Tuesday, August 24, 2010

S, T, U, & V Surnames

Saint, Miss - Vought, Dorothy (Miss)

Saint, Miss
EDUCATION; CARROLL CONSERVATIVE NEWSPAPER; November 23, 1875: “The White Public School is being taught at the Fireman’s Hall in the town of Providence, Henry Goodrich, Jr. is Principal, and Miss Saint, is Assistant”. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.“

Salemi, Annette
BIOS: BIO: John/Gaetano Salemi and Grace/Grazia DeVincent Salemi were the parents of a daughter named Annette, whom became Mrs. Sam Domino, Jr.. She died in 1968. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Frankie [see Salemi, Gaetano]
BIOS: BIO: John & Grace (or Gaetano Salemi and Grazia DeVincent) were the parents of Frankie, who was killed in an auto accident in 1936. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Gracie
BIOS: Gracie is the daughter of Gaetano “John” and Grazia “Grace” Salemi. Gracie is still living at the family home in L. P. Gracie has worked at the Terral Clinic for the past 24 years. [1976] “A Place to Remember”.

Salemi, Gaetano & Grace
BIO: “John or Gaetano Salemi and Grace (Grazia) DeVincent were married in Cefalu, Italy in 1899. They came to New Orleans on their honeymoon and in the same year decided to make Lake Providence their home. Mr. Salemi, who maintained his Italian citizenship, had a grocery store on the corner of Lake & Scarborough Streets. Of their 12 children, two died in infancy(1 & 2), (3)Frankie Salemi, (4) Annette Salemi, (5) Theresa Salemi, (6) Lucie Salemi, (7) Lena Salemi, (8) Kelly Salemi, (9) Vincent Salemi, (10) Johnnie Salemi, (11) Gracie Salemi and (12) Salvador Salemi. 3 of these still live in the family home on Sparrow Street. The Salemi‘s never lost contact with their homeland and returned to Italy with their children for annual visits. The parents, as well as the older children, continued to speak Italian in the home. On April 24, 1960, this couple was honored by the Bill Leyden TV show, “It Could Be You“, on the occasion of their 61st wedding anniversary At that time there were 9 children, 16 grandchildren & 15 great-grandchildren.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Johnnie
BIOS: ‘Grace’ Grazia DeVincent Salemi and ‘John’ Gaetano Salemi and were the parents of Johnnie Salemi. He was married to Mae Carmouche and lives in Norco, LA. He served in WWII, and was wounded in the European theater. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Kelly
BIOS: John “Gaetano” Salemi and Grace “Grazia” DeVincent Salemi were the parents of Kelly Salemi. Kelly lived in Lake Providence. He married the former Edna Waters. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; PERFORMING ARTS: The Providence Players is a group of theatrically inclined citizens met in February, 1974, to gratify the needs for the performing arts. The Providence Players in 1976 had 40 members and 50 patron or season ticket subscribers. Charter members making up the Board were Peggy Madden, Dr. Bernard Waxman, William Gore, Kelly Salemi, Margaret Barham, Alice Amacker, Pat Taylor and Gracie Salemi. This group has presented four plays at the L. P. H. S. in the past two years.” [1977] From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Lena
BIOS: Gaetano Salemi and Grazia DeVincent Salemi, also known as John and Grace, were the parents of Lena. Lena married Joe R. Forte, Jr., of Lake Village, Arkansas. Lena married Jasper Titone, of Vicksburg, MS. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston. [*NOTE: I think she was a teacher at L.P.H.S. in the 60’s]

Salemi, Lucie
BIOS: Gaetano “John” Salemi and Grazia “Grace” DeVincent Salemi were the parents of Lucie. She married Jasper Titone, of Vicksburg, MS. Lucie was still living at the family home on Sparrow Street. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston. [*NOTE: I think she was a teacher at L.P.H.S. in the 60’s]

Salemi, Salvador
BIOS: Salvador is the son of ‘John’ Gaetano Salemi and ‘Grace’ Grazia DeVincent Salemi. He was in WWII, in the army, in the European theater. Salvador is part owner in a drug store. Salvador, with siblings Gracie and Lucie still live at the family home on Sparrow Street. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Theresa
BIOS: Gaetano Salemi and Grazia DeVincent Salemi were the parents of Theresa. She married Charles Cesare of Vicksburg, MS. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Salemi, Vincent
BIOS: ‘John’ Gaetano Salemi and ‘Grace’ Grazia DeVincent Salemi were the parents of Vincent Salemi. He served in Europe and the Canal Zone in WWII, in the army. Vincent lived in Los Angeles, California. His wife was the former Marie Morrison. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Salmon, Mrs.
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members of whom Mrs. Salmon was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Sammons, Gus (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. Through the generosity of Mrs. Gus Sammons who willed an acre of land to the church, the Sammons Memorial Cemetery was made possible. Her will further gave New Hope Church the income from a 44 acre tract of land, as well as her own home to be used as a parsonage.. Present (1976) pastor is Reverend Clyde Coulter. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Sanders, Mr.
Between 1840 and 1860 a Mr. Sanders owned a sawmill west of Oak Grove. "Between the Rivers", McKoin

Sanders, Elbert E.
BLACK CHURCHES; FIRST PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF SONDHEIMER was organized in 1941 by Elbert E. Sanders. The Hendrix family helped build the first church located on Bear Lake. In 1954 the church was moved nearer Sondheimer. The first person to conduct services at the church was an evangelist, Alma Levi. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Sanderson, George
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
PLANTATIONS; ARLINGTON: Daughter of Edward and Minerva (Parker) Sparrow. She was first married to George F. Sanderson, at Arlington. They produced no living heirs. She later married George W. Foster. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sandidge, Penn
EDUCATION: Mr. Penn Sandidge, Principal of the Northside Elementary School died Feb. 8, 1974. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Sanford, B. A.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Santos, Miguel de
EARLIEST SETTLERS:
“Book B, page 397 indicated that Miguel de Santo was given a tract of land in 1788 consisting of 40 arpents front by 40 arpents deep, situated on the Bayou Macon in the post of Ouachita.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Sappington, Alexis
LOCAL BOARD OF EDUCATION: 1846: Joseph Macquillan, Chairman, Alexis Sappington, and George R. Newman, members. This was the 1st School Board. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
Alexis Sappington is mentioned as being School Superintendent in 1851. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Josephine and Gabriel Stowers bought 163 acres, adjoining section 17, for $17,955 (or $35 per acre) from Alexis Sappington. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sartain, Cain (colored)
INTERNET E. C., LA 1880 Census:
*Cain Sartain was born in 1844 in Mississippi. His father was born in Africa and his mother was a mulatto, born in South Carolina. He married Mahala Young on Nov. 26, 1868. 1880 Census shows Chaz Sartain as adopted. Chaz was 11 years old on census. (born about 1869) They lived on Airlie Plantation, in the Goodrich Landing area.*
A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. All office were filled with colored people, Cain Sartain was senator, followed by Jackworth Clay. Jim Gardener was representative for awhile.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: August D. Wright was the editor and Cain Sartain, a Negro man, was one of the proprietors. A 1873 issue: “Hon. George C. Benham and Hon. Cain Sartain, Parish Representatives; Hon. Wade H. Hough, District Judge; Hon. Hiram H. Steel, District Attorney; Hon. W. N. Benham, Assistant Sheriff; David Jackson and W. M. Abbot, Clerks of District Court; M. A. Sweet, Reorder; John Asberry, Coroner; and R. K. Henderson, State tax Collector.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
RECONSTRUCTION; POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: Representatives from Carroll included George Benham and the freedman, Cain Sairtain. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Cain Sartain of Goodrich Landing was the first representative, and then Senator about 1875. Jim Gardner was also representative but he probably was from West Carroll. Jacques A. Gla, President of the Board of School Directors, lived on the lake front, J. R. Grimes was a pastor and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Nicholas Burton served as Sheriff and the Secretary Treasurer of the School Board.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
EAST CARROLL MARRIAGES: Sartains
26 Nov. 1868 Sartain, Cain - Young, Mahala
13 Oct. 1898 Sartain, Mary - Rodgers, Richard

Savage, Elizabeth (Mrs.)
“Miss Kate Stone (writer of “Brokenburn” her diary) mentions Mrs. Elizabeth Savage going to Floyd frequently in 1862. I assumed the Savage Plantation was nearer the Macon River than most of the others. She said, ‘Mrs. Hardison was telling us of Mrs. Abe Curry’s trip on horseback to Floyd. She must be crazy.’ A footnote said this was fifty miles round trip and mentioned Floyd being the county seat of Carroll Parish. There were federal troops in this area trying to stir up trouble among the slaves which was the reason Miss Stone thought Mrs. Curry’s trip hazardous.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Saunders, E. D.
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1893: E. D. Saunders. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Scarborough, David B.
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Scarborough, Thomas C.
STREETS AND ADDITIONS: “Scarborough Street was named for Thomas C. Scarborough, a Judge who lived here from 1856 - 1860. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1852, and a member of the State Legislature. Mr. Scarborough was a civil engineer by profession. He served at age 50, as a Captain in the 25th Louisiana Regiment during the Civil War.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: Gov. Moore offered a $50 bounty for recruits to serve in the army demands. T. C. Scarborough of Providence raised another company of volunteers. These volunteers were inducted into the Confederacy as Co. K, 25th Louisiana, Louisiana. They left almost immediately for Kentucky. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives avis was a daughter of Edward Hugh and Julia Blackburn Davis. She was born on Tyrone Plantation, lived on Island Plantation and after her mother‘s death was reared by her sister Catherine (Katie) Davis. She went to Jessamine Female Institute in Nicholson, KY, then returned to keep house for her father on Belle Meade Plantion. In 1899, while the Davises were living on Star Arlington Plantation, she and Frederick Hall Schneider (Sr.) were married. They took a honeymoon trip on the steamboat Bell of the Bends. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Schneider, Edward Davis (Sr.)
BIOS: Edward Davis Schneider is the son of Frederick Hall & Nan (Davis) Schneider. He was a graduate of L. S. U., a member of Pi Kappa Alpha and of the football team and the “L” Club. He and Jessica Atherton Graham were married in 1922. (see also Graham, Harry) Their 2 sons were Edward Davis Schneider, Jr., and Harry Graham Schneider. Mr. E. D. Schneider served on the Episcopal Church Vestry and as Treasurer & Superintendent of the Grace Church school. He was a member of Knights of Pythias, the Rotary Club (it’s 4th president), local president of L. S. U. Alumni. He served on the Board of Directors of the 1st National Bank, the North LA Building & Loan Association, the West Carroll Bank, the O’Neill McNamara Hardware Board, and was President of the local School Board. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 . Edward Davis Schneider was on the bank‘s Board of Directors and was also President of he School Board when he died in 1952. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members and President for the 1939 - 1940 term was Edward D. Schneider. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Schneider, Edward Davis, Jr. “Ned”, older son of the Edward Davis Schneiders, attended LA Tech, was a member of Pi Kappa Phi, and farmed and managed Star Arlington & Winterfield Plantations. Later he worked for the East Carroll Conservation Service, and became a professional photographer. He married Betty Lorraine Johnson, daughter of James Louis and Elouise Thompson Johnson, and their children were Edward Davis III, and Mary Elouise Schneider. He served on the Episcopal Vestry and was President of the L. P. Junior Chamber of Commerce. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Schneider, Edward Davis (Mrs.)
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. Edward D. Schneider, she was also one of the Regents of Moses Shelby Chapter since Mrs. McDaniel. She also served as State Regent for Louisiana in 1957 - 1959, and then as a National Vice-President.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Schneider, Frederick Hall (Sr.)
Frederick Hall Schneider (Sr.)’s father is William Henry Schneider, Jr. and Mary E. (Tomkins)Schneider was his mother. He graduated from L. S. U. where he lettered in football, was a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity, of the “L“ Club, and was a Cadet Captain. He operated a grocery store with his brother-in-law, W. S. McGuire. Frederick Hall Schneider married Anna Mary Davis, daughter of Edward Hugh Davis and Julia (Blackburn) Davis. Frederick Hall (Sr.) and Anna ‘Nan’ Mary (Davis) Schneider’s children were (1) Edward Davis Schneider, (2) William Henry Schneider (died in infancy), (3) Nan Davis Schneider, (4) Frederick Hall Schneider, Jr., and (5) Margaret Barker Schneider (died in infancy). During his career he was a member of the School Board and President for 12 years, Commissioner of the 5th District Levee Board and President for 12 years, member of Knights of Pythias, of the Shriners, of Phi Kappa Phi, of Rotary Club, President of the local L. S. U. Alumni, on the Board of Directors of the 1st National Bank, member of the Board of Directors of O’Neil McNamara Hardware Company (Vicksburg), and a member of the L. P. Town Council. For 44 years he operated a hardware business, farmed and owned ginning interest. He acquired 2,800 acres of land. His promotion of flood control led the 5th District to present him a Shriner’s ring and a fine watch “in appreciation of his valuable services in connection with Flood Control Legislation.”
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902. Frederick Hall Schneider signed the charter for the bank. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members and Member of the Board of Directors was Frederick H. Schneider.
From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Schneider, Frederick Hall, Jr. “Tedd”, younger brother of Edward Davis Schneider (Sr.), and son of Frederick Hall Schneider, Sr. and Anna Mary Davis Schneider, also graduated from L. S. U., in engineering, and was a member of the football squad and the “L” Club. After graduation he joined F. H. Schneider & Sons to manage the wholesale radio and electrical department, and operated Sherwood Plantation. He served on the Police Jury, the Grace Episcopal Church Vestry and was a director of the Federal Land Bank Association. He and his wife, the former Sara Regenold, daughter of Fred Porter and Gussie Henderson Regenold, were the parents of four children: (1) Sara Ann Schneider, (2) Frederick Hall Schneider, III, (3) Gay Schneider and (4) Nanette Schneider. Their son, Frederick Hall III, is an L. S. U. graduate, and farms on Sherwood Plantation where he and his wife, the former Constance Allen, and their 6 children make their home. He is active in farming, church and civic affairs. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
L.P.H.S. FOOTBALL: Head coach Frank Byerley’s 1922 championship team had Tedd Schneider as the water boy for the team.. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
BRIARFIELD ACADEMY: The name ‘Briarfield’ was chosen, some say, because the property donated by Mrs. Nan Williams and Teddy Schneider, heirs for the building & spacious grounds was one big briar patch. Other state that the name honors the Rebels, a company raised in Carroll during the Civil War. “ A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Schneider, Frederick Hall, III
BIOS: The son of Frederick Hall Schneider, Jr. and Sarah Regenold Schneider, is Frederick Hall Schneider, III. He is an L. S. U. graduate, and farms on Sherwood Plantation where he and his wife, the former Constance Allen, and their 6 children make their home. He is active in farming, church and civic affairs. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902. One of the Board of Directors in 1975 included Fred H. Schneider, III. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
NORTH LOUISIANA FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION: It had it’s start in 1933 during the depression. One of the First Board of Directors included Frederick H. Schneider. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. An even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. Serving on the present vestry is Fred H. Schneider, III. Sr. Warden, and Ronald B. Ford, Jr. Warden. The present rector is Charles M. Seymour, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BRIARFIELD ACADEMY: Fred Schneider served on the first Board of Directors of Briarfield Academy, which opened on Sept. 16, 1969, as of 1977 he is still serving on the Board. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members was Frederick H. Schneider, Jr.. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Schneider, Harry Graham, Jr.
BIOS: H. G. Schneider, Jr.’s father was Harry Graham Schneider (Sr.) and his mother was Mary Ellen Johnson Schneider. His brothers are James J. Schneider and Samuel Lowry Schneider.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. An even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. Serving as a present vestryman is Harry Schneider, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1975: Harry G. Schneider, Jr. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Schneider, Harry Graham Sr.
BIOS: Harry Graham Schneider is the son of Edward Davis Schneider, Sr. and Jessica Atherton Graham Schneider. He is the younger brother of “Ned” Edward Davis, Jr. Harry Graham Schneider attended L. S. U. and LA. Tech. He was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha. He joined the firm of F. H. Schneider & Sons, Inc., in 1947 and became manager of the hardware and sporting goods dept. In 1968, the company dissolved, ending 70 yrs of service. He joined the administration of the 1st National Bank in 1965, first as a member of the Board and then assistant to the President. Since 1970 he has been President. He was on the Parish School Board for 12 yrs. He is a member of Grace Episcopal Vestry; past President of the Country Club; Director of North La Federal Savings & Loan, and director of Financial Security. He is married to the former Mary Ellen Johnson, daughter of the James L. Johnsons, and their sons are (1) Harry Graham Schneider, Jr., (2) James J. Schneider, and (3) Samuel Lowry Schneider.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902. One of the presidents of the bank was H. Graham Schneider who was elected in 1969. He is a direct descendant of one of the bank‘s founding fathers. His grandfather, Frederick Hall Schneider, signed the charter for the bank; and his father Edward Davis Schneider was on the bank‘s Board of Directors at the time of his death in 1952. Graham was first elected a director in Jan. 1965. One of the Board of Directors in 1975 included H. Graham Schneider. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. An even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. Serving as a present vestryman is H. Graham Schneider. The present rector is Charles M. Seymour, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Graham Schneider was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Schneider, Jessica (Graham)
BIOGRAHIES: “Born Jessica Graham, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Harry Graham at Transylvania Plantation, she has lived in the parish all of her life. She was educated at Dana Hall in Wellesley, Massachusetts. She married E. D. Schneider and their two sons are E. D., Jr. and H. Graham Schneider. She has been active in her church, Grace Episcopal, and served as President of the Women’s Auxiliary of Grace Church. She was twice president of the Garden Club, treasurer of the L. P. P. T. A., and a member of the American Legion Auxiliary. Succeeding her husband in the insurance agency, she has been an active businesswoman. She has served in the highest State office of the Daughters of the American Revolution.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Schneider, Mary Elouise
BIOS: Mary Elouise Schneider is a daughter of “Ned” Edward Davis Schneider, Jr. and Betty Lorraine Johnson Schneider, and a sister to Edward Davis Schneider, III., . Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Schneider, Nan Davis
BIOS: Nan Davis Schneider is a daughter of Anna Mary Davis and Frederick Hall Schneider, Sr. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Schneider, William Henry
BIOS: Son of Anna Mary Davis and Frederick Hall Schneider, Sr. died when very young. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Schneider, William Henry & Fredericka (Hall)
BIOGRAHIES: “William Henry, Sr. & Fredericka Hall Schneider were married in Germany and came to Philadelphia, PA., in the 1830‘s. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Schneider, William Henry, Jr., came to live in L. P. He served in the Confederate Army and fought in the Seige of Vicksburg He married a local girl, Mary E. Tomkins, and they two children: (1) Margaret Barker and (2) Frederick Hall Schneider. At one time they lived in Minden, LA., where Mr. Schneider edited The Minden Democrat. Mrs. Schneider died there, and W. H. Schneider and children returned to L. P. in 1881, where he served as a Commission Merchant and Landing Keeper on the Mississippi River. News accounts refer to him as mayor, and again as a partner with V. M. Purdy as commission merchants.
NEWSPAPERS; The Eagle of June 1869, listed the following municipal officers “William H. Schneider, Mayor; C. R. Egelly, W. F. Pennington, G. W. Smith, Louis Spurlock and John F. Webb, Councilmen. These are active young business men full identified with the interest and business of the town.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
MAYORS: There are no town records before 1876, but other local records mention W. H. Schneider as one of the early mayors in 1869, being an appointee. “ollybrook, organized in the 1800’s. Twice destroyed by storms it was finally rebuilt on land owned by Mr. R. N. Amacker just south of Hollybrook. Albert Scott was one of the pastors. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Scott, Eddie A.
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWII: Scott, Eddie A., SGT., KIA

