Tuesday, August 24, 2010

C & D Surnames

Cable, Eli (Rev.) - Dutton, G. A.

Cable, Eli (Rev.)
BLACK CHURCHES; NEW ZION BAPTIST BAPTIST CHURCH: Located in Sondheimer, founded by Rev. Eli Cable and other citizens from the Henderson Project, on land donated by Mr. Jerry Ostadal, owner manager of the Sondheimer Lumber Company. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cage, Robert H.
LAW; THREE COURTHOUSES: On July 1, 1901, the old courthouse was replaced by a new building which was dedicated by Pecan Grove Lodge. The cornerstone bore the names of the involved Masons: Robert H. Cage, Grand Master of Louisiana; John C. Bass, Worshipful Master of the local lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cains in L. P. Cemetery:
Cain, Dr. Frank Arbuthnot Born: Dec. 15, 1914 Died: Jan. 28, 2007

Cain, Frank Arbuthnot (Doctor)
DOCTORS: Dr. Cain was born in Slaughter, La., son of Ola Gordon Arbuthnot and Gordon Durr Cain. He was an honor student at Ouachita Junior College in Monroe and in the first graduating class. He received a degree in mathematics, chemistry, and engineering from L. S. U. At L. S. U. he was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and a varsity boxer. He graduated from the L. S. U. Medical School in 1941, second in his class. After interning at the New Orleans Charity Hospital, he entered the U. S. Navy as Senior Medical Officer of the 8th Beach Battalion. He served in North Africa, Italy, and southern France.
He came to L. P. in June of 1946 and started a Family Practice. He and the former Katherine Voelker of Lake Providence were married in 1942. They have three children: Captain Frank A. Cain, Jr. of the U. S. Air Force, Katherine “Kathy” Smith of Houston, and Gordon Ransdell Cain, a practicing attorney in New Orleans. Dr. Cain is noted for his gardening, his wood-working and macramé.
“Find A Grave” website: He was born on Dec. 15, 1914 and died on Jan. 28, 2007. He is preceded in death by his parents: Gordon Dunn Cain , Ola Arbuthnot Cain, and step-mother, Ruth Finklea Cain. Dr. Cain is survived by his wife: Katherine Cain of Lake Providence, Louisiana; son: Frank Arbuthnot Cain Jr. & wife Ann of Brandon, Mississippi; daughter: Kathy Brandt & husband Chris of Magnolia, Texas; son: Gordon R. Cain & wife Kathy of Mandeville, Louisiana; 8 Grandchildren & 4 Great-Grandchildren
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was on North Hood Street on land donated by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. One of the doctors on the first medical staff was Dr. F. A. Cain . “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS; RECENT [Info in book is from 1977]: A recent physician is Dr. F. A. Cain. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cain, Katherine (see Voelker, Frank Arbuthnot)

Caldwell, Aquila Bolton
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1845, 1847, 1852: A. B. Caldwell. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Calhoun in L. P. Cemetery:
Calhoun, Edna M. Born April 15, 1895
Calhoun, William H. Feb. 06, 1893 - Feb. 23, 1975

Cammack in Lake Providence Cemetery:

Cammack, Abner Sam 1872 - 1950 DM W/Emmie Walton Cammack
Cammack, Elizabeth Born April 18, 1901
Cammack, Emmie Walton 1879 - 1950 DM W/ Abner Sam Cammack
Cammack, Mary 06/07/1994 - 06/09/1994 C
Cammack, Valera Jan. 31, 1903 - Dec. 24, 1988 CFH Records

