plantation." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Nyanza Plantation

Oakland Plantation
This plantation has lots of history. It was located right on the lake.
"Oakland Plantation was first owned by Wiley Taylor. In 1832, Matthew B. Sellers purchase "1,856 acres, cattle, farming utensils, 26 slaves, the crop and all appurtenances" from Wiley Taylor for $20,000.
The years of 1830 to 1860 are often spoken of as the golden age. The parish was ideal cotton area and five-sevenths of the tilled land was devoted to that crop.
A party held at Oakland in those days illustrates gracious living of the ante-bellum period. Guests from plantations and town were invited to attend a masque or character portrayal party. Mrs. Dr. Burwell was mistress of the parlor and dance room; Mrs. Frank Coleman was hostess of the supper room, Mrs. Sellers, Hostess of the home, graciously invited her guest to "freely partake of the bountiful supper..."
Some guest came dressed as Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Aaron Burr. "Never have we had the pleasure of being present at a more elegant, sociable and pleasant costume ball," one guest was heard to remark.
Many social activities occurred at the elegant residence on Oakland Plantation in pre-Civil War days. The house was described as a mansion. Surrounding the home grounds was an iron fense across the front, on near the public lake road, and high picket fences on the sides and rear.
The plantation was fronted on the north side by the lake, on the upper or western side by Bellaggio, below, or on the eastern side by Hood's home place and on the back, or south, by Jefferson Ridge owned by John S. Chambliss.
Matthew Sellers served the parish as president of the Police Jury from 1854 to 1858. Mrs. Sellers, the former Elizabeth M. Cash of Philadelphia, took great pride in the homesite which overlooked the calm and placid lake. There were trees of cypress, oak, pecan and magnolia on the grounds.
When Mrs. Sellers, the daughter of Thomas Cash, died in January 1867, and buried in Woodland Cemetery in her home town. It was after then that Matthew B. Sellers sold his beloved Oakland." [It is believe he moved to Philadephia right after her death].
The decades following rthe Civil War were hard years. Oakland - the land, the elegant residence and the furniture--everything except the silverware and family pictures, were sold to Judson M. Bemis for the sum of $55,000. The down payment was $30,000, "cash in hand" with two notes endorsed by J. O. and J. W. Pierce of St. Louis, Missouri. A suit in 1870 listed John O. Pierce and wife, Cornelia, as sole owners of Oakland. A series of sales followed. The Pierces sold to George C. and W. W. Benhamj, who came into the parish from the North after the war.
The Benhams sold Oakland to J. Edward Leonard of Weschester, Pennsylvania, a parish resident and law partner of Judge Joseph Mordici Kennedy. Leonard served the parish as District Attorney and as Republican Congressman." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Oasis Plantation
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.”
From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
"Owned by Mark Valentine in 1866; 2,000 acres." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Olivedell Plantation

O'Possum Point Plantation (4th Ward)

Out Post Plantation (1st Ward)

Owenton Plantation (5th Ward)

Panola Plantation (5th Ward)
"In the succession of R. W. Williams, dated 1870, Panola Plantation was described as being on Old River in Bunch's Bend. 3,535,69 acres of wild or uncultivated land, bounded on the north by land belonging to Shapely Owens and Julius Witkowski, on the east by Old River, on the south by Highland Plantation, and on the west by Bayou Macon." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Pecan Grove Plantation (1st Ward)
"In 1874, William Waller, jr. and his wife, Ann Adelia Johnson, owned this plantation. The plantation consisted of one undivided half of Lots 37-40 (4 in all) of Lot 36, T 19, R 13E, and 26 slaves. He bought this property from William M. Deeson. A half interest was sold to Joseph H. D. Bomar." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Perry Plantation (1st Ward)

Point Look-Out Plantation (2nd Ward)
"The owner of Point Look-Out Plantation was Job Bass and his wife, Maria Richardson Bass.
The ever-encroahing MS River forced the moving of the "dwelling house and buildings attac hed: carriage house, kitchen, smoke house, quarters, stable and gin back 400 feet from the levee and fitting them in their present condition. Brick pillars once the base of the house can be found among the vine-covered slopes on Point Look-Out." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
"Woodstock was formed from Lots 7 - 16 of the original Point Look-Out Plantation."
From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
"Dr. Horace B. Tebbetts paid to have a telegraph line run from L. P., via Point Look-Out, of which he owned at that time) to DeSoto, opposite Vicksburg so that he could have the latest cotton market reports."