Scott, Elmira
BLACK CHURCHES; CHINA GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH: Organize in 1935 by Robert Paine and family. Mather Honey Beal, Deaconess Elmira Scott, J. W. Walker and others. Meeting were first held in the Winterfield School. In 1950 land upon which to build a church was bought from Martha Claiborne. Rev. Butler is the present pastor. [1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Scott, Ernest
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastors of the church was Ernest Scott. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Scott, John W.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1878: John W. Scott. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Scott, Merle [see Edmondson, Ned

Scott, William E.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was William E. Scott in 1961. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Scruggs, John H. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1863: Dr. John H. Scruggs. (When he died in 1861 his succession included: 1 lot medical books; saddle bags, fixtures, surgical instruments, medicines appraised at $200.00, one medical wardrobe and a shocking machine valued at $15.) “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Searles, Mr.
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’s stand. One of the Judges selected to determine the result of the tilting contest was time keeper Mr. Searles, of Vicksburg, Mississippi. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Seay, John (Doctor)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Elected to the first vestry on July 27, 1873 was David L. Morgan and John Seay. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1875: Dr. John Seay. That year, the paper reported. “A Miasmatic fever is prevalent in the community“. The Watchman, 9/02/1875. 1886: Dr. R. W. Seay elected Vice-President of La. Medical Association. 1890 - 1920: Dr. R. W. Seay, Bunch’s Bend, Dr. F. R. Bernard, Providence; Dr. We. E. Long, Providence. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Selby, Louis
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
Louis Selby was involved in buying a lot and land in the town of Floyd for business. "Between the Rivers"
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1837 & 1853: Louis Selby
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1846; 10th District: Louis Selby “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
“Suits book of 1850 show that the commissioners appointed by the Police Jury to “contract for the building of a courthouse in the town of L. P. were: Thomas Robedeaux Patten, Joseph C. Hollingsworth, Loluis Selby, and Reason P. Bowie.” They contracted with James Fitzpatrick to build, and purchased 212,000 brick from R. M. Campbell to be used in the building. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sellers, Elizabeth M. (Cash)
Elizabeth Cash was the daughter, the daughter of Thomas Cash, died in Jan. 1867, and was buried in Woodland Cemetery in her home town. It was after then that Matthew B. Sellers sold his beloved Oakland. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston. [NOTE: I heard from someone by email, that Matthew B. Sellers went back to Philadelphia, and was building an airplane, maybe even before the Wright Brothers!]
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: “A masque or character portrayal party held at Oakland in the pre-Civil War days illustrated their gracious living. Mrs. Sellers, Hostess of the home, graciously invited her guests to “freely partake of the bountiful supper...” Mrs. Dr. Burwell was mistress of the parlor and dance room: Mrs. Frank Coleman was hostess of the supper room. Guests came dressed as Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Aaron Burr. Mrs. Sellers, the former Elizabeth M. Cash of Philadelphia, took great pride in the home site which overlooked the calm and placid lake. There were trees of cypress, oak, pecan, and magnolia on the grounds. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sellers, Matthew B.
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: Oakland Plantation was first owned by Wiley Taylor. In 1832 Matthew B. Sellers purchased “1,856 acres, cattle, farming utensils, 26 slaves, the crop and all appurtenances” from Wiley Taylor for $20,000. Matthew Sellers served the parish as president of the Police Jury from 1854 to 1858. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
FEDERAL OCCUPATION OF CARROLL PARISH: Union General James B. McPherson established his headquarters on Oakland Plantation, in the deserted home of Dr. Matthew B. Sellers. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sentell, George Washington
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: After Josephine Irish Stowers Van Fossen died in childbirth in 1872, on March 21, 1885, Erwin Plantation was sold at a sheriff’s sale to G. W. Sentell, commission merchant of New Orleans. Erwin Plantation of 675 acres, was bounded on the north of Old River, east by Hope Plantation, south by Vista Plantation, and west by public school lands. George Washington Sentell was married to Mildred A. Dickson. He died in 1896. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Sentell, Mildred A. (Dickson)
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: George Washington Sentell was married to Mildred A. Dickson. They had several children when he died in 1896. His widow, Mildred Dickson Sentell, sold to her daughter, Mrs. Susan Rebecca Sentell Barber, wife of Leonard Kellogg Barber, the Erin and Hope plantations and 1/5 interest in the Glen Mary Plantation, for $13,125.00. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Senter, William R. Jr. (Reverend) [see Howard, Linda Anne]

Sessum, Richard“Gale Thompson told me that Richard Sessum related to him that Frank James brought his mother the first cook stove they had ever seen. He reported buying the stove in Delhi, and he said he wanted to present it to the best cook that ever set a table. Whether he purchased the stove or took it, no one ever knew. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
Richard rode horseback from his father's farm, which was located one mile south of the present O. E. Huey farm, to Lyon Bayour School in 1880 [Near the present site of Forest] [Mrs. Van Fossen wrote that there was a school at Forest in 1865... could this be that school?] "Between the Rivers" McKoin

Sessums, Blake
Blake Sessums came from Kentucky and bought land east of the present site of Pioneer in 1848. "Between the Rivers" McKoin

Setton, John (pirate gang member, "Little Harpe")
A former member of the Samuel Mason Gang (pirates). Betrayed the pirate Samuel in 1803 near Lake Concordia. One night while Mason, Setton, and Mays were sitting by a campfire he was treacherously beheaded. Setton and Mays prsented Mason's head to the officials to collect the reward of $2,000. During the delay of obtaining the money they were identified as former members of the gang. They were tried and executed, their own heads placed on poles an adorned the Natchez Trace.

Settoon, Helen
In 1870 across the road from the Oak Grove Cemetery, was a log building which was used as a school and a Methodist Church. Many of the children who attended school lived 9 or 10 miles away and had to leave home before daylight and did not return until after dark. Some of the pupils who attended this school were Charlie Herring, Wes Herring, John Settoon, Helen Settoon, Young Settoon, Minnie Johns, Tiny Johns, George H. Castleman, W. H. Castleman, Theresa Reneau, Andrew Jackson, Henry Lawton, Milties Robertson, and Bill Green. “Between the Rivers”, by McKoin

Settoon, John
In 1870 across the road from the Oak Grove Cemetery, was a log building which was used as a school and a Methodist Church. Many of the children who attended school lived 9 or 10 miles away and had to leave home before daylight and did not return until after dark. Some of the pupils who attended this school were Charlie Herring, Wes Herring, John Settoon, Helen Settoon, Young Settoon, Minnie Johns, Tiny Johns, George H. Castleman, W. H. Castleman, Theresa Reneau, Andrew Jackson, Henry Lawton, Milties Robertson, and Bill Green. “Between the Rivers”, by McKoin

Settoon, Young
In 1870 across the road from the Oak Grove Cemetery, was a log building which was used as a school and a Methodist Church. Many of the children who attended school lived 9 or 10 miles away and had to leave home before daylight and did not return until after dark. Some of the pupils who attended this school were Charlie Herring, Wes Herring, John Settoon, Helen Settoon, Young Settoon, Minnie Johns, Tiny Johns, George H. Castleman, W. H. Castleman, Theresa Reneau, Andrew Jackson, Henry Lawton, Milties Robertson, and Bill Green. “Between the Rivers”, by McKoin

Seymour, Charles M., Jr.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886 & a newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. The present rector is Charles M. Seymour, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Shalcross, Captain
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS; GREY EAGLE: [During the winter] On the 24th, 1840 Jacob Owen took passage on the new & fine steamer Grey Eagle, with Capt. John Shalcross. It was the Grey Eagle’s first trip, and as she was the brag boat of her day. “A Place to Remember“, Pinkston.

Shank, Miss
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS; J. M. White. In the Feb. 23rd 1884 issue: “All aboard the palatial J. M. White…Providence is well represented. Judge and Mrs. Delony, Mrs. Frank Taylor and her amiable relative who accompanies her, Miss Mills of Pennsylvania, Miss Pastoreue, Miss Shank, Capt. Pilcher and Your’s Truly, [J. N. Turner].” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Sharpe, Alice
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: In 1932 - 1933, Unit #37, Mrs. Alice Sharpe was the national delegate. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Sharpton, Hershel
CHURCHES; FREE WILL BAPTIST: It was organized in 1947 from former members of “Corbin’s Ferry Baptist Church” with Rev. W. P. White as pastor. Hershel Sharpton was one of the pastors also. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston [before 1947 was known as CORBIN’S FERRY BAPTIST]

Shaw, Fannie
CHURCHES; LAKE SIDE BAPTIST: First called 7th Street Baptist, because of location, it was organized in 1957. One of the 1st workers in Sunday School was Mrs. Fannie Shaw. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Shay, Iola
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Iola Shay. “A Place to Remember”

Shearer, Charles E.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was Charles E. Shearer in 1876. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Shearer, Ed [could be Charles E. Shearer, as listed above]
LOCAL STORIES; TOURNAMENT OF KNIGHTS: “In 1875, the Carroll Tournament Association, the Knight’s ring tournament association, B. H. Lanier bought out Ed Shearer’s one third interest in the organization.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Shelby family
CHURCHES; METHODIST: In 1831 / 1832 a little mission at L. P. taking in various settlements above and below the lake. A number of families of Methodist proclivities including the Worthingtons, Shelbys, Princes and others. The Rev. Washington Ford of Pearl River was in charge and had the first camp meeting ever held on Lake Providence. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Shelby, J. A. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1867: Dr. J. A. Shelby. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Shelton, L. R.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was L. R. Shelton. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Shendon, George A.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1868: George A. Shendon. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Shepherd, Arthur (Mrs.) [see Hider, George]

Shepherd, George
TRANSPORTAION; AIRPORTS: Lake Providence Flying Service had a runway, office, and hangar located 2 miles south of town. Charlie Davis, Buzzie Tomlinson and George Shepherd had a hangar at the L. P. Flying Service. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Shepherd, Roy Kimberlin (see, BIOGRAPHIES: Rushing, Pleasant Monroe)