Cammack, Abner Sam III
Abner the 3rd is the son of Abner S. Cammack, Jr. and the former Evelyn Barrow. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Abner Sam, Jr.
Abner Sam Cammark, Jr. was born in 1905 to Dr. Abner Sam Cammack and Emmie Walton Cammack. Abner Sam Cammack, Jr., and his wife, the former Evelyn Barrow, came to East Carroll in 1932. They bought land on the Holand Delta Road in Oct. 1936, and lived there a number of years. Three children were born to them: Nancy, George, and Abner Sam, III. They later sold their land and moved to Columbus, Miss., where they had purchased a cattle farm, Mr. & Mrs. Cammack returned to E. C. in 1967. Evelyn was employed as Parish Librarian from 1967 to 1973.
Nancy Cammack returned to the parish for a period with her husband, L. F. Swoope, Jr., who was employed as Associate County Agent from Oct. 1958 to Oct. 1965.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Abner Sam (Sr.) (Doctor)
BIOGRAPHIES: “Dr. Abner Sam Cammack (1872-1950)BIOGRAPHIES: “Dr. Abner Sam Commack (1872-1950) was a third generation citizen of Coahoma Co., Mississippi. Dr. Cammack received a degree from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1899. In 1900, he married Emmie Walton (1879-1950). Both branches of her family had also moved to Coahoma County early 1800 to homestead and purchase land.
3 children born to this union: (1) Elizabeth, 1901; (2)Valera, 1903, and (3)Abner Sam, Jr., 1905.
After suffering reverses during the early part of the depression Dr. & Mrs. Cammack moved to East Carroll Parish in 1932. He managed Lake View Plantation at the head of the lake until it was sold to the Farm Security Administration as a government project. In March 1938, Elizabeth and Valera Cammack purchased the former Crump place on Holand Delta Road and the family has lived there since.
Abner Sam Cammack, Jr., and his wife, the former Evelyn Barrow, came to East Carroll in 1932. They bought land on the Holand Delta Road in Oct. 1936, and lived there a number of years. Three children were born to them: Nancy, George, and Abner Sam, III. They later sold their land and moved to Columbus, Miss., where they had purchased a cattle farm, Mr. & Mrs. Cammack returned to E. C. in 1967. Evelyn was employed as Parish Librarian from 1967 to 1973.
Nancy Cammack returned to the parish for a period with her husband, L. F. Swoope, Jr., who was employed as Associate County Agent from Oct. 1958 to Oct. 1965.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Elizabeth
E. C. LIBRARY: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. Mrs. A. B. Cammack served as librarian for 6 years, retiring in 1972, with Mary O. Hodgkins succeeding her. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPER; DELTA NEWS: Personality of the Week; Feb. 18, 1965
Elizabeth was born in Coahoma County, Mississippi to Dr. & Mrs. A. S. Cammack. Dr. Cammack was also a farmer. She has one brother, Abe Cammack, now living in Columbus, MS., and one sister, Miss Valera Cammack, head of the local Welfare Office. She attended high school at Blue Mountain College and did part of her college work there, finishing at Mississippi State College for women, and then, after teaching a short time in Clarksdale, attended the University of Illinois where she earned her master’s degree in Library Science. She has put on more library demonstrations than anyone else in the state. She made her home in L. P., living with her sister on their farm above town on the Holland Delta Road where they raise cattle. She is a member of the 1st Baptist Church here in L.P., and although not an active member of any club as such, she take great civic pride in her town, serving on many committees. She works at the local library and to her goes much of the credit for the fact that L.P. has one of the nicest libraries in Northeast Louisiana.
E. C. LIBRARY: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. Miss Elizabeth Cammack was appointed as its’ first librarian. She served for twelve years. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
Elizabeth graduated from Mississippi State College for Women in 1925 and taught in the schools of Mississippi. Later she graduated from the Library School of the University of Illinois. After working one year in Memphis Cossett Library, she was employed by the Louisiana State Library as a library demonstrator. Elizabeth directed six parish demonstration libraries (included E. C.). She came to East Carroll in 1954 to head the new demonstration library here. After the Police jury voted the tax to continue the library, she was named head librarian and served until her retirement in 1966.

Cammack, Emmie (Walton)
Emmie Walton (1879-1950). Married to Dr. Abner Sam Commack (Sr.). Both branches of her family had also moved to Coahoma County early 1800 to homestead and purchase land. “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston

Cammack, Evelyn (Barrow) [see also Cammack, Abner S., Jr.]

Cammack, George
George is the son of Abner Sam Cammack, Jr., and his wife, the former Evelyn Barrow. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Nancy
Nancy Cammack is the daughter of Abner Sam Cammack, Jr., and Evelyn Barrow Cammack. Nancy returned to the parish for a period with her husband L. F. Swoope, Jr. who was employed as Associate County Agent from Oct. 1958 to Oct. 1965. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cammack, Valera
In March 1938, to Dr. Abner Sam Cammack and Emmie Walton Cammack. Valera Cammack and her sister, Elizabeth, purchased the former Crump place on Holland Delta Road and the family has lived there since. Valera Cammack received a B. S. Degree from Mississippi State College for Women in 1926. She taught school for 1 year and worked in Chicago, Illinois for 4 years. In 1933, she became a field Worker with the Emergency Relief Administration in E. C. and continued in the field of social work for the remainder of her career. From 1939-1945, she worked with the Red Cross in Lake Charles, La., and in Atlanta, GA, with the Dept of Public Welfare in Avoyelles Parish as supervisor, and in Grant Parish as Director. In 1945 she returned to E. C. to be Director of the Dept of Public Welfare and remained in this capacity until she retired in 1967.

Campbell in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Campbell, Charles Died Oct. 06, 1935 LA PVT 507 Labor BN OMC
Campbell, Cleo B. Dec. 31, 1912 - Jan. 13, 1990
Campbell, R. H. Sept. 25, 1909 - July 15, 1942