Poverty Point Plantation

Raleigh Plantation (1st Ward)

Reclusia Plantation

Renshaw Plantation (1st Ward)

Rescue Plantation (1st Ward)

Roberta Plantation

Robertdale Plantation (4th Ward)

Salem Plantation (1st Ward)

Sauve Terre Plantation (2nd Ward)
"Owner of Sauve Terre was William Billingsly Keene of Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky, and Carroll Parish, who was the first W. B. Keene (3 generations of these initials) and his wife, Hannah Bodien Wallis of Baltimore. "In a land sale of June 6, 1832, to Mrs. Mary Keene Elliott by her father, it was recorded: "To my daughter to whom I have bargained and sold 170 acres of land in Township 20.
The will of that first William Billingsly Keene was dated Sept. 27, 1856, and in it he gave away plantions with a few strokes of the pen and dollars by the thousands. Earlier he had given his sons the plantations on which they were resideing. "I have given my LA land and slaves to them at sundry times," he wrote.
He gave to his granddaughter Mary E. Keene - Mrs. Edward Constant -- 20 shares of bank stock and Mounds Planation, along with her brother. He gave his grandson Alexander Keene Richards the Transylvania Plantation.
The total vaue of the LA estate was $682,000.
Mrs. Hannah Keene, after the death of William B. Keene in 1854, assumed wupervisor duties of the plantation for 4 years assisted by a manager. She married Dr. Horance "Horace" B. Tebbetts on Dec. 28, 1858. Hiram B. Tebbetts, his brother, married Laura Watson, widow of Clayton Boone, had several land holdings, bought from the Grahams and the Benjamins, naming it Concord, for his home in New England.
Captasin Keene died on Aug. 14, 1891. Mrs. Keene carried on the business to the best of her ability, but on Aug. 1, 1894, Charles Newman of the firm, H. & C. Newman, commission merchants of N. O., La., bought at auction the home, its furnishings, land, cattle, and the store merchandise, paying $189,102.28, or two-thirds it's appraised value. On Jan. 4, 1895, Mrs. Keene filed the last papers of her succession of the estate and later moved into the town." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Shelburne Plantation (5th Ward)
"Noah B. Hinton of Madison Co., MS., purchased 1,020 acres at the head of Lake Providence in 1845, which eventually would become the home of one of the most prominent families in the parish.
Hinton bought the land from 3 early real estate dealers; Oliver Jones Morgan, former Judge of Ouachita Parish, his brother Jonathan Morgan, and Govy Hood.
In 1850, Shelburn Plantation was sold by the parish sheriff to Dr. David Flournoy Blackburn for $23,460. 1/2 paid in cash; the remainder in two notes.
Dr. David Flournoy Blackburn & wife, Catherine A. Shelby came down the MS. River on a flatboat from Kentucky. They named their plantation Shelburn which was a combination of the family names Shelby and Blackburn. The boundaries of Shelbourn Plantation began at the head of the lake with Carrollton Plantation on the east, Hood's Black Bayou on the west, and in the rear was Highland Plantation.
When David Blackburn died on Dec. 1, 1860 his will listed property valued at $167,983" From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Sherwood Plantation (5th Ward)
NOTE: Owner was the father of Rebecca B. Williams. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Stamboul Plantation (2nd Ward)
"In 1902, the Muir/Nicholson family bought the Stone's place five miles west and built a home there. (More exactly, this location was three miles south of Stamboul where Mr. Leo Shields lived and one-half mile west of O'Hare's Switch--now Roosevelt.) The Amos Kent Amakers and Mrs. Muir lived here until 1906, when they and Colonel Nicholson moved to Lake Providence." From "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston.

"Stamboul is the present home of Mrs. Harry Shields (in 1976). In 1832, Dr. Alexander C. Keene purchased some 177 acres from Joab Thompson. This place has always been a cotton plantation and others like it suffered during the Civil War and Reconstruction.
Evenutally conditions improved. Mrs. S. H. Mobberly at one time operated Stamboul, cultivating 1,300 acres. 1,000 acres was in cotton and 300 acres in grains. At that time "wage squads" and tenants did the work." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Swan Lake Plantation (2nd Ward)

Templeton Plantation (1st Ward)

Tinnen Plantation (2nd Ward)

Transylvania Plantation
"W. B. Keene purchased Transylvania Plantation from his son-in-law, Dr. William Lewis Richards (who had married Eleanora). Harry Hardeman Graham, a Keene son-in-law, gave the right-of-way for a railroad line through Transylvania in 1902." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
"The will of that first William Billingsly Keene was dated Sept. 27, 1856, and in it he gave away plantions with a few strokes of the pen and dollars by the thousands. Earlier he had given his sons the plantations on which they were residing. "I have given my LA land and slaves to them at sundry times," he wrote. He gave his grandson Alexander Keene Richards the Transylvania Plantation." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Tyrone Plantation (4th Ward)
"Tyrone Plantation was located 4 miles west of town. This plantation once belonged to Chief Ahe-Min-Tubbe, a Choctaw Indian Chief. who was granted the land by the Secretary of War as a "Satisfaction of Claims arising under the 14th and 19th articles of the Treaty of Dancin Rabbit Creek" concluded in 1830.
Mauncsel White & Company of N.O., La. were the next owners of Tyrone Plantation. Horace Prentice wast the 1st local resident to own the place. He bought Tyrone from John Cathey and wife, Rebecca Liles in 1836.
Prentice sold this property to 12 early settlers for $20 an acre. Maunsel White & Co. became owners of Lots 78, 79, & 80, and half of Lot 24, and part of Lot 23 at a sheriff's sale in a suit of White versus Prentice. Maunsel White sold Tyrone's cotton plantation of 1,000 acres to John Logan Willson on February 5, 1846, Willson also bought a tract of 300 acres from Z. H. Dorsey and Thomas Jefferson Collins which fronted on River Bayou and adjoined the plantation of William L. Balfour on one side and Govy Hood on the other. It included "dwelling house, mill, gin house, farming utensis, 80 1st rate work mules, 12 good work horses, 2 good ox waggons, 8 yoke oxen, 100 head of cattle, and 25 slaves." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Valentine Plantation