Shepherd, Piannah (see Delony, Piannah)

Shepperson, David
CHURCHES; PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF L. P.: On land first donated by Govy Hood in 1852, Rev. Hugh Bradsahw had the dedication of the new brick church on Nov. 24, 1963, with Earl Wiggins and David Shepperson participating. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Shields, Harry
CHURCHES; PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF L. P.: On land first donated by Govy Hood in 1852, Rev. Hugh Bradsahw had the dedication of the new brick church on Nov. 24, 1963, with Earl Wiggins and David Shepperson participating. A Memorial Prayer Chapel in 1975 was dedicated in the memory of the late Harry Shields of Stamboul Plantation. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston
PLANTATIONS; STAMBOUL: “Stamboul located in Ward Two is the present home of Mrs. Harry Shields.” [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Shields, Jessie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “owner of dress shop, hostess of Stamboul” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Shields, Leo
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, ROOSEVELT or O’HARA’S SWITCH:
Originally named O’Hara’s Switch after a timberman who ran a railroad switch line to connect with the main road from the interior. Named changed to Roosevelt in honor of the President. A guest of Lee Shields’ Brokenburn home, Theodore Roosevelt hunted with Ben Lilly. The home of Leo Shields near Roosevelt was purchased in 1907 from the Muir-Nicholson estate, and the hunting party used the Shield’s home as a base, hunting on Bear Lake near the East Carroll-Madison parishes border. John M. Parker, a New Orleans friend of the President, and Mr. Shields had shared in buying a large block of land near Roosevelt. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Shields, Tom
OTHER CROPS: “A few experiments I the production of pecans have been tried. Two of the largest orchards are the Tom Shields orchard at Transylvania and the Ransdell orchard planted at the Olivedell Plantation in 1900. Wholesale production of pecans never became widespread.” “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Shields, Tom, Jr.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902. One of the Board of Directors in 1975 included Tom H. Shields. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Shepherd, Ann (see Marsh, Jeff & Sons)

Shoo, John W.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “John W. Shoo was a deputy sheriff and a constable appointed by Governor John McEnery.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Short, Hugh
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1844 & 1846: H. Short. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1856: Hugh Short. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Short, Will
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: Another team from Providence won the championship of north Louisiana in 1872. The players included W. A. Blount, Jim Leddy, Will Short, Thad Smith, Jim Aiklen, and Vail Montgomery.

Sibly, William
PLANTATIONS; LICK SKILLET: 523 acres, located in T.20, N.R. 12E, located near Swan Lake, called ‘Lick Skillet’ once owned by Mrs. Julia Mathews, widow of Thomas C. Mathews, was then jointly owned by William Sibly and William D. King. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Sikes, Alice [see Perry, Buford]

Simmons, A. G.
L. P. BECOMES A HIGH SCHOOL; NOTES 1908: A three story brick building was erected in 1908, with A. G. Simmons the contractor, at a cost of about $6,799. “A Place to Remember”

Simmons, Henry
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Henry Jones remembered favorably by many was a merchant. In 1896 he erected a nice residence south of the courthouse. Today the house is occupied by his son-in-law and daughter, the Henry Simmonses. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Simmons, Jensie ‘Aunt’
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, CORBIN’S FERRY:
Sometime before the Civil War, Colonel Corbin came to a spot of the Bayou Macon where a ferry connected East and West Carroll. Colonel Corbin returned to Georgia, leaving the mark of his name on the community. 1928. In 1957 Aunt Jensie Simmons, reputed to be 110 years old, recalled that when she was a girl of 13 she worked in the household of Colonel Corbin when he first came to East Carroll. She was born in Georgia and her father was Captain Wyly’s mess cook during the Civil War. When Colonel Corbin returned to Georgia, Jensie stayed and married and went to live in Floyd in West Carroll. She had only 1 husband, 11 children, seventeen grandchildren, and nineteen great grandchildren. She now lives with her daughter. [1977] “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Sitton, Albert
“Next came the use of acetylene lighting for the business houses. In 1892 Albert Sitton built the first electric plant on the north side of Lake Street, and the Police Jury installed two lights in its office.” “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Sitton, Elsie (Mrs.)
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was made possible by the donation of 10 acres on North Hood Street by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Skinner, N. C. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1859: Dr. N. C. Skinner. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Skipwith, George G. [this could be George Skipworth]
CLERK OF COURT; 1837: George Skipwith. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Skipworth, George
Govy Hood and his sister Lucinda Hood Everett Chambliss (Mrs. Robert J.) in 1837 donated a site for the Carrollton Bank, lot #52, ‘to be used as a banking house or Office of Discounts and Deposits of the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad.’ Further requirements were that the building be of brick and not less than two stories high. Horace Prentice was president of the company and George Skipworth was the cashier.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
TOWN OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, THRU THE EYES OF A VISITOR IN 1840: “There was a bank, a branch of the Carrollton Bank of New Orleans; and an insurance office--both of these prosperous and profitable. I remember well some of the officers of the bank: Mr. George Skipworth, by originality of character , was one of the most marked I ever knew. His father held a consular position in Parish where he was born. He called himself a Virginian, and to that many of his peculiarities were attributed.” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Slagle, T. J. (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members of whom Mrs. C. E. Newman was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Smith, Alwine (Mulherne)
THE LAW; JUDGES: In 1974 due to the heavy case load the Legislature created an additional Judgeship for this District (9th). Attorney Alwine Mulherne Smith of Tallulah was elected to this office, and became the first and only woman so elected in Louisiana. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Smith, Dorothy (see Marsh, Jeff & Sons)

Smith, Edna Faye (Miss)
E. C. LIBRARY: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. Miss Elizabeth Cammack was appointed as its’ first librarian. Miss Myra Bishop, assistant librarian; Mrs. Naomi Rosenzweig, Miss Edna Faye Smith, and Miss Mary Belle McCain as assistants, and Mr. George Wise was the 1st bookmobile driver. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Smith, Frank
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS: A. W. Roberts comments that he took pleasure in recommending the Illinois [Steamboat] to the traveling public. Captain Cheek and clerks, Spears and Jameison, are polite and gentlemanly officers as ever controlled a boat. Then that best of stewards, Frank Smith, late of the Bell Lee, is on her doing duty. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Smith, G. W.
NEWSPAPERS; The Eagle of June 1869, listed the following municipal officers “William H. Schneider, Mayor; C. R. Egelly, W. F. Pennington, G. W. Smith, Louis Spurlock and John F. Webb, Councilmen. These are active young business men full identified with the interest and business of the town.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Smith, John
“The following is an example of land dealing by absentee land owners after Louisiana became a state in 1812. The Baron de Bastrop and the John Adair claim are both mentioned.
The land transaction in which the Adair claim is mentioned is found in old Notarial Book A., page 60, ‘John Smith, resident of Baton Rouge to Charles Hubb, resident of Ouachita Parish, a deed to 950 acres of land, being a part of Baron de Bastrop grant, known and distinguished in the Ludlow Map of the State of La., to be a part of General John Adair’s claim, deed by said Adair to Sevard Claiborne and purchased by said Smith, as it will appear in Recorder’s Office, Parish of Ouachita, consideration $1200.00. This land the western half of Section 8 and the whole Section 5, agreeable to the platt and survey executed by me, John Gilmore, in the beginning of Year 1822 and deposited in the Judge’s offices of the parish of Ouachita and Baton Rouge, this the 24th day of May, 1822.’
On the same page we find John Gilmore purchasing from John Smith section 7 and the half of section 8 west of Bayou Macon on April 11, 1822. Thus, we know these two land transactions involved a part of what is now West Carroll Parish and we also see that dealing or speculating in land by absentee landowners began early in our history and continued for over a hundred years.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Smith, Reverend
BLACK CHURCHES; MT. WADE BAPTIST CHURCH: Located in Monticelll and been in existence since about 1941. It has only had two pastors: Rev. Smith and R. B. Allen. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Smith, S. W., Jr.
BUSINESSES AND RECREATION; Banks: “The Bank of Dixie, formerly the L. P. Bank, celebrated its 75th in 1973. The 1st president of this bank was S. W. Smith, Jr.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Smith, Thad
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: Another team from Providence won the championship of north Louisiana in 1872. The players included W. A. Blount, Jim Leddy, Will Short, Thad Smith, Jim Aiklen, and Vail Montgomery. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Smith, Tom G.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Tom G. Smith was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Smith, W. T.
RECREATION AND SPORTS: The True Louisianians, organized in 1873, included W. G. McRae, James Lyons, J. F. Cannon, W. T. Smith, J. W. Dunn, James Turner, George Powell, Paul Jones, and W. K. Spurlock. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Snellgrove, Paul
CHURCHES; PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF L. P.: On land first donated by Govy Hood in 1852, Rev. Hugh Bradsahw had the dedication of the new brick church on Nov. 24, 1963, with Earl Wiggins and David Shepperson participating. A Memorial Prayer Chapel in 1975 was dedicated in the memory of the late Harry Shields of Stamboul Plantation. Paul Snellgrove is the present pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Snerling, Jack
LAW; THE THREE COURTHOUSES; The 1st meeting of the Police Jury of the newly formed East Carroll Parish was held on Wednesday, May 30, 1877, at the Courthouse. Appointed to the Jury by Governor Francis T. Nichols was Jack Snerling. He was duly elected and qualified for the parish of Carroll, and held over by virtue of the law dividing the parish. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Snyder, Alonzo
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1854; 10th District: Alonzo Snyder. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Soear, Ernestine K. (Miss)
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: In July of 1920 tow of the teachers employed for schools in E. Carroll was Miss Nita Mitchell at Sondheimer, and Miss Ernestine K. Soear at Transylvania. “A Place to Remember”

Sparrow, Anna
Third daughter of Edward and Minerva (Parker) Sparrow. She married John Nelson Decker, and they are the ancestors of Charles S. Wyly.

Sparrow, Edward
BIOGRAPHY: Edward was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1810. He was educated at Keyan College in Ohio and came to Louisiana in 1831. He practiced law at Vidalia in Concordia Parish. Edward and Minerva Parker Sparrow had two daughters, Fannie and Kate, whom were born before they moved to Carroll Parish. General Sparrow died on July 4, 1883, and was buried at Arlington Plantation.
Edward Sparrow was a Whig candidate for Governor of LA. On. Jan. 23, 1861, the Secession Convention met in Baton Rouge, Edward Sparrow represented Carroll Parish.. On Jan. 26, 1861, LA seceded from the Union, and Sparrow was one of the two delegates elected to attend a covention of seceding states in Montgomery, AL., on Feb. 4th. He was an agent for the Union Bank of LA., in New Orleans, a law partner at various times with Balfour, Stacy, Goodrich, Montgomery, and Walsworth and served as Chairman of the Committee to settle the affairs of the former Parish of Carroll. He donated a lot on Church St. for the Episcopal church to be built in Providence where he was a vestryman. General Sparrow ruled over his feudal domain with an iron hand. He made every major decision and no one questioned him.
LAW; JURIST AND ATTORNEYS, EARLIER DAYS: General Edward Sparrow was a much honored lawyer and jurist. During the Mexican War he commanded the Sparrow Volunteers. He came to Carroll Parish to live in 1852. He represented this parish as a member of the La. Secession Convention. In 1861 he served as a delegate to the Confederate Constitution Convention at Montgomery, Alabama. After secession he was chosen as one of Louisiana’s senators in the Confederate States Congress. Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1852 & 1855: Edward Sparrow. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN: Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: The Sparrow House, a hotel, was situated on the south side of Washington Street, and east of Fifth Street. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember
CHURCHES; MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH: “On July 14, 1859 General Sparrow donated to the Macedonia Baptist Church two lots on Arlington Plantation. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
On May 17, 1870 Governor H. C. Warmouth appointed a commission that selected the courthouse site consisting of Edward lda’s death, in 1852 for $49,999.95. Ulysses S. Grant and other Federal officers occupied Arlington during the time of the ’Grant’s Canal’ episode, stabling their horses in the double parlors. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
Edward Sparrow bought several other plantations including: Calhoun, Hopewell, Midland, and The Island.
LARGE SLAVEHOLDERS: One of the large slaveholders in the parish was Edward Sparrow. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PEOPLE: In 1860, Carroll was the second richest cotton producing parish in Louisiana. Five of the top ten producers in the state that year were from Carroll. Some were extremely wealthy, such as General Edward Sparrow, who, at 49 years of age, had real and personal property valued at one and a quarter million dollars.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
RECONSTRUCTION: “The Police Jury was penniless, and former Confederate senator, Edward Sparrow, is credited with securing state funding from carpetbag governor, Henry Clay Warmouth, for rebuilding the levees in Carroll Parish.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sparrow, Fannie [see Ashbridge, Fannie]
PLANTATIONS; ARLINGTON: Daughter of Edward and Minerva (Parker) Sparrow. She married Alexander Mitchell Ashbridge in 1864 and lived in the Ashbridge House on the grounds at Arlington Plantation. They had a daughter which they named Fannie Ashbridge. Fannie married C. A. Voelker, June 7, 1890. Daughter Katie married T. B. Snodgrass. The Voelkers are descendents of the Ashbridges . “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sparrow, Kate
Daughter of Edward and Minerva (Parker) Sparrow. She was first married to George F. Sanderson, at Arlington. They produced no living heirs. She later married George W. Foster. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston. Together with his father-in-law, Gen. Edward Sparrow, George bought Bellaggio Plantation. They lived their during the Civil War where they felt safe from Union gunboats.