Campbell, John (Rev.)
BLACK CHURCHES; MOUND CHAPEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: It is located some 2 miles west of Transylvania and was established in 1924 by the Rev. John Campbell and was pastor until his death in 1945. Fred Banks is present pastor. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Campbell, R. G.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1880: R. G. Campbell. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Campbell, Robert L.
PLANTATIONS; WISHWELL: Wishwell Plantation was owned by Nannie A. Browder and inherited by Robert L. Campbell, her husband. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Campbell, Robert N.
MAYORS: There are not town records before 1876, but other local records mention Robert N. Campbell as one of the early mayors, 1855 - 1857. “A Place to Remember”
HOTELS: The Providence Hotel was owned by Robert N. Campbell and L. L. Littrell. Old newspapers show that one John G. Chisum was a boarder there for 6 months. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cannon, Anthony
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: There was no preacher in 1864, but the La. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church sent a minister named Anthony Cannon in 1865. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cannon, J. F.
RECREATION AND SPORTS: The True Louisianians, organized in 1873, included W. G. McRae, James Lyons, J. F. Cannon, W. T. Smith, J. W. Dunn, James Turner, George Powell, Paul Jones, and W. K. Spurlock. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Cannon, O. G.
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastoe Rev. Carr is the present pastor. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BLACK CHURCHES; PILGRIMS REST BAPTIST had its beginning at a prayer meeting on Chaney Plantation in 1896. The church has had four ministers: J. Kent, Carr, Owens, & Green. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Carrett in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Carett, Ethel 1899 - May 03, 1941 Age 40

Carlisle in L. P. Cemetery:
Carlisle, Lucille (see Treffery, Lucille Carlisle)

Carlton, A. C.
NEWSPAPERS; The Delta News, published by A. C. Carlton, owner and editor, had its beginning in 1964. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Carmouche, Mae [see Salemi, Johnnie]

Carnley in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Carnley, Emma Huitt Jan. 02, 1879 - June 18, 1966 DM W/ ~ Robert William Carnley
Carnley, Oscar Miles May 05, 1901 - July 21, 1965
Carnley, Robert William Oct. 02, 1876 - Jan. 17, 1942 DM W/ Emma Huitt Carnley

Carnely, Lois
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Lois Carnely. “A Place to Remember”

Carroll, Charles
Is whom the parish of East Carroll was named. Honore Pierre Morancy, the oldest son, was taken in charge by the Abbe Mercier, and educated at St.Mary's College. Madam LePeltier. Victoria and Emile later went to the family of Mrs. Harper, a daughter of Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, and was educated with her son, Charles Harper, at Emmettsburg, under the patronage of Charles Carroll, who furnished the means for his graduation in the profession of medicine. Charles Carroll was the only
Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Honore Pierre's name was changed to Honore Perigny, in gratitude to Madam LePeltier, whose family name was Perigny. After the death of the Abbe Mercier, Honore Perigny
finished his education, and was Professor of French, Greek, and Latin in the college
at Natchez, Mississippi, until 1818, when on the 16th of July of that year he was
married (to Eliza Jane Lowry). He afterwards moved to Louisiana, where he entered
large tracts of land, and at the breaking out of the Civil War was one of the
wealthiest and most prominent planters in that State. He held many public offices,
and died at the advanced age of eighty-six in 1881. When in the Legislature he named
the Parish of Carroll in honor of his benefactor, Charles Carroll.

Carroway, William
COMMUNITIES OF THE PARISH, MONTICELLO:
“John Bishop and William Carroway were large land owners of Monticello in the early days.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Carson, James G. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1860: Dr. James G. Carson, Dr. Thomas O. Means, Dr. Edward Delony, Dr. Andrew Owens. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS: Arlie Plantation was owned by Dr. James Carson. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Carter in L. P. Cemetery:
Carter, Alma M. Dec. 06, 1897 - Sept. 05, 1979
Carter, Benjamin April 29, 1891 - June 14, 1961
Carter, David Wayne Feb. 16, 1955 - June 14, 1955 DM W/INFANT Carter
Carter, Edna Dec. 26. 1919 - Sept. 25, 1937
Carter, Frank Jan. 18, 1894 - July 24, 1947 LA. PVT 347 Inf. 87 Div - WWI
Carter, INFANT Oct. 23, 1953 DM W/David Wayne Carter
Carter, Louise Dec. 19, 1917 - June 01, 1953
Carter, Mamie Ferguson Dec. 02, 1913 - Jan. 17, 1990
Carter, Martha I. Sept. 09, 1893 - Feb. 15, 1967 WIFE (Next to Van W. Carter)
Carter, Richard E. April 03, 1909 - Aug. 08, 1957 LA. MONN 3 USNR - WWII
Carter, Tina May April 09, 1910 - Sept. 16, 1935
Carter, Van W. 02/23/1889 - 06/16/1957 HUSBAND (Next to Martha I. Carter)

Carter, C. W. (Rev.) [Is this the Reverend Carter listed below?]
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH BUILDINGS AT L.P.:
The ‘Little Church Around the Corner’ used in 1873; A new building started in 1875 with services held on Sept. 16 and 17, 1876, the Rev. C. W. Carter officiating; and, on Oct. 6, 1887 the church building on Lake Street, Lot 18, Block 2, which was sold. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Carter, E .L.
BLACK CHURCHES; CENTRAL BAPTIST NO. 2: Organized in 1935 and located at the corner of Artaud and First Streets, under the leadership of L. L. Virgil. The 1st pastor was Alex Strong, a Civil War veteran. E. L. Carter is the present pastor. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Carter, Eula
1929 ECHO: She is listed as a senior during the 1929 year. "Turn on the hose. She'll burn that typewriter up, she runs it so fast. Apparently serious, but when you slip off with her to study, she won't let you do it for laughing. Slightly studious." She is in the Booster Club. [picture on left]

Carter, James H.
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWII: Carter, James H., Pvt., Died of Wounds.