Villa Vista Plantation (1st Ward)

Vista Plantation (4th Ward)
Vista was located six miles above town and W. M. Sutton was an early owner." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Waddill Plantation (2nd Ward)
M. Anderson bought this plantation from Luther M. Langford, who had bought it from Oliver J. Morgan in 1851, for $16,000. Land grants to soldiers of 160 acres of this place were made by an Act to "raise an additional military force", at a sheriff's sale in 1854. In 1870, Waddill was owned by James H. Wingfield." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Waterloo Plantation

Waverly Plantation (2nd Ward)

Way-A-Way Plantation
"In 1869, Mr. & Mrs. David Muir and her brother , Mr. Robert Nicholson, and sister, Miss Elizabeth Nicholson, acquired and developed the plantations of Fairview and Carondelet on the river. In 1902, the family bought the Stone's place five miles west and built a home there. (More exactly, this location was three miles south of Stamboul where Mr. Leo Shields lived and one-half mile west of O'Hare's Switch--now Roosevelt.) The Amos Kent Amakers and Mrs. Muir lived at the until 1906, when they and Colonel Nicholson moved to Lake Providence. Major Amacker continued to raise cotton on Way-a-Way Plantation near town and he also grew rice with Mr. Nicholson at Cottonwood Plantation." From "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston.

Westland Plantation (2nd Ward)

Willow Point Plantation (1st Ward)

Wilson Point Plantation (4th Ward)

Wilton Plantation (2nd Ward)
"Wilton was the home of the former Judge Olilver J. Morgan of Ouachita Parish. He later moved to Carroll Parish. His property is the parish's first land conveyance record, register April 30, 1832, and shows 999 acres in Township 19, on the Mississippi River, adjoining the property of John L. Buck.
Judge Moran's land holdings, together with those of his brother, Jonathan Morgan, and his partner, Harbird Hood, totaled 284,800 acres. In 1860, when he died Judge Morgan's estate was conservatively estimated at $1,182,314., including land, slaves, and personal property." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Winterfield Plantation

Wishwell Plantation
"Robert L. Campbell inherited Wishwell from his wife, Nannie A. Browder." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Woodstock Plantation
"Woodstock was formed from Lots 7 - 16 of the original Point Look-Out Plantation. Warren's first wife, Lucy Hunt Benton and Warren had a daughter named Sarah "Sally" Elilzabeth Benton. After Lucy died in Georgia he took a second wife in Carroll Parish, Martha Bass (daughter of Job Bass and Maria Richardson Bass of Look-Out Plantation), Martha and Warren had a daughter which they named Alice. Martha A. Bass Benton died in Dec of 1843. 2 prominent women of E. C., La., Marie Louise Benton Garner and her younger sister, Sarah N. Benton Powell, enjoyed the leisure and prosperity of Woodstock from the time of birth until their marriage. They were daughters of Warren M. Benton and his 3rd wife, Miss Royal. Sally was born at Woodstock, her sister was 4 years old.
Warren married a 4th time to Mary Hughes, prior to June 1860. He died on Feb. 1, 1873. His son-in-law, Frank S. Garner, husband of Mary L. Benton, was the 1st administrator of the Woodstock Estate." From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Wyly Plantation (1st Ward)

Wyly-Bass Plantation (2nd Ward)

Wynn Forest Plantation (1st Ward)

NOTE:East Carroll Parish Tax Assessors Roll 2006-2007 for legal land descriptions.

7 comments:

  1. Do you know the distance and location of Goodrich's Landing, Carroll Parish, La. from Vicksburg? I have trouble locating it. Thank you Marty

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  2. Hello there!
    I have relatives that are listed in the 1870 census living on the Naponsette/Neponsette Plantation. Do you know where I can find some more history of this plantation?
    Thanks!
    Heidi

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  3. I see a Blackmon or Blackman Plantation in Carroll Parish 1870 Census page 59. This plantation is listed before Arlington Plantation in the 1870 Census.

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  4. My great great great grandmother was Fannie(Fanny) Goza, married Reece Johnson of Warren County, GA. There son William Goza Johnson was born in Louisiana. Does the Goza Plantation in the 5th ward have a family cemetary.
    terryjohnson1942@yahoo.com

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  5. Does anyone know of a plantation home, in any condition, that could be purchased in the area?
    I am interested in restoring a piece of history. Any La/MS location, any condition. Let me know if have a lead. roger@gogulf.net. Thanks, Roger Hooper

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  6. I am looking a Plantation that had slaves with the last name of Strother or Dunn?

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  7. The picture next to the history of the Sherwood and Stamboul Plantations which Plantation home does it depict? Sherwood or Stamboul? Thank you. Great Page!

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