Sparrow, Minerva (Parker)
Minerva Sparrow died in Tennessee in Dec. 1879, while visiting her daughter. She was buried there in TN.
“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. On May 5, 1871, Mrs. Minerva (Parker) Sparrow, wife of Gen. Edward Sparrow, gave three lots on the eastern edge of Arlington Plantation to the vestry of Grace Church. Grace Church moved to Lake Street in 1887 because of the persistent flooding of the Mississippi River. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BLACK CHURCHES; ST. JAMES AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL was established by an emancipated slave, Richard Allen, 1861. By 1968 a log cabin was built on land deeded by Mrs. Minerva Sparrow. Because it was so close to the Mississippi River they moved it to the corner of Brown and Second in 1891. Rev. B. Alex Gibson is the present pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Spellacy, Father
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: Father Quelard came to St. Patricks in 1873 and was followed by Father Spellacy in 1874-1875. Father Ouellard returned in 1875 and remained here until 1880. Carroll Wathchman; April 22, 1875: “Father Guelard has organized a choir at the Catholic Church and has a new fine organ and Miss Frances Stassner is to perform every Sunday.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Spencer, C. S.
BLACK CHURCHES; ST. PAUL MISSIONARY BAPTIST’s first service in 1910 was held at Bunch’s Bend. It is now located on Holland Delta Road on the road on the Oswalt Plantation. C. S. Spencer ,of Eudora, of Eudora, now serves as pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Spencer, H. M.
PLANTATIONS; PANOLA: In the succession of R. W. Williams, dated 1870, Panola Plantation is described as being bounded on the south by Highland Plantation, which was owned by H. M. Spencer. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Spencer, James G.
PLANTATIONS; HIGHLAND: Highland Plantation was first owned by Dr. E. Benevell of Lexington, VA. It was created from a combination of Lone Wolf and Highland and was on Old River in Bunch’s Bend. After Benevell the next owner was James G. Spencer. It had a mill house, a corn mill and an engine boiler. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Spencer, W. B.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1869: W. B. Spencer. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Spinette, John
LAKE PROVIDENCE CEMETERY: A local record states that John Spinette built a wrought iron fence around the cemetery in 1877. The cemetery is located at the corner of Gould & Lake Street with entrance from both streets. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: In 1880 Jason Hamilton was made Commissioner of Quarantine, assisted by John Spinette. In Sept. the Yellow Fever Board consisted of Dr. W. E. Long, Dr. J. L. Davis, and “members Franklin and Sutton from the Town Board”. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Spurlock, Drury
EMAIL: From - Tue Jul 14 10:20:55 1998
“The people I am trying to locate are the Spurlocks. Drury Spurlock and wife Lucy Fuqua. Their children: (1) Joseph, wife was Louise Segrest, (2)Eliza Jane, husband Charles H. Webb, (3) Martha, husband Thomas Jefferson Collins, (4) Robert, wife Louisa M. Haywood,
(5) James, wife Sigis M. James, (6) Drury F., wife ?, (7) David, wife California Keller, (8 & 9) children Joseph and Jackson who died as young children, probably around 1860-1870.
The Spurlock family came into the Carroll Parish area of Louisiana before 1830 from Wilkinson Co., Mississippi. Do you have any information of the Wade Plantation and the Hall's Plantation? VIRGINIA (Stewart)

Spurlock, Louis
NEWSPAPERS; The Eagle of June 1869, listed the following municipal officers “William H. Schneider, Mayor; C. R. Egelly, W. F. Pennington, G. W. Smith, Louis Spurlock and John F. Webb, Councilmen. These are active young business men full identified with the interest and business of the town.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Spurlock, W. K.
RECREATION AND SPORTS: The True Louisianians, organized in 1873, included W. G. McRae, James Lyons, J. F. Cannon, W. T. Smith, J. W. Dunn, James Turner, George Powell, Paul Jones, and W. K. Spurlock. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Stacy, Mr.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1838: Mr. Stacy. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Stagg, Myron
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: “The church is located on Davis Streets. Recent pastors listed: George Nelson, a native who served as a Navy chaplain during WWII, Paul Elledge, C. A. Martin, Doug Cheatham, Dr. Ira Cole, Myron Stagg, and Paul Kolb.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stampley, James
CHURCHES; LAKE SIDE BAPTIST: First called 7th Street Baptist, because of location, it was organized in 1957. One of the 1st workers in Sunday School was James Stampley. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stanfill, J. J.
NEWSPAPER; June 7, 1873: The Eureka Base Ball Club: Mr. W. M. Abbott, the light and airy Deputy Clerk of Carroll, was chosen to look after the money as Treasurer, and Mr. Charles Sweet, Captain of the Field; with Hugh Leddy, Lieutenant. The following are the playing nine, who are to immortalize themselves this season; Charles Sweet, Catcher; Hugh Leddy, pitcher; Frank Armstrong, first base; Frank Leddy, second base; Thomas Leddy, third base; Eugene Leddy, short stop; James Dunn, left field; Abbe Richard, centre field; J. J. Stanfill, right field.

Stanford, Nancy (see Hood, Mrs. Harbird Hood)

Stanley family
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA CHURCH OF CHRIST: The 1st church of this denomination was a government project which was organized in Transylvania, with the Stanley, Dacus, and George families meeting in their homes. They later used the former Melbourne Baptist church building. During WWII a church was built south of Transylvania. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Stanton, William & W. A. (architects)
LAW; THE THREE COURTHOUSES; On July 1, 1901, the old courthouse was replaced by a new building which was dedicated by Pecan Grove Lodge. The cornerstone bore the names of W. W. Heard, Gov. of La., and members of the Police Jury. Constructors were Enoch-Harris, and William and W. A. Stanton were the architects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Starnes, J. Paul
CHURCHES; LAKE SIDE BAPTIST: First called 7th Street Baptist, because of location, it was organized in 1957. One of the pastors was J. Paul Starnes. The present minister [1977] is Rev. Roderick Herrington in the new church located on Schneider Lane, near the lake. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stassner, Frances (Miss)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: Father Quelard came to St. Patricks in 1873 and was followed by Father Spellacy in 1874-1875. Father Ouellard returned in 1875 and remained here until 1880. Carroll Wathchman; April 22, 1875: “Father Guelard has organized a choir at the Catholic Church and has a new fine organ and Miss Frances Stassner is to perform every Sunday.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Steel, Hiram
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: A 1873 issue: “Hon. Hiram H. Steel, District Attorney.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Steele, Joe
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with E. J. Hamley as one of the Directors. The 2nd President was R. J. Walker, and J. Sidney Guenard was the 3rd President, serving in 1908, with Herman Stein as vice-president. One of the presidents of the bank was Joe Steele in 1967.[1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Stein, Herman
L.P.H.S. FOOTBALL: L.P.H.S. The Panthers championship team in 1922 included Herman Stein.. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with F. X. Ransdell as one of the Directors. One of the Directors was Herman Stein. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Stein, Jacob
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Jacob Stein was an early officer of Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stephens, Alice [see Delony, Alice Stevens]

Stephens, Nassau William
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. One of the clergymen in this new church was Nassau William Stephens. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Stephens, Tobias (see Delony, Edward J.)
Tobias Stephens, bought land in the Goodrich Landing area in 1846, and brought his family to Carroll Parish. A daughter, Alice Stephens, was born in Warren Co., Miss., on June 30, 1840. Alice married Edward James Delony on June 21, 1860. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stephenson, J. D.
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: Some of the well-remembered teachers in 1914 were Miss Margaret Murphy at Waddell, Miss Ola Johnson teaching Domestic Science at L.P., Miss Mary Hall, J. D. Stephenson and Miss Robie Williams. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Sterling, Misses
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS; J. M. White. In the Feb. 23rd 1884 issue: “All aboard the palatial J. M. White…Providence is well represented. There is a lively party of young ladies en route for the Mardi Gras, the Misses Sterling of Washington Co. MS. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Stevenson, Henry
BLACK CHURCHES; KING SOLOMON BAPTIST CHURCH: It was organized in 1911 near Shelburn, later moving to Carrollton Plantation on LA. Hwy 65 north of town belonging to Mr. Keener Howard. First pastor was Stephen Gray. One of the pastors was Henry Stevenson. Rev. G. C. Carr has served as pastor since 1938. [1977]. A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Stewart, Benjamin
Bonnidee Settlement was opened up in the 1850’s. This settlement was located just west of Boeuf River on the Prairie Mer Rouge and Lake Providence road. Pin Hook (Oak Grove) was on the same road. In the late 1840s and 1850’s vast immigration from the east to the west took place and many of these travelers crossed the Mississippi River by ferry at Vicksburg, came up the river road to Lake Providence and then crossed the Macon and Boeuf swamps over the Prairie Mer Rouge, Lake Providence road. Sometimes there would be 25 or 30 wagons in the train, according to C. C. Davenport’s Looking Backward”. These travelers could not go far in one day in rainy weather. Often they camped within a short distance from where they camped to night before. A few stopped to settle on the Macon Ridge. Those that crossed both swamps would stop in Prairie Mer Rouge buy supplies, thus adding to the economy of the little town.”
These settlers were like the usual run of people. Women worked hard along with their slaves, saved their money and bought more land and slaves, but there was a question whether or not the land grants made by Spain would be honored by the Unites States government, from France. This caused a few settlers to discontinue improvements on the farms while others left. One of those leaving was my great-grandfather, Ben Stewart, who had come from Alabama in a covered wagon; but, as soon as he found that the Baron de Bastrop’s heirs were suing the federal government in an effort to clear the land title, he decided not to get mixed up in such land. He was on his way back to Alabama when he found land for sale cheap in Smith County, Mississippi, and there he purchased a section and settled down. Had he stayed in Morehouse, I could have claimed to be a native, perhaps, rater than an immigrant.”
[See also BIOGRAHIES: Davenport, Isaiah ]
“One of these early settlers was Benjamin Stewart, my great-grandfather. He came from Alabama to take up the 400 acres of land for himself and his new bride. These settlers came to this new land with every intention of building permanent homes, owning a plantation, and establishing a good life. Despite these lofty aims, these settlers endured many hardships.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Stewart, Eliza [see Eliza Owen]

Stewart, Florence (Miss)
TEACHERS: Listed as one of the parish wide teachers in 1927 was Miss Florence Stewart. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Stewart, Franklin

Stewart, George W.
PLANTATIONS; ELDER GROVE: “George W. Steward sold Elder Grove to Ferd M. Goodrich on July 8, 1873, for $16,500.00: “Bounded on NE by Key Place, Siby Tucker’s Cottowood Plantation on SW”. In 1868, it had been recorded as owned by Mrs. Susan M. Stewart of Natchez.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stewart, John M.
“Roads had begun to improve, and freight wagons were in vogue during dry weather. Overland mail routes were being established for the same reason. In Oak Grove, John M. Stewart was postmaster in 1857.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
“Since post offices during this time were usually in the homes of the postmaster, and farmers of this area always named their farms or plantations, we can assume John M. Stewart’s home was called Oak Grove. I did not find land in his name during the 1850’s." "Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin“
A letter from the National Archives and Record show that a post office was establisehed at Oak Grove, on August 8, 1857, with John M. Stewart the first post master. His plantation was called Oak Grove, perhaps this is where the name of the town began. [Which was usually the case] “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
“In Oak Grove, John M. Stewart was postmaster in 1857.” "Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin“
John M. Stewart purchased a lot for commercial use in the new town of Oak Grove. William J. Corley donated the land in 1860 and on Feb. 13, 1860 lots sold for $100 to $200. "Between the Rivers", by McKoin

Stewart, Onley
Onley Stewart purchased a lot for commercial use in the new town of Oak Grove. William J. Corley donated the land in 1860 and on Feb. 13, 1860 lots sold for $100 to $200. "Between the Rivers", by McKoin

Stockner, Dora
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Dora Stockner . “A Place to Remember”

Stockner, E.
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: E. Stockner served as Mayor from 1877 to 1878. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stockner, Max E. [see Nelson, Selma Sadie]

Stockner, Max F.
1929 ECHO: Max is a Junior at East Carroll Parish High School. The 1930 and 1920 E. C. CENSUS shows that his father is Zell Stockner who is a retail dry goods merchant, was born in Louisiana @1884. His mother's name is Rae, she was born in Tennessee around 1888.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902. One of the Board of Directors in 1975 included Max F. Stockner. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Max Stockner was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stockner, Rae
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Rae Stockner. “A Place to Remember”

Stockner, Zell
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Zell Stockner was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
EDUCATION: In 1946 Zell Stockner was on the School Board. In 1952 Zell was elected President of the School Board, and when he died Max Stockner filled the unexpired term of his father on March 24, 1954. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Stone family
The Stone family fled the Yankee raiders in 1863 to Tyler Texas, where they remained until the war was over. Kate Stone's mother lost two sons in the service of their country (Civil War). The third son returned to the old family home. Upon return they found their slaves occupying their home, many of their possessions gone, the field uncultivated and grown up in weeds, the orchards in a state of decay, and the stock gone. The family picked up without any help to build anew. "Between the Rivers", McKoin.

Stone, James
Brother of Kate Stone. James married a Mrs. Groves, a widow and owner of Eureka Plantation . They had 2 sons and a daughter, Kate Stone Emanuel. They lived for a while in Iowa Park, TX., when they separated he moved back to Tallulah, where he ran a drugstore for several years before his death.

Stone, John
John Stone, brother to Kate Stone, and a lawyer in Monore, LA., married Nancy Layton and had one son who died in infancy. After his wife Nancy died he married Margaret, her sister, who died. Years later married Virginia Robb of Edwards MS.

Stone, Kate
BOOK: “Brokenburn”, by Kate Stone, is a journal she wrote during the Civil War, of her life on the plantation. Her mother, was a sister to John Ragan, a teacher in Tyler, Texas, at the end of the Civil War.
Kate’s family lived in Madison Parish, Louisiana these biographies include excerpts from her journal.
Kate married Henry Bry Holmes, from N. C. He was the son of Dr. Henry and Julia Bry Holmes. Kate and Henry were married in 1869, where he managed a plantation in Ouachita Parish, was clerk of court of Madison Parish, and later was sheriff for four years. Kate had 4 children; Only Amanda Julia and her brother, William Stone Holmes grew to adulthood. William married Lydia Wycliff, they left no children. He died in Monroe, LA. He became a planter and built Wayside, where he died in 1912, and where Kate eventually died in Feb. 1972, at 82 years old.. “Brokenburn”, by Kate Stone.

Stone, William R.
William R. Stone, sister to Kate Stone, head of the household, married Florence Jones, they had one son. William ran a mercantile store in Omega, until his death from war wounds. Brokenburn Plantation was in the succession of William R. Stone, with James R. Stone, the administrator, on July 26, 1877, and sold to Mrs. Florence P. Stone, widow and tutrix, 1,280 acres in all, 600 acres is East Carroll and 680 in Madison Parish, (W.½ of NW½ , S. 13, NE½ S. 14). “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Storms, G. P.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was G. P. Storms. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Story, L. E.
TEACHERS: W. T. Robinson became Principal at Transylvania on March 3, 1942. L. E. Story succeeded Robinson as principal. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Stowers, Gabriel
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Josephine, daughter of Ann and George Irish, married Gabriel Stowers. Gabriel was a son of William and Margaret Stowers. Gabriel purchased lots 18, 19, and 20 from Charles Morgan, and bought 513 acres, and also adjoining section 17, from Alexis Sappington, 163 acres. These purchases became Erin Plantation. Here is where Gabriel and Josephine raised three sons. He died in the late 1850‘s or early 1860‘s. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Stowers, Josephine (Irish )(see BIOGRAPHIES: VanFossen, Samuel)
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Josephine was the daughter of Ann and George Irish. The charming well-educated Josephine married Gabriel Stowers. When Gabriel died in the late 1850’s or early 1860’s, this charming young widow, rich in her own rights, petitioned in 1862 to remain tutrix of her minor sons: Lewis, Edward, and Gabriel, Jr. “It is my intention, at an early date, to intermarry with Thomas I. Van Fossen of New Orleans.“ The marriage lasted for ten years, when in 1872, Josephine Irish Stowers Van Fossen died in childbirth. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Stowers, Lewis
PLANTATIONS; LEWISTON: Located at Bunch’s Bend, was a part of the estate of Lewis Stowers in 1835. Stowers had purchased 978.4 acres in 1842 from George Irish, who called it the Irish Place, and an additional purchase from Margaret Barker and Henry Carpenter brought the acreage to 1,866 acres. Stowers died in Kentucky in 1848, and his will left 622 acres to each of his three youngest sons, Franklin, William, and Lewis Edward. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Stowers, William
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: In his last will and testament, William Stowers named his 5 sons, Samuel, Gabriel, Franklin, William, and Lewis Edward Stowers, and a daughter, Jane as his heirs. To his “beloved wife Margaret” went 700 acres of land in Bunch’s Bend, “where we now reside”. To the three younger sons “all the balance of the tract of land on which we reside, but to the oldest son, Samuel Stowers, was bequeathed “a sum of money equal to ¼ of the value of the land herein given to my three younger sons.” The land they resided on was Lewiston Plantation.