Carter, Reverend
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was Carter. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cartwright in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cartwright, Hudson Freeman April 4, 1868 - Aug. 7, 1942
Cartwright, Vera Ethel Dec. 21, 1894 - Oct. 03, 1971

Cash, Elizabeth M. [see Sellers, Elizabeth M. (Cash)]

Castilow, Billy
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. Billy Castilow served as a Deacon in the church. Present (1976) pastor is Reverend Clyde Coulter. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Castleman, George H.
In 1870 across the road from the Oak Grove Cemetery, was a log building which was used as a school and a Methodist Church. Many of the children who attended school lived 9 or 10 miles away and had to leave home before daylight and did not return until after dark. One of the pupils who attended this school was George H. Castleman. “Between the Rivers”, by McKoin

Castleman, Tom
In 1870 across the road from the Oak Grove Cemetery, was a log building which was used as a school and a Methodist Church. Many of the children who attended school lived 9 or 10 miles away and had to leave home before daylight and did not return until after dark. Some came in surreys; other rode mules or horses.
One of the things for which the pupils asked permission most was to get a drink of water from the bucket in the front of the room. This water was brought by the older boys from Mr. Tom Castleman’s place or from an old tiller well which was nearby under an old oak tree. The children drank from a tin cup or half a coconut shell to which a handle had been attached. This was a very good dipper and would last a session.

Castleman, W. H.
In 1870 across the road from the Oak Grove Cemetery, was a log building which was used as a school and a Methodist Church. Many of the children who attended school lived 9 or 10 miles away and had to leave home before daylight and did not return until after dark. One of the pupils who attended this school were W. H. Castleman. “Between the Rivers”, by McKoin

Catchings in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Catchings, Virginia (see Harris, Virginia Catchings also Harris, Mrs. Wm. A)

Cathey, John
PLANTATIONS; TYRONE: Located 4 miles west of town. Horace Prentice was the first local resident to own the place. He bought Tyrone from John Cathey and wife, Rebecca Liles in 1836. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cathey, Rebecca (Liles) [see Cathey, John]

Cauthen, Frances
TEACHERS: Listed as one of the parish wide teachers in 1927 was Miss Francess Cauthen, public school music was added. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Cawthorns family
“We find land transactions recorded in the Clerk of Courts Office in Oak Grove which show that settlers were coming to this part of the country early in the 1800s. In old Book A., page 119, we find this recording, ‘Abram Eddins sold to Peter Alexander a portion of Section 18 T 20, NR10E, being the same land Lafayette Moore and his wife sold to Eddins on June 11, 1812 and recorded in Book, folio 113.’ Descendants of the Moores are with us today, also the Cawthorns.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorns to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.

Cawthorn, Asbury
“Soldiers, who had left the area to fight, began to come home, some maimed, others ill, and all damaged by the horrors of war, lack of food, & clothing. Many did not come home. Two who did not return were Asbury Cawthorn and John McIntyre. One who did return was Henry De Los Briggs. He had been a merchant and school teacher before going to war; however, soon after returning, he decided to change his occupation. He married in Floyd in 1871 and moved to land he had acquired northeast of the present site of Forest. Here he build a home, owned a farm, built a school house, cotton gin and general mercantile store, and helped restore the South as others did.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Cawthorn, Jim & Chersley (brothers)

Cawthorn, Lud

Cesare, Charles [see Salemi, Theresa]

Chaffe in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chaffe, Olive (see Guenard, Olive Ransdell Chaffe)

Chaffe, John & Charles
PLANTATIONS; GAILLIARD: Galliard Plantation was sold at a sheriff‘s sale to Thomas B. Gailliard early in 1860. Gailliard owned the plantation for 8 years, and then again went under the sheriff’s hammer in 1868, when Mary Benton and Daniel Hubbard bought it. Hubbard latter sold his undivided one-half interest in the plantation to John and Charles Chaffe of New Orleans, and they later sold it to Warren M. Benton. Gailliard Plantation later became the property of F. F. Montgomery and Edward James Delony. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston. [Note various spellings: Gailliard, Gillard, Gilliard, Gillyard used in parish records]

Chaffee, Charles [same Charles Chaffee as above, with brother John]
PLANTATIONS; HAGAMAN: Hagaman Plantation fronting the Mississippi, and located about ½ mile south of L. P., is one of the old places in the parish. It was Lot #1 of the judicial partition of the original Conn Plantation. . Acting for Louise Hagaman on Feb. 24, 1880, C. M. Pilcher sold the plantation to Charles Chaffe of N. O., LA., and the Charles Chaffe conveyed to Ann F. Delony, wife of Edward J. Delony, “Hagaman Plantation”. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Chalmers in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chalmers, Elizabeth (see Nicholson, Elizabeth Chalmers)