Strong, Alex
BLACK CHURCHES; CENTRAL BAPTIST NO. 2: Organized in 1935 and located at the corner of Artaud and First Streets, under the leadership of L. L. Virgil. The 1st pastor was Alex Strong, a Civil War veteran. E. L. Carter is the present pastor. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Stuart, W. T. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1861: Dr. W. T. Stuart, Dr. Robert McNutt, Dr. L. Richardson, Dr. D. F. Blackburn. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Sullivan, Mamie
TELEPHONE COMPANY: During the yellow fever epidemic of 1903 - 1905, it was the sad duty of the telephone operators to report the deaths. Miss Mamie Sullivan and Annie Doran were operators during this era.
“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sullivan, Paul
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Summers, Guy
TEACHERS: Listed as one of the parish wide teachers in 1926 was Mr. Guy Summers. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Surles, Alphy Pittman
BIOGRAHIES: “Alphy Pittman Surles moved to the parish from Georgia. He first worked for his mother‘s brothers here, James G. (Jim) and J. Walter Pittman, Sr. Later he managed Bellagio Plantation “Mr. Pitt” was a pioneer cattleman in the parish, owned & operated a slaughter house at Alsatia. With Mr. Bob Nicholson, he harvested the first local rice crop. He helped back the Rust brothers in their development of the cotton picker. He and Robert Amacker were charter members of the LA Farm Bureau and both held offices in the organization. As co-founder of Hollybrook Gin, he also helped establish the Hollybrook Flour Mill, and owned an interest in the Hollybrook Mercantile Company. With a partner he started the International Harvester Company, and was also a dealer in horses and mules. Mr. Kennedy was at first a partner of A. P. Surles in the Providence Equipment Company. He owned a large section of the old Bagdad Plantation on the lower edge of town on south Sparrow & Madden Drive.
He married Blondell Hawk and their children were: (1) James Surles, (2) Albert Pittman Surles, (3) Jesse Walter Surlers, (4) Evelyn Surles, and (5) Martha Surles. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members and also on the Board of Directors was A. Pittman Surles. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Surles, Margaret (Frye)
Margaret Frye married J. Walter Surles. Margaret became managing editor of the Delta News in L. P. in 1963. Although an unsuccessful candidate for State Representative in 1975, she was instrumental in obtaining a Vo.-Tech School for the E. C. area. According to Ed Stimel, then director of P.A.R., she is a personal friend of Governor and Mrs. Edwin Edwards, and has often been a guest at the Governor’s mansion. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
NEWSPAPERS; The Delta News, Margaret Surles served as one of the publishers in 1964, and worked in every phase of the paper’s work. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
Margaret helped start The Delta News and served as editor, reporter, and photographer, becoming managing editor of this in 1963. Although an unsuccessful candidate for State Representative in 1975, she was still instrumental in obtaining a Vocational-Technical School for this area, according to Ed Steimel, then Director of P. A. R. She is a personal friend of Governor & Mrs. Edwin Edwards, and has often been a guest at the Governor‘s mansion. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Payne Pinkston.

Surles, J. Walter
BIOS: Blondell Hawk Surles and Alphy Pittman Surles’ son, Walter, became a Justice of the Peace. He married Margaret Frye, and they have 2 daughters, Blondell & Eugenia. Eugenia Surles married Stephen Ham, and they have children. Blondell Surles has not married. She works as an archeologist at nearby Poverty Point. Descendants still in East Carroll are his sons, Albert and J. Walter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember” [*NOTE: Walter Surles was the J.P. that performed marriages for my sister and for me.]

Sutton family
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not molest the farmers and later titles could be cleared. On an old map, I found the following improvements, as the farms were called at that time. The Floyd, Henry, Kent, Rollins, McGuire, Bebee, and Sutton, all located on the Cook Terry Road, and near Floyd were the Lindsey and McGinpio farms. In Old Book A, page 44, I found the Rollins purchasing their land from the U. S. Government on October 14, 1835. Their descendants are with us today, one of whom is Mrs. Willie Mae Dillard Roberts of Oak Grove.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: In 1880 Jason Hamilton was made Commissioner of Quarantine, assisted by John Spinette. In Sept. the Yellow Fever Board consisted of Dr. W. E. Long, Dr. J. L. Davis, and “members Franklin and Sutton from the Town Board”. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Sutton, Anna B. (Mrs.)
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Mrs. Anna B. Sutton was employed as the Hospital Administrator in 1972, succeeded shortly by Thomas Bagby who still remains today. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Sutton, Marguerite
1929 ECHO: Marguerite was listed along with the juniors at East Carroll Parish High School in 1929.
1930 EAST CARROLL CENSUS: Shows that Marguerite was living with her father, Joseph H. Sutton, a farmer, and her mother, Blanche (Green) Sutton, a bus driver, a brother, Edward, 5 years younger than Marguerite, who was 20, and the mother-in-law lived with them also, Maggie Green, from Mississippi. [picture on left]

Sutton, W. M.
PLANTATIONS; VISTA: W. M. Sutton was the early owner of Vista Plantation. It was located 6 miles above town. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Swator, Amos
“Roads had begun to improve, and freight wagons were in vogue during dry weather. Overland mail routes were being established for the same reason. A mail route was established through this territory by the 1850’s which ran as follows: Vista Ridge to Caldonia, 15 miles, postmaster, Amos Swator, October 19, 1854. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Sweet, Charles
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: The Eureka B. B. C. Mr. W. M. Abbott, the light and airy Deputy Clerk of Carroll, was chosen to look after the money as Treasurer, and Mr. Charles Sweet, Captain of the Field; with Hugh Leddy, Lieutenant. The following are the playing nine, who are to immortalize themselves this season; Charles Sweet, Catcher; Hugh Leddy, pitcher; Frank Armstrong, first base; Frank Leddy, second base; Thomas Leddy, third base; Eugene Leddy, short stop; James Dunn, left field; Abbe Richard, centre field; J. J. Stanfill, right field.

Sweet, Marion A.
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: A 1873 issue: “M. A. Sweet, Recorder.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Henry Jones remembered favorably by many was a merchant. In 1896 he erected a nice residence south of the courthouse. Today the house is occupied by his son-in-law and daughter, the Henry Simmonses, Charles Hicks, another sheriff and member of the School Board, is mentioned in records for 1875. David Jackson was Clerk of Court and Marion A. Sweet was recorder.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Swoope, L. F., Jr. (see Cammack, Nancy)

Tatman, Anna (Miss)
TRADGEDY STIKES: Miss Anna Tatman, who served for thirty years as the Health Unit Nurse in E. C. was murdered after a local election, setting off a race riot. Miss Tatman was murdered at her home and her house was set afire. Four black youths were arrested and one of them was tried, convicted and sentenced for the crime. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Taylor, Amber (Mrs.)
E. C. LIBRARY BOOKMOBILE: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. Mrs. Amber Taylor has been librarian on the bookmobile for many years. The 1st bookmobile traveled more than 60,000 and carrying more than 250,000 books into the homes of East Carroll. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Taylor, F. M.
NEWSPAPERS: We are informed that our friend F. M. Taylor, Agent, has invented a self-adjustable corn prop, made of galvanized wire, and of a strong substantial make, to be used for protecting corn stalks from being blow down in case of heavy winds. The props are put up in packages of two dozen each and is purely a home invention. Planters desiring to see the prop can do so by calling at Mr. Taylor’s store, where he will be pleased to explain the manner in which the instrument is to be used and make special terms and reduced rates for large lots. From the Banner-Democrat newspaper
NEWSPAPERS: Aug. 21, 1886: Our enterprising planter Mr. F. M. Taylor, is running his electric lights every night and hopes to demonstrate their usefulness as a worm destroyer. There is no doubt that the fly lays its eggs during the night, and while flying among the cotton stalks thousands of them are attracted to the flame and killed. Last year he was late in getting his electric plant, hence his experiment was not successful. We wish him success in his invention as it will add much to the wealth of the cotton district.

Taylor, Felix H. G.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was Felix H. G. Taylor in 1885. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Taylor, Frank (Mrs.)
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS; J. M. White. In the Feb. 23rd 1884 issue: “All aboard the palatial J. M. White…Providence is well represented. Judge and Mrs. Delony, Mrs. Frank Taylor and her amiable relative who accompanies her, Miss Mills of Pennsylvania, Miss Pastoreue, Miss Shank, Capt. Pilcher and Your’s Truly, [J. N. Turner].” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Taylor, Gilbert
BLACK CHURCHES; EVENING STAR MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH NO.2: Established in 1935 on No Mistake Plantation, LA, Hwy 134. The people living on the plantation built the church with the permission of the owner M. Sam Mitchiner. One of the people involved in building the church was Gilbert Taylor. The first pastor was Frank Davis. The present pastor is Frank W. Wilson.[1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Taylor, H. E.
CHURCHES; FREE WILL BAPTIST: It was organized in 1947 from former members of “Corbin’s Ferry Baptist Church” with Rev. W. P. White as pastor. H. E. Taylor was one of the pastors also. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston [before 1947 was known as CORBIN’S FERRY BAPTIST]

Taylor, Mary (Miss)
TEACHERS: Listed as one of the parish wide teachers in 1926 was Miss Mary Taylor. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Taylor, Mattie
The Saturday Evening Post of June 15, 1968, had this to say about them [Cole Younger and Frank & Jesse James] "A lady by the name of Mattie Taylor, a banker, once rode with a federal agent at the age of 14 years in an effort to avenge the death of her father, who had been killed by an outlaw in Texas. This she accomplished and years later, when she was a banker and had money, she tried to find this officer to help him. She had heard indirectly he was in need. One day her brother sent her a clipping from the "Commercial Appeal" in Memphis dated in 1903. This clipping was an advertisement for the Cole Younger and Frank James "Wild West Show: that was coming to Memphis and when she arrived, the circus train was already on the side track. There wee crowds of horses, Indians, and cowboys in the show, and both Cole and Frank had Pullman accommodations on the circus train. When Miss Taylor boarded the train, she found Cole and Frank seated drinking soft drinks. Cole, she said, was a stout florid man with a pleasant manner, and he rose to greet her whole the waxy James remained seated and did not speak or remove his hat. The man she sought had died a few days earlier and was buried in Arkansas. Miss Taylor said of Cole Younger and Frank James, 'These two old men had fought many battles together, during the border strife and later led dangerous lives. Now this was all they were fit for, to show themselves to the public like strange, wild beasts of the jungle.'"