Chambers in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chambers, Andrew 1862 - 1940
Chambers, Joe E. Jan. 24, 1885 - Nov. 26, 1936
Chambers, Menervia M. May 15, 1875 - Jan. 19, 1952

Chamberlain, Evelyn (see also Davis, Mrs. J. Preston)

Chambliss, John S.
PLANTATIONS; JEFFERSON RIDGE: Owned by John S. Chambliss. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: Oakland Plantation was fronted on the north side by the lake, on the upper or western side by Bellaggio, below, or on the eastern side by Hood’s home place and on the back, or south, by Jefferson Ridge owned by John S. Chambliss. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Chambliss, Lucinda (Hood Everett)
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH: Earlier than 1843 a Methodist Church was built at. L. P.. A land deed dated March 10, 1843, R. J. Chambliss and wife, Lucinda Hood Everett Chambliss gave a deed to William Glathry, stating that land that began at the east side of Second St….. where the Methodist Church house now stands…... “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Chambliss, Martha D.
Martha was born about 1808 in Fayette, Jefferson Co., MS, and she married Augustus Cook November 11, 1826 in Fayette, Jefferson, MS. She and Augustus had one child, William A. Cook, born about 1828. Her 2nd husband was Thomas T. Bell, married on April 20, 1837 in Lake Providence, Carroll, LA, son of John & Nancy Bell. He was born March 22, 1808 in Kentucky and died about 1873 in Ben Franklin, Delta, Texas. Thomas Bell and Martha’s children: (1)Julia Hooks Bell, born August 10, 1839 in L. P., Carroll, Louisiana; died February 03, 1910 inry Chambliss, married Jenkin Shelby March 31, 1831 in Ouachita Parish, LA. (2) Nathaniel Chambliss, born in Jefferson County, MS. He married 1st, Martha Ledbetter. His 2nd wife was Catherine Gardner on November 30, 1826 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. He married his 3rd wife, Caroline Hale on May 13, 1838 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. (3) Sallie Chambliss. (4) Thomas L. Chambliss, born in Jefferson County, MS.; He married Caroline Davidson July 09, 1835 in Lake Providence, Carroll, LA. Thomas L. died @ 1837 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. (5) Robert James Chambliss, born around 1800 in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. (see BIOGRAPHY: Chambliss, Robert J.) He married Lucinda Hood January 15, 1835 in Lake Providence, Carroll, Louisiana. (6) Martha D. Chambliss, born @ 1808 in Fayette, Jefferson, MS; died around 1884 in Ben Franklin, Delta, Texas. (7) Samuel Lee Chambliss, born April 09, 1814 in Jefferson County, MS. He died @ 1879 in Navarro Co., Texas. He married Jane Truett Scott in Jefferson County, Mississippi.

Chambliss, Robert J.
LAKE PROVIDENCE CEMETERY: On June 22, 1843 land was donated by Robert J. Chambliss and his wife Lucinda S. Hood to promote the “public convenience and to keep sacred the remains of the deceased.” The donated land, located at the edge of town, became the first municipal graveyard.” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
Fauxbourg-Chambliss was the 80-acre tract on which the Robert Chambliss home stood, and it became the southern extension of the town of Providence. In 1854 the family donated the entire tract to the town.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. [see also his wife Hood, Lucinda]
PLANTATIONS; ISLAND PLACE: Island Plantation was near the town of Providence and mentioned in the succession of Robert J. Chambliss when 1,863 acres sold at $10.00 an acre. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Chambliss, Samuel L.
PLANTATIONS; DEERFIELD: “In 1855, William T. Oliver resided at Deerfield Plantation. John W. Epps and Samuel L. Chambliss had a “farming partnership of five years there.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Chambliss, T. J.
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN:
Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: T. J. Chambliss & Company was in business. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Chambliss, Thomas I.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of L. P. during 1835 - 1976 was Thomas I. Chambliss in 1835. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Chandler in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chandler, Katie (see Thomas, Katie Chandler)
Chandler, M. C. Feb. 04, 1835 - May 25, 1902 "Mrs."

Chandler, Julia Ann (see Hood, Harbird)

Chaney, Jesse H.
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the SE of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1844 a mortgage was reported thus: ‘a cotton plantation situated on the east bank of L. P., Township 21, Rg. 12E, Lots 2-8 (902.73 acres), and buildings to be mortgaged for $48,000; improvements, 20 slaves, horses, cattle, 75 hogs, 50 bbl corn, household furniture and farming utensils -- all stand mortgaged to Jess H. Chaney & Charles H. Webb to secure the payment of 150 bales of cotton’.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Chappell in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chappell, Marshall Eugene Aug. 04, 1903 - March 21, 1971
Chappell, Thula Tullos June 23, 1903 - Fe. 10, 1982

Chapell, Clotel
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the thirty-nine charter members was Clotel Chapell. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Chapell, M. E.
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. Two of the thirty-nine charter members was Mr. & Mrs. M. E. Chapell. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Chapell, Vorie
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the thirty-nine charter members was Vorie Chapell. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Chapin, C. H. (Major, Union)
CARROLL SKIRMISHES, 1864: On Aug 26the the Federal force, 230 mounted Negroes under the command of Major C. H. Chapin, 3rd U. S. Colored Cavalry, destroyed a few loyalists property, crossing into Pin Hook and Floyd burning those villages and killing 12 Confederate partisans in the process. Lee offered no resistance to Chapin, and the Union force returned to Goodrich’s Landing. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
WAR’S END: Major C. H. Chapin’s raid brought to a close most military activity in Carroll Parish, although Lee’s guerillas remained in the area until after the war. Desertions became epidemic, draft dodgers and deserters, known as jayhawkers, moved into the area and menaced everyone. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston .

Chapline, F. D.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. F. D. Chapline was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Chapman, Lloyd
FIRE DEPARTMENT: “Volunteer fireman Lloyd Chapman emphasizes that for a town of it’s size, L. P. has excellent fire-fighting equipment and that the water supply is more than adequate.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Chard in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chard, A. R. Sept. 07, 1852 - Oct. 23, 1918

Cheatham, Doug
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: “The church is located on Davis Streets. Recent pastors listed: George Nelson, a native who served as a Navy chaplain during WWII, Paul Elledge, C. A. Martin, Doug Cheatham, Dr. Ira Cole, Myron Stagg, and Paul Kolb.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cheatham, Hugh
A second schoolhouse was erected in about 1872 on a lot which is now the site of Eugene Wilson’s store. There were only rough hew benches and a desk. John Garner was the teacher and Charlie Reneau and Hugh Cheatham are the only pupils known to have attended school there. “Between the Rivers”, McKoin

Cheatham, John L.
CLERK OF COURT; 1860: John L. Cheatham, 13th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cheek in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cheek, Nannie E. 03/20/1879 - 05/05/1957 SISTER (of Eunice Howard) ~ R. K.'s wife

Cheek, Captain
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS: A. W. Roberts comments that he took pleasure in recommending the Illinois [Steamboat] to the traveling public. Captain Cheek and clerks; Spears and Jameison, are polite and gentlemanly officers as ever controlled a boat. Then that best of stewards, Frank Smith, late of the Bell Lee, is on her doing duty. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cheek, Juanita
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Wife, mother, church worker and clubwoman.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Cheek, Steve K.
BRIARFIELD ACADEMY: Steve Cheek served on the first Board of Directors of Briarfield Academy, which opened 1969, and in 1977 he was still on the Board. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cheek, Steve K. (Mrs.) [probably Juanita? above]
CLUBS; L. P. JUNIOR AUXILIARY: “The L. P. Junior Auxiliary was organized in Sept. 1962. Serving as a president was Mrs. Steve K. Cheek. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cherry in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cherry, Esther (see Bolinger, Esther Cherry)
Cherry, O. H. (Olive) 1851 - 1889 @March
Cherry, Olive 1889 - 1891

Cherry, O. H. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1882: Drs. Bernard, Dr. Bell, Dr. W. H. Benjamin, and Dr. O. H. Cherry (Diphtheria). “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
ASSESSORS; 1888: O. H. Cherry. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Chestnut in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Chestnut, Virgie Spires July 25, 1888 - Feb. 20, 1967

Chewning, James J.
EARLY SETTLERS: “Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Chief Ahe-Min-Tubbe
PLANTATIONS; TYRONE: Located 4 miles west of town. This plantation once belonged to Chief Ahe-Min-Tubbe, a Choctaw Indian Chief who was granted the land by the Secretary of War as a “Satisfaction of Claims arising under the 14th and 19th articles of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek” concluded in 1830. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Childers, Hastin M.
PLANTATIONS: The founder, and earliest family that occupied Arlington Plantation was Hastin M. Childers and his wife Matilda McGraw Childers. Parish records of the Childers holdings and of the thousands of dollars donated in his will indicated that he replaced the cabin, the 1st hewed log house on the lake, with a fine Classical Revival home. Hastin Childers died a wealthy man in 1834. In his will he left his mother, Dicy Harris of N. C. $500 annually for her life time; to her son, Houston Harris, $4,000; to the parish of Carroll, $2,000; to the new Orleans Female Orphan’s Asylum, $10,000; to Martha Sellers, $5,000; to Narcissa Jane Hewlett, $1,000 “for her name that was given her for my daughter, who is now no more”; the “slaves falling to my lot, in the division of the community property are to be emancipated and conveyed to Liberia, and to be furnished with tools, provisions and good heavy clothing sufficient to last them one year, and passage money.”