Taylor, Maude (Miss)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1897, Miss Maud Taylor was 1st assistant at Providence school; Miss Mary Beard was 2nd Assistant, and Miss Katie McCulloch, 3rd Asst. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Taylor, Pat
CLUBS; PERFORMING ARTS: The Providence Players is a group of theatrically inclined citizens met in February, 1974, to gratify the needs for the performing arts. The Providence Players in 1976 had 40 members and 50 patron or season ticket subscribers. Charter members making up the Board were Peggy Madden, Dr. Bernard Waxman, William Gore, Kelly Salemi, Margaret Barham, Alice Amacker, Pat Taylor and Gracie Salemi. This group has presented four plays at the L. P. H. S. in the past two years.” [1977] From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Taylor, Sidney
BLACK CHURCHES; EVENING STAR MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH NO.2: Established in 1935 on No Mistake Plantation, LA, Hwy 134. The people living on the plantation built the church with the permission of the owner M. Sam Mitchiner. One of the people involved in building the church was Sidney Taylor. . The first pastor was Frank Davis, succeeded by S. Jackson, G. C. Gable, Ted Taylor, and Sylvester Brown. The present pastor is Frank W. Wilson.[1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Taylor, Susie
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was Susie Taylor in 1898. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Taylor, Ted
BLACK CHURCHES; EVENING STAR MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH NO.2: Established in 1935 on No Mistake Plantation, LA, Hwy 134. The people living on the plantation built the church with the permission of the owner M. Sam Mitchiner. Two of the people involved in building the church was Gilbert Taylor and Sidney Taylor. The first pastor was Frank Davis, succeeded by S. Jackson, G. C. Gable, Ted Taylor, and Sylvester Brown. The present pastor is Frank W. Wilson.[1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Taylor, Wiley
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: Oakland Plantation was first owned by Wiley Taylor. In 1832 Matthew B. Sellers purchased “1,856 acres, cattle, farming utensils, 26 slaves, the crop and all appurtenances” from Wiley Taylor for $20,000. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Tebbetts / Tibbetts, Hiram B.
“H. B. Tibbett & Company leased a plantation below L. P. on Aug. 26, 1864 Captain Joseph C. Lee, a Confederate of the Missouri Guerrillas, with 200 of his guerrillas made a raid on Jordan Trass, who were the parents of 7 sons and 5 daughters. Their son, General, Jr., a graduate of Southern University and Tuskegee, is at present the principal of the Lake Providence High School. Prior to that he was a classroom teacher, principal of G. W Griffin High School, & a soldier for 3 years.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
CARROLL SKIRMISHES, 1864: There were sporadic raids of Lee’s along the river and Union offensives west of the Bayou Macon. On May 29th, the Federal post at Lake Providence was dismantled, and the companies of Negro soldiers concentrated at Goodrich’s Landing post, under the command of Colonel A. Watson Webber. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
On Aug. 26, 1864, Captain Lee, with 200 guerillas, raided the plantations south of Transylvania leased by Hiram B. Tebbetts. In his report to Vicksburg, Confederate Colonel Webber recounted the guerilla activity, noting the “…murder of four white men and several colored people.” He wanted this gang of highwaymen to remain on Bayou Macon as their protectors and retaliate on the Yankee lessees in the vicinity.
Also on Aug 26, when Captain Lee and 200 guerillas raided the plantations south of Transylvania leased by Hiram B. Tebbetts, killing the 4 white men & several colored people, in retaliation Webber took Doctor Richardson as hostage for the return of a clerk named Webster, who had been kidnapped by Lee. The Federal force, 230 mounted Negroes under the command of Major C. H. Chapin, 3rd U. S. Colored Cavalry, destroyed a few loyalists property, crossing into Pin Hook and Floyd burning those villages and killing 12 Confederate partisans in the process. Lee offered no resistance to Chapin, and the Union force returned to Goodrich’s Landing. Reference: Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
PLANTATIONS; CONCORD: “The Tebbett brothers, Horace and Hiram, both married young Carroll Parish widows with large land holdings. Hiram B. married Laura Sophia Watson, widow of Clayton Boone Watson. They had a daughter Georgianna. He named his several land holdings, bought from the Grahams and the Benjamins, “Concord Plantation”, for his home in New England. “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1842: Dr. Larche, Gorham, and Hiram Tebbette. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
LARGE SLAVEHOLDERS: One of the large slaveholders in the parish was Hiram B. Tebbetts and his wife Laura. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Tebbetts / Tibbetts, Horace / Horance
“After the death of her husband, John Wallis Keene, Frances Elley married Dr. Horance B. Tebbetts. The Tebbett brothers, Horace and Hiram, both married young Carroll Parish widows with large land holdings. Two interesting events which took place during the Tebbetts - Keene married life were the building of a telegraph line to Vicksburg, and the naming of a steamboat “The Mary E. Keene“, for their 14-year old daughter at Sauve Terre. Dr. Tebgbetts paid to have a telegraph line run from L. P., via Point Look Out (which he owned at that time), to DeSu Macon, near Monticello. He married Martha Wyly, who was the daughter of James Washington Wyly and Elizabeth Gillespie. They had one child of this union they named Martha Wyly Templeton. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Tenney, Barnabas G.
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1841; 9th District: Barnabas G. Tenney. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Terral, Elsie Bell (Mrs. F. M.)
In 1953 she was voted “G. P. Wife of the Year” for La. Mrs. Terral has served in Methodist Church organizations and was on the Parish School Board for many years. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Terral, Forrest M. (Doctor)
Dr. Terral was born in Farmerville, La., one of seven children. He attended La. Tech, Louisiana college and then graduated from the L. S. U. Medical School in New Orleans. He interned at Shreveport Charity Hospital and practiced at Weak’s Island before coming to L. P. in 1940. He and the former Elsie Bell of Mangham, La. Are the parents of five children: Michael Ann Terral (Mrs. John Gulick, Jr. of San Francisco), Pamela Terral (Mrs. James Collier of Birmingham, Alabama), Claudia Terra; (Mrs. James H. Woods of Monore, La.), Thomas F. Terral of L. P. and Timothy Terral of Aspen, Colorado. They have ten grandchildren.
Dr. Terral has won various honors and has held many professional and civic offices. He served as State Jaycee President and National Director, Parish Coroner, President of the Tri-Parish Medical Society, first staff Director of the local hospital, Board Member of Louisiana General Practitioners Association, Tuberculosis Association, member of L. P. Country Club, Director and President of North Louisiana Federal Savings and Loan Association, and various hunting clubs. In 1952 he was voted “G. P. of the Year” for La. and the following year his wife was voted “G. P. Wife of the Year”. The Terrals were thus recognized for their civic, cultural, religious and medical contributions.
MODERN BANKS; THE BANK OF DIXIE / THE LAKE PROVIDENCE BANK: The present Board of Directors of the Bank of Dixie consists of Dr. F. M. Terral, L. Wayne Baker, T. E. Hankins, Michael Lensing, H. H. Howington, Jr..“ [Info 1977] Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
HOTELS: The Fischer Hotel was built in 1905 by Mr. A. S. Fischer, later it was owned by Mr. Simon Marcus. Dr. F. M. Terral bought the Fischer Hotel from Mr. Simon Marcus. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was on North Hood Street on land donated by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. One of the doctors on the first medical staff was Dr. F. M. Terral. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS; RECENT [Info in book is from 1977]: A recent physician is Dr. Forrest M. Terral. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Terral, John
BIOS: “John Terral, formerly of Farmerville, after serving as a lieutenant during WWII, moved here and with his brother, Dr. F. M. Terral, purchased a retail seed and feed store. Mrs. Terral is the former Marguerite Labat of France. In the Army he was a member of the 9th Armored Division in Europe. He received the Purple Heart and Silver Star. During the Korean conflict he was recalled to duty to help train troops. As president of the Terral-Norris (E. M. Norris, partner) Seed Compnay, John helped develop a market for singletary peas and also helped introduce soybeans to this area. The Lake Providence Port Elevator on the Miss River was built by his company, and furnishes a market for soybeans in Louisiana & Arkansas. The Terral operations have expanded into neighboring towns and states. John Terral has also served as President of the LA Seedmen’s Association.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
BRIARFIELD ACADEMY: John Terral served on the first Board of Directors of Briarfield Academy, which opened on Sept. 16, 1969, and in 1977 he was still on the Board. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
LAKE PROVIDENCE PORT ELEVATOR: Located on Hwy. 65, 3½ miles south of L.P., the enormous Lake Providence Grain Elevator, built in 1964 is owned by a number of local farmers, John Terral acting President. [1977] The storage capacity is 201,000,000 bushels in 36 storage units. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Terry, James
"James Terry purchases two sections of land in township 24. He was a resident of Chicot, AR, but came to his newly acquired land in 1839. His family never followed him to his new home, but, according to the Terrys, who are residents of the parish now, they are the descendants of James Terry and his common-law negro housekeeper." "Between the Rivers", McKoin.

Therrel, B. F.
“In 1884 , Mayor Therrel was given $200 annually.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: B. F. Therrel served as Mayor from 1877 to 1878. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Thomas, A. L.
COMMUNICATION; RADIO: The local station, call letters KLPL, was established in 1957. The first owner was Emmett McMurray, and the 1st manager was Gene Underwood, now with a Vicksburg station. The present manager (1975) is Norm Davis and the owner is Ben Ennis of Lexington, TN. There is a staff of six some of the regular members are Norm Davis, Pam Ford, Ray Davidson, A. L. Thomas, and Randy Lovell. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Thomas, Floyd
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastors of the church was Floyd Thomas. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Thomas, J. L.
EXTENSION WORK: In the Police Jury minute book of 1909 a salary of $200 was paid to J. L. Thomas each quarter for his service as ’Crop Demonstrator’. The Demonstrators were usually in charge of several parishes. They traveled by horse and buggy, staying several days at the home of a farmer who agreed to carry out some improved farm practice. They gave needed advice on the control of the boll weevil. They instructed the farmer in “thick spacing” of improved varieties of cotton. The Agents vaccinated the hags, mules, and cattle. They were looked upon as a farm hand man who could do almost anything correctly from ringing a bull to the nursing of a baby. Farm Demonstration agents from 1909 and prior to 1920 were as follows: Hugh Montgomery was in 1909, J. L. Thomas for 1909 - 1910, and T. I. Watson from April 1914 - July 1919. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Thomas, Percy
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWI: Percy Thomas, Pvt., died of Pneumonia, June 19, 1918.

Thompson, C. W. (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the thirty-nine charter members was Mrs. C. W. Thompson. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Thompson, Gale
“Gale Thompson told me that Richard Sessum related to him that Frank James brought his mother the first cook stove they had ever seen. He reported buying the stove in Delhi, and he said he wanted to present it to the best cook that ever set a table. Whether he purchased the stove or took it, no one knows.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Thompson, George C.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Elected as vestry on July 27, 1873 was David L. Morgan and John Seay, Wardens. One of the first Vestry was George C. Thompson. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Thompson, J. E.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. J E. Thompson was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Thompson, Lathan
CHURCHES; FREE WILL BAPTIST: It was organized in 1947 from former members of “Corbin’s Ferry Baptist Church” with Rev. W. P. White as pastor. Lathan Thompson was one of the pastors also. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston [before 1947 was known as CORBIN’S FERRY BAPTIST]

Thompson, Shirley (Miss)
The Rainbow Girls Assembly, organized by the Order of Eastern Star in 1952 with 45 members. One of the young ladies that was a Worthy Advisor was Miss Shirley Thompson. From "A Place to Remember ", Georgia Payne Pinkston

Thompson, Zachariah
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: The La. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church sent a minister named Zachariah Thompson in 1851-1855. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Thornton family
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, TRANSYLVANIA:
The Federal Housing Administration built homes, the units consisted of 40 to 150 acres. 99 year leases were set up between the Federal government and the Transylvania Association. Most project members were successful and added to their holdings. These families included the Lee John families, the Fortenberrys, Thorntons, Harpers, Harveys, Outz, Fletchers, and others. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Thornton, P. S.
CHURCHES; MELBOURNE BAPTIST: Located south of Transylvania, Hwy 65, and organized in 1940 by 30 citizens. First pastor was Rev. V. W. Fairchild. When the new building was begun in Feb. 1972, one of the 5 Deacons on the building committee was P. S. Thornton. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Thrasher, R. I. (Mr. & Mrs.)
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. Two of the thirty-nine charter members was Mr. & Mrs. R. I. Thrasher. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Threats, Percy
ALL BLACK CITY OFFICIALS: “In the 1974 elections a negro Mayor and an all black City Council was elected. The Council included Percy Morehouse, Jr., Jesse Magee, Jr., Percy Threats, Grady Murphy, and Ray Frazier. The Chief of Police was Stewart Marshall, also black . The Mayor appointed Mattie Love, black, as Clerk of the Town. Murphy resigned in August, 1975, and in 1976 he was replaced by J. C. Butler, white.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Tilmon, J. L.
BLACK CHURCHES; FRIENDSHIP AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in 1937. The building, located off LA. Highway 134, burned in 1960 but was immediately rebuilt. The 1st pastor was R. W. Burns, the present one is J. L. Tilmon. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Timmin, Reverend
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: “The church is located on Davis Streets. In 1915 - 1917 pastors listed was Reverend Timmin and Duncan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Tinsley, Margaret [see Turner, James Nelson]

Titone, Jasper [see Salemi, Lucie]

Titone, Joseph
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Joseph Titone, Financial Secretary. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic proje give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. Jesse D. Tompkins was one of the 16 knights that marched up to the grand stand.”…. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’ stand. Jesse D. Tompkins’ total, as rendered by the Judges, was 2 rings. His nickname was listed as “Knight of the Black Cap”. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Tompkins, Mary [see Schneider, William Henry, Jr.]

Toney, Tom (Rev.)
CHURCHES; UNITED PENECOSTAL CHURCH: Rev. Tom Toney came from Readland, AR in 1945 and establishing a church at Tulip Plantation, with 15 members meeting in a home for 6 mo. The Tulip Pentecostal Church of the Lord Jesus Christ was built under the leadership of Rev. Toney. In the mid 1950’s the church was moved to Hwy 65 3 miles south of L. P.. The named officially changed to the 1st United Pentecostal Church of L. P. where Rev. Tom Toney still continues as pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Tooke, J. W.
BUSINESSES AND RECREATION; Banks: “The Bank of Dixie, formerly the L. P. Bank, celebrated its 75th in 1973. The 1st Board of Directors included. S. W. Smith, Jr., Jasper N. Hill, J. W. Tooke, Jr., E. J. Hamley, Phil McGuire, J. C. Pittman, & J. E. Reynolds. president of this bank was S. W. Smith, Jr.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Toomer, Dillard [see Nelson, Myrtle Loleta]

Townsend, Georgia R.
MODERN BANKS; THE BANK OF DIXIE / THE LAKE PROVIDENCE BANK: Cashiers are Pat W. Fairchild, Patsy King, George S. Myers, and Georgia R. Townsend in the Bank of Dixie.“ [Info 1977] Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Trass, Elizabeth (Brannum)
Elizabeth Brannum Trass who for a while was teacher (retired in 1973) but returned to manage the Brannum Funeral Home. She had a Master‘s degree +30hrs., and was chosen “Lady of the Lake“, by the East Carroll Advisory Council in 1974. She has also been recognized for “Distinguished Christian Service to the African Methodist Episcopal Church” by the Dept. of Worship & Evangelism. Her husband is General T. Trass, Jr. They have a daughter, Karen Renee Trass, a student at Dillard University. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trass, General, Jr. [see also Trass, Elizabeth “Liz”]
BIOS: General T. Trass, Jr., is married to Liz Brannum, the third daughter of W. A. Brannum and Elizabeth (Hearns) Brannum. General Trass is the principal of Lake Providence High School. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Trass, Mary (Jordon)
BIOS: Remembered here are the late General Trass and his wife, Mary Jordan Trass, who were the parents of seven sons and five daughters. One of there sons is General Trass, Jr. ” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Travis, Edmund R.
In 1832 Carroll Parish was carved out of Ouachita Parish by the State Legislature. Some of the 1st Sheriffs were Duke G. Clary, Thomas Robeau Patton, John D. Harding, Geo. W. Grant, James C. Drew, Edmund R. Travis, William L. S. D. Oliver, Alex G. Lane, and William W. Collins, the last sheriff before reconstruction days disrupted everything. "Between the Rivers", McKoin
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1846: Edmond R. Travis. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Travis, Urban E.
With the result of the lawsuit over the removal of the courthouse from L. P. to Floyd, in July 1853, a majority favored the parish seat being in Floyd, and a site was chosen by the commissioners Thomas L. Wade , Urban E. Travis, Samuel Neil, and George O. Willson. A special tax was to be collected to defray the expenses of erecting a new courthouse and other buildings. “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.

Treffery, Lucille (Mrs.)
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. Lucille Treffery.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Tresevant, George W. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1860: Dr. George W. Tresevant. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Trieschmann, Flo (Mrs. Wm. F.)
She is daughter of Thomas Hugh & Ethlyn Bowers Montgomery. Flo is an L. S. U. graduate. Flora Carolyn “Flo” Montgomery of Tallulah, married King Belser Trieschmann. They have 3 children: Laura Catherine, King Belser, Jr., “Triesch”, and Flora Caroline. Mrs. Trieschmann is a Girl Scout leader, and church affiliation is with Grace Episcopal. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trieschmann, George Vance
BIOS: George is a son of William F. Sr. and Ozell Belser Trieschmann. He is a professor of Architecture at Tulane University. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trieschmann, King Belser (Sr.)
BIOS: William F. and Ozell Belser’s son King Belser, is a LA Tech graduate. He is present owner-operator of the lumber yard. King, who lives in Lake Providence, married the former Flora ‘Flo’ Carolyn Montgomery. They have 3 children: (1)Laura Catherine Trieschmann, (2) King Belser Trieschmann, Jr., ‘Triesch‘, and (3) Flora Caroline. Their church affiliation is Grace Episcopal. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trieschmann, King (Mrs.)
Mrs. Trieschmann is a Girl Scout leader. [1977]” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trieschmann, Robert Wayne
A son of William F., Sr. and Ozell Belser Trieschmann, is Major Robert Wayne Trieschmann of the U. S. Air Force. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trieschmann, William F., Jr.
BIOS: William F., son of William F. Sr. and Ozell Belser Trieschmann. ‘Triesch‘ is a West Point graduate. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Trieschmann, William F. (Sr.)
BIOS: “Forebears of this family came originally from Castle, Germany, to Iowa. William F. Trieschmann came to L. P. to work with the East Arkansas Lumber Company. (The name was later changed to East Carroll Lumber Yard) William F. married Ozell Belser and their four sons are (1) William F. Trieschmann , Jr., (2) King Belser Trieschmann, (3) George Vance Trieschmann, and (4) Major Robert Wayne Trieschmann . From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
EARLY LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion, local Post Number 37, Powell-Martin-Barrett, was named for three heroes who gave their lives for their country in WWI, was organized in 1920. No records are available concerning the Past Commanders of this Post, but records do refer to W. F. Trieschmann as an early leader. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members was William F. Trieschman. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Trim, Preston (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members of whom Mrs. Preston Trim was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Trimble, Frank [see Galloway, James]

Trotter, Nathan
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Tschabold, Dave [see also Warren, Helen]

Tschabold, Helen (see also Warren, Helen)
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. One of the officers was Helen Tschabold, she was also a District Deputy, State Officer. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Tucker, Katherine [see McCulloch, William (Dr.)]