Childers, Matilda (McGraw)
Matilda McGraw married Hastin M. Childers. They had a daughter named Narcissa who died at 16 years old. Her husband Hastin died in 1834. On April 25, 1837, the widow Childers became the bride of Thomas Robedeau Patten, scion of a prominent Ouachita family, Judge Felix Bosworth performed the ceremony. In a year or two she entered a suit against her husband for squandering her money and asked for a separation of property. Patten contended that he had made costly improvements of real and permanent value upon the land and had built a house for $15,000., making the property highly productive and capable of yielding a large revenue, sufficient to meet all the debts existing against it.” Patten died in 1850, and Matilda died Feb. 7, 1852. She left her estate to 2 nieces, Florence Adell Browder and Ann Morehouse Pilcher, both daughters of her sister, Ann. Edward Sparrow, of Concordia Parish was the attorney for Matilda McGraw Patten in her suit against her husband, Thomas Patten, and had written out her will. Sparrow knew and loved Arlington and records show that Edward purchased Arlington in 1852 for $49,999.95. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Childers, Narcissa Jane
Hastin M. & Matilda Childers’ young daughter, Narcissa Jane Childers, fell in love with the handsome young son of the plantation overseer, and of course, marriage with an overseer’s son was out of the question. Narcissa was locked in the attic room (third floor) until she agreed never to see the boy. A large silver tray of food was brought up to her three times a day, and three times a day the food was untouched. She vowed that she would remain true to her one and only love. Day after day, week after week passed and she ate nothing. At last death mercifully ended the romantic struggle. She died at the age of sixteen and today her tombstone lies at the front steps of the house, as a reminder of unrequited love.

Chinaman in Lake Providence Cemetery:
A Chinaman, “A” [NEWSPAPER: died on January 22, 1876]

Chisum, John G.
HOTELS: The Providence Hotel was owned by Robert N. Campbell and L. L. Littrell. Old newspapers show that one John G. Chisum was a boarder there for 6 months. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Choat in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Choat, Cleotis Sept. 21, 1912 - Jan.31, 1956
Choat, Katie Faye Jan. 25, 1937 - Nov. 07, 1979 CFH Records - No Marker
Choat, Robert J. Jeb. 23, 1893 - April 02, 1969
Choat, Sue Jan. 10, 1956 - Jan. 10, 1956
Choat, Vinnie S. Jan. 17, 1894 - May 03, 1983

Chopin, Matthew (Rev.)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: A Roman Caholic Church was built in the old town of Providence in 1859 outside the present levee by Rev. Matthew Chopin, a priest from Millikin’s Bend. It escaped destruction during the Civil War but was destroyed by fire in late 1865. In 1866 Father Chopin bought 5 town lots for a new church. In 1870 construction was completed. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Christian, W. D. (Rev.)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. The Rev. W. D. Christian became rector of the church on July 27, 1873, and resigning on April 1, 1878. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Christon in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Christon, Gussie Oct. 10, 1914 - April 08, 1960 MS. PFC 459 SIG
HV Constru BN- WWII - Negro
Christon, Melvin Dec. 16, 1925 - Aug. 11, 1966 LA PFC 4517
Om Service Co - WW II - Negro
Christon, Missouri 1887 - 1970 Negro - Buried June 13, 1970 - BFH

Christon, Cleveland [see also, Christon, Martha Belle (Brannum)]
Cleveland Christon is a local business man and deputy sheriff. He married Martha Belle Brannum. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Christon, Martha Belle (Brannum)
The second daughter of William Anthony Brannum and Elizabeth (Hearns) Brannum was Martha. She married Cleveland Christon. Martha is listed in Who’s Who of American Women, 1968 & 1970, and Outstanding Personalities of the South (1970). She holds a Master of Arts degree and has 51 hrs. beyond that degree. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
EDUCATION: In August of 1970 Mr. James T. Herrington became Superintendent and Mrs. Jessie Jean Gill as Supervisor of Attendance. She retired and was replaced by Mrs. Martha Belle Christon, a Negro. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Claiborne, Leonard
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Claiborne, Martha

Clark, Benjamin F.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1858: Benjamin F. Clark. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clark, Elaine (see Fortenberry, Quitman & Elaine)

Clark, Howard
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was Howard Clark. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Clarkson in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Clarkson, Cornelia H. July 02, 1897 - Jan. 01, 1967
Clarkson, Letcher I. Sept. 20, 1920 - Nov. 22, 1980
Clarkson, Theresa Born Oct. 17, 1928
Clarkson, Tobe Jan. 01, 1898 - April 22, 1956

Clarkson, Betty (see Marsh, Jeff & Sons)