Tucker, Siby
PLANTATIONS; ELDER GROVE: “George W. Steward sold Elder Grove to Ferd M. Goodrich on July 8, 1873, for $16,500.00: “Bounded on NE by Key Place, Siby Tucker’s Cottowood Plantation on SW”. In 1868, it had been recorded as owned by Mrs. Susan M. Stewart of Natchez.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Tucker, Tilghman (see also McCulloch, Dr. William)
Tilghman M. Tucker, after serving as governor of Mississippi and also as a U. S. Senator, made a trip on the Mississippi scouting for "high land" and bought Cottonwood Plantation. Mrs. Tucker died of cholera there, having been exposed to the plague while nursing the sick during the epidemic of 1850. Governor Tucker died here in 1859. His daughter, Katherine, married Dr. William McCulloch. Another descendant of these families who still lives here is William McFarland "Mac" Long, a long-time former sheriff.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Tullos, S. W.
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastors of the church was S. W. Tullos. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Tullos, W. T.
HOTELS/MOTELS: Hugo’s Motel was built and operated by Mr. W. T. Tullos. In 1956, Sidney Guenard built a restaurant which Hugo Morano leased in 1958 and later bought along with the motel. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Turner, A. J.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was A. J. Turner. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Turner, Emma Florence [see Llewellyn Turner]

Turner, Katie (Miss)
ORGANIZATIONS; THE WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION; This organization held its regular meeting at the New Methodist Church Sunday evening of July 21, 1887. Miss Katie Turner was elected president of “The Band of Hope” (the WCTU). “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Turner, James Nelson
BIOS: “Mr. James Nelson Turner, in the newspaper business for over 60 years, was born and reared in L. P.. The son of Peter and Margaret Tinsley Turner and born here in 1859. James was educated locally and went directly into newspaper works, serving as an apprentice as a boy, then becoming an editor, a manager, and finally establishing The Banner Democrat, a weekly paper, in 1878. He knew the parish from its beginnings as a result. His newspaper grew to a circulation of 1,500 in a town of then less than 4,000. He wrote much of the paper himself. He was married to the former Miss Louise Klenn of Missouri.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
RECREATION AND SPORTS: The True Louisianians, organized in 1873, included W. G. McRae, James Lyons, J. F. Cannon, W. T. Smith, J. W. Dunn, James Turner, George Powell, Paul Jones, and W. K. Spurlock. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
NEWSPAPERS; The East Carroll Democrat, 1882: This newspaper began publication in 1882 or 1883 with J. N. Turner, the publisher. Mr. Turner enjoyed a newspaper career of 59 years in the parish. He continued to edit and publish a paper here until he sold the re-named Banner-Democrat to Owen S. Brown in 1941.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS; J. M. White. In the Feb. 23rd 1884 issue: “All aboard the palatial J. M. White…Providence is well represented. Judge and Mrs. Delony, Mrs. Frank Taylor and her amiable relative who accompanies her, Miss Mills of Pennsylvania, Miss Pastoreue, Miss Shank, Capt. Pilcher and Your’s Truly, [J. N. Turner].” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS; The Carroll Banner and East Carroll-Democrat papers merged on Aug. 6, 1892, forming The Banner-Democrat with James N. Turner as owner and both Kennedy and Morgan continuing as editors.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Turner, Jeffery Ealand [see Brock, Sally]

Turner, Sally (Brock)
BIOS: Sally Brock is a daughter of Joseph L. Brock, Sr. and Norris Williamson Brock, born on Oct. 14, 1947. She married Jeffery Ealand Turner on August 24, 1968. They live in Stonewall, Louisiana.

Turner, Llewellyn and Emma Florence
1910, 1920, 1930 CENSUS OF E.C., LA.: 1910: Reldon, Georgia, and Llewelyn, (age six months)living with Florence Blanton, a widower, born @1869. Florence had a son, Blanton, 19 years old; a clerk in a store, dau. Vivian; 16 years old, a telephone operator, daughter, Margaret; 8 years old, and another son John; 7 years old living in the same household. Also a daughter, named Ida and son-in-law, James R. Adams, a Civil Engineer, living there. 1920: Reldon and Georgia living in East Carroll Parish. He is working as a salesman in a retail hardware store. Georgia and Reldon have two girls, Llewelyn, 10 and Florence Emma 7, both born in Louisiana. 1930: Llewelyn, 20, and Emma Florence Turner, 17, both single are living with their mother Georgia Turner who is head of the household, divorced. She is working as a saleslady in a drug goods store.
1929 ECHO: Llewellyn Turner and Emma Florence Turner are both juniors at East Carroll Parish High School.

Turner, Peter
BIOS: Peter Turner and Margaret (Tinsley) Turner had a son James born in 1859 in L.P., LA. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , one of the places of business in Lake Providence was the Boarding House of Peter Turner, which shows a refection of the times. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Turner, T. H.
BLACK CHURCHES; ROSE HILL MISSIONARY BAPTIST was first on LA. Hwy 65, afterwards building & relocating when it was destroyed by a storm onto the Panola Plantation - land donated by the Brown family. Two pastors that have served the church are T. H. Turner and Fred Jones. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Turnipseed, Melinda (Miss)
TELEPHONE COMPANY: In 1923 the Southern Bell System bought the telephone system. Mrs. Margie DuBose, recently retired, was an employee that year. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Tullos, C. W. (Mr. & Mrs.)
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. Two of the thirty-nine charter members was Mr. & Mrs. C. W. Tullos. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Tweedy, Yvonne (Taylor)
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Yvonne Taylor. “A Place to Remember”

Tyler, Harrison
“BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: Harrison Tyler of Bunch’s Bend was president of the School Directors.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Tyrone, Claudia (Mrs.)
EDUCATION: In 1973 Mrs. Claudia Tyrone, Miss Callie Conn, and Mrs. Elizabeth Trass retired from teaching. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Underwood, Gene
“THE GARY BURBANK STORY, Voices In My Head”, by Greg Hoard: “When he arrived at KLPL, he met the boss Gene [Underwood] someone. He was a proper LA gentleman given to impeccably pressed seersucker suits and the occasional cigar. The owner of KLPL was Emmett McMurray, and the 1st manager was Gene Underwood, now (in 1977) with a Vicksburg station. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Underwood, Robert R.
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Robert Underwood, Lecturer. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic projects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
FEDERAL PROGRAMS; FAMILY PLANNING CENTER was established in 1970, headed by Bob Underwood. Louanna Facen, registered nurse, is in charge, assisted by Kathy DeLee, R. N., and Daisy Larry, clerk. A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for the 1968-69 term was Robert R. Underwood. From "A Place to Remember", Georgia Pinkston

Valentine, Mark Jr.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: Son-in-law of Mark Valentine [owner of Oasis Plantation], Captain Harper, was commander of the 3rd Louisiana Cavalry, Co. E., [part of Harrison’s Third Louisiana] was garrisoned at Milliken’s Bend. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
PLANTATIONS; OASIS: Owned by Mark Valentine in 1866: 2,000 acres. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Valkenburg [see Van Valkenburgh]

Van Buren, B. A.
TELEGRAPH: In 1906 B. A. Van Buren was the Manager of the Cumberland Telephone and Telegraph Company. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Vandegar, J. C. (Monsignor)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: In 1934 F. J. Plutz started a new church which was dedicated in 1935. He remained at St. Patrick’s until 1939. He was followed by Monsignor J. C. Vandegar. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Van Denburgh, William L. [see Nelson, Grace Hyland]

Van Fossen, Harry
BIOS: Harry Van Fossen was the son of Thomas L. and Helen Key Beck Van Fossen. He attended the Universtiy of the South at Sewanee, TN. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Van Fossen, Helen B. (Key)
BIOS: Helen was a daughter of Dr. Richard S. Key, of Kentucky. She was a native Louisianan. She is a grandniece of William R. King, of Alabama, and great-great-grandniece of Chief Justice Marshall, and a relative of Francis S. Key, who wrote "The Star Spangled Banner". (for more see Thomas L. Van Fossen)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was built on land donated by and just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. And an even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. 1st person to be baptized in this new church was Helen (Key) Van Fossen. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
WOMEN DOCTORS: Dr. Helen Van Fossen who graduated from the L. S. U. Medical School was the second woman doctor of the parish. She is now on the staff at St. Joseph’s and the Baptist Memorial Hospitals in Memphis. Dr. Van Fossen is a member of the American Society of Internal Medicine. In 1969, she received the American Medical Association’s Physicians Recognition Award and in 1972 was granted special recognition by the American Medical Association for her continuing medical education. She is listed in Marquis’ “Who’s Who of American Women” in 1974-1975. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Digestive Disease Foundation. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Van Fossen, Maude (Mrs. Harry T.)
Email: Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 22:18:26 -0700
“Mrs. Harry Van Fossen, was my grandfather's sister. My family is from Natchez area. Have heard stories of a China Grove Plantation, but that's all. There is a picture that I will give almost anything for except my youngest son. But I do have four teenagers that are cheap. It was published in The Natchez Democrat in March 2, 1969, it was titled “A Distinguished Family“ by Norman Reproductions. Picture is on my Family Page.” JOHN MCPHATE
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members of whom Mrs. H. T. Van Fossen was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston
WOMEN IN JOURNALISM: “One can not overlook the long career of Maude Van Fosse, who for 40 years reported for the local and regional papers.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. One of the officers was Maude Van Fossen, she was also a District Deputy, State Officer. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Van Fossen, Samuel
Samuel and Elizabeth Van Fossen were natives of New York State and Massachusetts. Samuel was a merchant in Louisiville, Ky, and at New Orleans, and also planter. He was married to Elizabeth Fowler. He went to Keokuk, Iowa, where he died of cholera. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Van Fossen, Thomas L.
The 3rd of 4 children born to Samuel and Elizabeth (Fowler) Van Fossen at Hemlock Lake, Livingston Co., N.Y. Samuel was from N.Y. and Elizabeth was from Mass. He was raised in New Orleans and educated in Mass. and gained much knowledge of the classics. He made his way into the world while coming to Louisiana at the age of 14. In New Orleans he became a clerk in a large house and a partner in the business later until the opening of the war. In 1862 he moved to East Carroll Parish engaging in planting of cotton, one of the most successful in E. C. He married Josephine Irish Stowers, daughter of Judge George and Ann Irish of Port Gibson, Mississippi. They lived on Erin Plantation He made a able and efficient police juror. After Josephine died in 1877, he married Miss Helen B. Key. Helen was a native Louisianan, and daughter of Dr. Richard S. Key of Kentucky. They had two children: (1) Harry T. L. VanFossen and (2) Katie Van Fossen. Thomas's plantation was called Elder Grove, while Helen's plantation was Helena. T. L. was a thorough businessman, congenial, and was well-known. He is of Dutch ancestry. His Uncle John Van Fossen was prominent in the political affairs of York state. T. L. was honorable and a devoted family man. He was a member of the I.O. of O. F. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Josephine was the daughter of Ann and George Irish, and widow of Gabriel Stowers, in the late 1850’s or early 1860’s, when she petitioned in 1862 to remain tutrix of her minor sons: Lewis, Edward, and Gabriel, Jr. “It is my intention, at an early date, to intermarry with Thomas I. Van Fossen of New Orleans.“ The marriage lasted for ten years, when in 1872, Josephine Irish Stowers Van Fossen died in childbirth. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.
LAW; THE THREE COURTHOUSES; The 1st meeting of the Police Jury of the newly formed East Carroll Parish was held on Wednesday, May 30, 1877, at the Courthouse. Appointed to the Jury by Governor Francis T. Nichols was Thomas Van Fossen. He was duly elected and qualified for the parish of Carroll, and held over by virtue of the law dividing the parish. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
COMMUNITIES OF THE PARISH, BUNCH‘S BEND:
“In the 1800’s Bunch’s Bend was the wealthiest and most extensively cultivated part of Carroll Parish. Some names of prominence was the Benton family, the Barbers of Erin Plantation, the Keys and Montgomerys of Afton Plantation, the McCullochs of Cottonwood Plantation, the Van Fossens of Elder Grove Plantation and the Williams. This area was greatly altered by the shifting channel of the Mississippi River which swept away much of the rich alluvial land.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
BIOGRAPHIES: “The Van Fossens of E. C. Parish are descendants of Dr. Richard Sewell Key and his wife Helen C. Beck, of Afton Plantation in Bunch‘s Bend, and of Samuel & Elizabeth Fowler Van Fossen, who were natives of New York State and Massachusetts. Mr. Van Fossen was born at Hemlock, Livingston Co., New York, and came to Carroll Parish by way of Mobile, AL, and New Orleans. In 1862, he married Josephine Irish Stowers (daughter of Judge and Mrs. Irish of Port Gibson, MS.) They lived on Erin Plantation. After Josephine‘s death in 1877, Thomas L. Van Fossen married Helen Key Beck of Afton Plantation. Their son Harry attended the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee.” Georgia Pinkston’s “A Place to Remember”

Van Fossen, Maude
“She became associated with The Delta News in 1964. She started her journalism in the 1920's with only a high school education and one point of instruction, "Spell people's names like they spell them", this was said by the late Nick Hamilton, whom she worked with. She was working for the Banner-Democrat after 37 years, then went to work at The Delta News with Mrs. Margaret Surles and Mr. Carlton and they gave her a parish as her field.” LETTER FROM EDITOR dated July 14, 1981.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Maude M. Van Fossen. She received a Silver Certificate on January 8, 1951 for her 25 year membership, and in Sept. 1965 she received a Silver Certificate and Gold Chrysanthemums for her 50 years membership.
“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Van Kirk, George
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was George Van Kirk in 1871. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Van Valkenburgh, Grace G. (Mrs. Henry)
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: “This associate of the Legion, Powell-Martin-Barrett Unit Number 37, was organized in Aug. 1926. One of the charter members included Mrs. Henry Van Valkenburgh. In 1933 - 1934, Mrs. Henry Van Valkenburgh was one of the District Presidents. “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. One of the officers was Grace Van Valkenburgh, she also was a District Deputy, State Officer. On Jan. 8, 1951 she received a Silver Certificate for her 25 year membership. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Wilma Warren Russell. “A Pace to Remember”, Pinkston.

Vaughn, Etta (Miss)
TEACHERS: Listed as one of the new teachers in 1925 was Miss Etta Vaughn. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vaughters, Oeina (see Clement, T. I.)

Vick, Newitt
“While the west bank of the Mississippi River was being settled, there had developed a village on the east banks of the Mississippi River just south of Lake Providence that would soon influence surrounding areas, bringing great destruction to our neighbors to the east, reprisals and uneasiness to the inhabitants between the rivers. Not that the village on the east bank wanted this, but because of its strategic location the village fell victim to forces over which it had no control.
Newitt Vick came to the “Old South” sometime in the late 1700’s or the very early 1800’s, according to the historians. He was a Methodist minister, farmer, the father of 13 children, who had left Virginia society and came by flat boat to the hills of Mississippi, which later became known as Vicksburg. He was a wealthy man.
Others followed Vick from the east, planters with slaves and money, because the Great River was a good route for trade especially after the advent of the steamboat in 1812. Thus a village sprang up and was named Vicksburg in honor of the first settler. The town was incorporated in 1825 and 1835 had a population of 2500.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Vickery, Walter (Mrs.)
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: Subsequent presidents of Unit #37 included Mrs. Walter Vickery on the American Legion’s Women’s Auxiliary. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Vincent, F. Janvrin (Rev.)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Because of the persistent encroachment of the river, they moved the church from just east of Arlington Plantation onto Lake Street, purchasing the lot from Nicholas D. Ingram in 1886 for $350. Rev. F. Janvrin Vincent was rector during the move. He also traveled once a month to All Saints Mission at Transylvania and to St. John‘s Mission at Bunch‘s Bend. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Vining, Alice Yvonne
BIOS: Parents of Alice Yvonne Vining are W. L. & Lorena Vining, of “Ten Oaks” in the Monticello community. Alice Yvonne Vining Orr, who lives in Dallas. From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vining, Billie Jean
WOMEN DOCTORS: Bobbie Jean was the third woman doctor from this parish. She is a General Practitioner and an L. S. U. graduate She married Dr. Albert Donald. The live in West Monroe, Louisiana, and are the parents of four children.

Vining, C. L.
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, HENDERSON PROJECT:
One of the Federal Farm Security projects was established for black farmers. It was originally a part of the Henderson and Carondelet plantations. The Henderson project was established when aroused citizens resented the displacement of long-time resident Negroes when the Transylvania project formed for the whites. Most of these blacks had lived in the Transylvania area prior to the Civil War. The displaced was given first choice of the 78 units . About ½ of them have remained since 1940-41 when it began. Much of this land has been bought by Harry Barrett, C. L. Vining, Lee Johnson, Howard Wise and others. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Vining, Charles L. (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; SONDHEIMER BAPTIST: This church was organized April 15, 1940. One of the 10 Charter Members was Mrs. Charles Vining. Rev. T H. Mercer was the first pastor. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Vining, Clifford
BIOS: Parents of Clifford are W. L. & Lorena Vining, of “Ten Oaks” in the Monticello community. Clifford Vining, who is a contractor in Yuma, Arizona. From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vining, Floyce [see Vining, W. L. & Lorena, also see Hawsey, A. J.]
BIOS: Mrs. A. J. Hawsey was Floyce Vining, one of seven children of the late W. L. and Lorenca Vining.

Vining, Francis
BIOS: Parents of Francis are W. L. & Lorena Vining, of “Ten Oaks” in the Monticello community. Francis Marvin Vining, an attorney-at-law in Monticello, Mississippi. From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vining, Glen
BIOS: Parents of Glen are W. L. & Lorena Vining, of “Ten Oaks”, in the Monticello community. Glen Vining, a pilot of a B-26 with the USAF at Waco, Texas, and a veteran of 52 bombing missions in Africa during WWII. From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vining, Lonnie Gene
BIOS: Parents of Lonnie Gene are W. L. & Lorena Vining, of “Ten Oaks” in the Monticello community. Lonnie Gene Vining Martin lives in Sheridan, Oregon. From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vining, Randall
Randall Vining says that he heard 'old timers' say the Yankees reached the court house and were piling records out to burn when they were driven off." "Between the Rivers", McKoin.

Vining, W. L. & Lorena
BIOS: Moved to “Ten Oaks” Plantation in the Monticello community from West Carroll Parish, was Mr. W. L. & Lorena Vining. They had 7 children. (1) Clifford Vining, (2) Glen Vining, (3) Alice Yvonne Vining, (4) Lonnie Vining, (5) Floyce Vining, (6) Francis Marvin Vining, and (7) Bell Vining. Clifford Vining, who is a contractor in Yuma, AZ.; Glen Vining, a pilot of a B-26 with the USAF at Waco, Texas, and a veteran of 52 bombing missions in Africa during WWII; Alice Yvonne Vining Orr, who lives in Dallas; Lonnie Gene Vining Martin, who lives in Sheridan, OR; Floyce Vining Hawsey, of Ten Oaks, East Carroll Parish; Francis Marvin Vining, an attorney-at-law in Monticello, Mississippi; Bell Vining, of Thermopolis, Wyoming, where he is business manager of an Arapahoe Ranch.” From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Vinson, Mrs. Mary “Mrs. Mary Vinson told me that she knew both the James and Younger Brothers. They had been to her house to see her husband who was a physician. He treated Frank James for a gunshot wound once and both brothers for malaria. She said they were well-mannered men and years later she found it difficult to believe all she read in magazines about them. She credited the James and Younger brothers with saving Floyd from the Yankees.” From “Between the Rivers”, Florence McKoin

Vinson, W. J. P.
W. J. P. Vinson was involved in buying a lot and land in the town of Floyd for business. "Between the Rivers"

Violett, A.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business merchants were A. Violett, F. M. Harp, and William Rous in Lake Providence. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Virgil, Luke L.
BLACK CHURCHES; CENTRAL BAPTIST NO. 2: Organized in 1935 and located at the corner of Artaud and First Streets, under the leadership of L. L. Virgil. The 1st pastor was Alex Strong, a Civil War veteran. A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston
BLACK CHURCHES; PLEASANT GREEN BAPTIST is located on Waverly Plantation owned by Mr. William Wyly. From 1937 to 1976, there have been two pastors: Luke Virgil, Sr.. and Mrs. Luther (Nellie) Darden. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Virgil, O. L.
BLACK CHURCHES; CAIN RIDGE NO. 2: Located on Holland Delta Road and established in 1911, land purchased from Mrs. A. J. Wyly. Andrew Williams is a surviving deacon [1977]. Other ministers have been D. C. Davis, Henry Smith, J. H. Henderson, J. H. Moore, and O. L. Virgil. Fred Jones is pastor today [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Voelker, David Ransdell
BIOS: David R. is the son of Virginia Lee and Frank Voelker, Jr.. He is an LSU student. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Edward S.
CLUBS; AMERICAN LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion was organized in 1920 with one of the Charter members being Edward S. Voelker. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Frank, III, (the 3rd).
BIOS: Frank Jr. and Virginia Lee Voelker‘s son, Frank Voelker, III, went to LSU and Northeast. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Frank Jr.
EAST CARROLL DELTA NEWS; Jan. 28, 1965; PERSONALITY OF THE WEEK: He was born on Feb. 12, 1921 in L.P., where he has resided his entire life with the exception of the time he was in the Armed Services and in college. He attended St. Patrick School of L.P. where he graduated. He attended LA. Polytechnic Institute, at Ruston, where he received his B. A. Degree. Then he went to Tulane University, and then on to Harvard University, where he studied Corporations and Taxes. He completed his college education in January of 1943, and soon after he entered the Marien Air Corps, where he served for three years. He started his own law practice in Oct. 1946. He began the practice that has grown into the present day law firm of Voelker-Ragland-Fox. He is a member of the American Legion, the "40&8", the Farm Bureau, the Rotary Club, and the Execurtive Board of the Ouachita Council for the Boy Scouts of America. He is also a member of the State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He was the first Chairman of the LA. State Soverignty Commission on Interstate Cooperation and a member of the Board of Governors of the National Council of State Government, ???, and is also a prominent member of the St. Patrick's Catholic Church of Lake Providence. On May 24, 1947 he married Virginia Wilson, of Weston, West Virginia. They were married in Chatham, New Jersey by the Catholic Priest, Father Joseph Dempsey. The this union were born six children. His parents are the late Judge Frank Voelker, Sr. and Mrs. Isabell Ransdell Voelker, both of Lake Providence.
BIOS: The older son of Judge and Mrs. Frank Voelker, Sr. is Frank Voelker Jr.. He graduated from Tulane Law School and also attended Harvard. He was a lieutenant in the Marine Air Corps in WWII. He heads his own law firm, which consists of W. B. Ragland, Jr., Charles Brackin and James Crigler. He was chairman of the Sovereignty Committee under Governor Jimmie Davis. He is a member of the Council of State Governments and serves on the Board of Directors of the LA. Bar Association. He married Virginia Lee Wilson. Their children are: (1) Margaret Mullady Voelker, (2) Frank Voelker, III, (3) David Ransdell Voelker, (4) Mary Ashbridge Voelker, (5) Katherine Sparrow Voelker, and (6) George Wilson Voelker. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1948: Frank Voelker, Jr. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Frank Voelker, Jr., Advocate. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic projects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for the 1950-51 term was Frank Voelker. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Voelker, Frank Sr.
BIOS: Frank was the son of Clements August and Kate Ashbridge Voelker. He was born at L. P. in 1892, one of three sons. After graduating from Tulane Law School, he practiced law in Minden and L. P., La. He served for 18 months in the army during WWI, and was Commander of the local American Legion Post # 37, a Department Vice Commander, and member of the 48. Frank and Isabel Ransdell, daughter of Judge & Mrs. F. X. Ransdell, were married in 1918, and had five children: (1) Katherine Voelker (Mrs. F. A. Cain), (2) Frank Cain, Jr.,??? (3) Isabel Voelker (Mrs. Hathorn), (4) Flournoy Voelker (Mrs. Stephen Guenard) and (5) David Voelker. He succeeded his father-in-laws office (6th Judicial District of LA.) in 1936 and remained in that office over 28 years until his death in 1963. (5 consecutive times, without opposition) He was a Charter member of the local Rotary Club, and a member of the Catholic Charities Advisory Board. A lasting memorial to the judge is the E. C. Prison Farm which was established through his aid to prove the intrinsic value of every person and that imprisonment should be rehabilitating, not punitive. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
MODERN BANKS; THE BANK OF DIXIE / THE LAKE PROVIDENCE BANK: The Advisory Committee of the Bank of Dixie is composed of Ted J. Oliver, Frank Voelker, an Mrs. Vail Delony. “ [Info 1977] Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
NORTH LOUISIANA FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION: It had it’s start in 1933 during the depression, through the efforts of a struggling young attorney, Frank Voelker and his wife, Isabel raised $2,500 for the start, and in 1934 they were awarded the 19th Charter in the U. S. One of the First Board of Directors included Frank Voelker. Chosen was Frank Voelker as Secretary and Attorney. Isabel R. Voelker retired in 1969 after 36 years of continuous service. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
THE LAW; JUDGES: Felix Bosworth served as a parish judge, (office abolished after 1845) from 1832 - 1845, called the Judge of Record. His son-in-law, Frank Voelker, Sr., succeeding him and remained until his death in 1963. Frank was married to Miss Isabel Ransdell. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
LAW; JURIST AND ATTORNEYS, EARLIER DAYS: An esteemed attorney and jurist was Frank Voelker, Sr. who served as 9th District Judge for East Carroll, Madison, and Tensas parishes from 1936 - 1963. He was most active in the Boy Scout movement and in Juvenile and Youth work. He received the George Freeman award for distinguished service to social welfare in Louisiana. Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members and of the Board of Directors was Frank Voelker, Sr. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston
*NOTES: Four generations later General Sparrow's great-great grandson married David Flournoy's great-great granddaughter; Frank Voelker and Isabel Ransdell.

Voelker, George Wilson
BIOS: George is the son of Frank Jr. and Virginia Lee Wilson Voelker. George Wilson Voelker is a Briarfield Academy student [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Isabel
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “assisted in organizing and developing a savings company”
Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
NORTH LOUISIANA FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION: It had it’s start in 1933 during the depression, through the efforts of a struggling young attorney, Frank Voelker, Sr. and his wife, Isabel raised $2,500 for the start, and in 1934 they were awarded the 19th Charter in the U. S. Isabel R. Voelker retired in 1969 after 36 years of continuous service. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Voelker, Kate (Ashbridge) [See also Ashbridge, Katie)
PLANTATIONS; ARLINGTON: Arlington passed through several hands, eventually James S. Millikin acquired ownership. When he moved to Millikin Plantation, this long-time friend of the Sparrows sold Arlington and thirty acres of land to Mrs. Kate Ashbridge Voelker, wife of C. A. Voelker, Sr. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Katherine (see Cain, Katherine)
BIOS: Katherine is the daughter of Frank Voelker, Jr. and Virginia Lee (Wilson) Voelker. Katherine Sparrow Voelker is at Hollis College.[1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Margaret Mullady
Mullady Voelker is the daughter of Frank Jr. and Virginia Lee Voelker. She attended College of Notre Dame and LSU. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1948: Frank Voelker, Jr. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Mary Ashbridge
BIOS: Frank Jr. and Virginia Lee Voelker‘s daughter, Mary Ashbridge Voelker, is at Hollis College, Roanoke, Virginia. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Voelker, Stephen (Mrs.) (see also Pittman Brothers)

Voelker, Stephen
BIOS: “Stephen Voelker was born here, the son of Clemens A. Voelker, of German descent, and Katie Ashbridge. He grew up in Lake Providence and after high school attended Tulane University where he majored in business administration. He served in the Army during WWI and was the youngest man from Louisiana to be sent overseas. He organized the Tallulah Production Credit Association and managed the organization during its extension into ten parish. This association greatly aided farmers in increased production. Mr. Voelker moved from Tallulah to N. O., LA where he served as President of the Federal Intermediate Credit Bank until his retirement. He & Dorothy Pittman, daughter of J. W. Pittman, Sr., were married in 1924. Their children are Stephen, Jr., and Eva Stewart.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Voney, Paul A.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. An even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. During the span of fifty years (1926 to 1976) one of the clergymen was Paul A. Voney. The present rector is Charles M. Seymour, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Von Metzradh, Kael
CLUBS; AMERICAN LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion was organized in 1920 with one of the Charter members being Kael Von Metzradh. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Vought, Dorothy (Miss)
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: In July of 1920 one of the teachers employed for Lake Providence was Miss Dorothy Vought. “A Place to Remember”

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