Clary, Duke G.
In 1832 Carroll Parish was carved out of Ouachita Parish by the State Legislature. The 1st sheriff was Duke G. Clary. He died on Feb. 9, 1838, and Thomas Robeau Patton was elected. William W. Collins, the last sheriff before reconstruction days disrupted everything. "Between the Rivers", McKoin
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1832: Duke G. Clary. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Clary, Sam
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: Organized in 1914, the church located on Davis Streets. Sam Clary has served as one of the Sunday School Directors. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Clay, Jackworth
A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. All office were filled with colored people, Cain Sartain was senator, followed by Jackworth Clay.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Clelan, Thomas H.
CHURCHES; PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: In 1858 a Presbyterian minister, Thomas H. Clelan officiated “as an ordained Presbyterian minister“ at a marriage. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Clement in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Clement, Annie P. "Tommie" March 10, 1907 - May 15, 1977 MOTHER
Clement, Celeste H. March 24, 1932 - Oct. 12, 1951
Clement, Elizabeth B. May 31, 1889 - Oct. 30, 1977 DM W/Thomas I. Clement
Clement, Guy Cecil Aug. 20, 1908 - Dec. 29, 1958
Clement, Jack Davis Nov. 18, 1933 - March 12, 1957
Clement, James Lafay Oct. 21, 1924 - Dec. 28, 1980
Clement, Joe 02/04/1906 - 09/09/1997 C
Clement, Joe T. Born Feb. 04, 1906 DM W/Marie A. Clement
Clement, Marie A. Aug. 26, 1908 - Sept. 08, 1986 DM W/Joe T. Clement
Clement, Thomas F. Feb. 11, 1881 (^1895) - Jan. 9, 1946, DM W/Elizabeth B. Clement

Clement, Annie
Annie Clement is a daughter of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. Annie lives in Westminister, California. Annie was a navy nurse during WWII. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Elizabeth Florence

Clement, Gladys
Gladys is a daughter of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. Gladys lives in Hyattsville, Maryland. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Guy Cecil
Guy Cecil is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. He died in 1958 at 50 years old. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Jessie Louis
Jessie Louis is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. He lives in Transylvania, La. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Joe Thomas
Joe Thomas Clement is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. J. T. married Marie Anderson, a teacher in this parish for the past 36 years.. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, John Wesley
John Wesley Clement is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. J. W. was a WWII casualty in 1945. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Julia
Julia is a daughter of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. Julia married Mr. Ellis. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, LaFaye
LaFayette Clement is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. LaFaye lives in Lake Providence, La. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Lloyd LaBane
BIOGRAPHIES: Lloyd is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. Lloyd, after graduation from high school, began work with the Louisiana Power and Light Company. When this company divided, he went with La. Gas Service and has worked for this company for 26 years. He is married to the former Thelma Parsons, a teacher in E. C. since 1955. Lloyd has also been a member of the Volunteer Fire Dept. and Fire Chief; a member of Rotary Club, life membership in the Junior Chamber of Commerce, and has been a member of the E. C. Parish School Board since 1966, serving as vice-president for 4 years. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Marie (Anderson)
Married to Joe Thomas Clement. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Oeina
Oeina is a daughter of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. She lives in Eudora, AR. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, Ray
Ray is a son of T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement. He lives in Lake Providence, La. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Clement, T. I.
BIOS: They were the parents of 12 children. T. I. and Elizabeth Florence Clement moved from Crowville, La. to Madison Parish in 1929. They came to East Carroll Parish in the fall of 1933 to the Garden Home Community at Transylvania. Their children are: (listed is 11 of the twelve) (1) Joe Thomas Clement, (2) Guy Cecil Clement, (3) Jessie Louis Clement, (4) Gladys Clement, (5) Oeina Clement (6) Annie Clement (7) John Wesley Clement, (8) Lafayette Clement (9) Ray Clement, (10) Julia Clement (11) Lloyd LaBane Clement. Both Mr. & Mrs. T. I. Clement prior to 1971. In this large family, when this book “A Place to Remember”, came out there were 54 grandchildren, 58 great-grandchildren and seven great-great-grandchildren.. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

CLIPPERS;
1948 BASEBALL TEAM: The team always had the backing of the fans, when the team played they packed the stadium with spectators and well-wishers. Several times they even passed the hat for a spectacular play. Picture (left to right), Top row: (1) Billy Bonner, now deceased; 2nd baseman, (2)Henry Winest, now rural mail carrier at Transylvania; pitched, (3)Bones Parker, present whereabouts unknown; 1st baseman, (4) Tracey Weems, now with the Soil Conservation office in Tallulah; pitcher, (5) John House, now a member of the LA. State Police stationed at Lake Providence; 1st baseman and outfielder, (6) Ray Fortenberry, local farmer and salesman for Lowe Equipment Co. of Tallulah; shortstop, and (7) Paul Cook, now with the police department in Bastrop; pitcher. Botton row: (8) ??? Walters; now in real estate in Florida; team manager, (9) Ike Dumas, now living in Bastrop; catcher and outfield, (10) Darrell Foreman, now a teacher in Bastrop; catcher, (11) Sam House, East Carroll farmer; pitcher, (11) F. F. Fortenberry, AMOCO oil Distributor (also manages a team in the major league); outfielder, (12) Quinton Fortenberry, game warden with LA. Wildlife and Fisheries(also manages a team in the Dixie league); 1st baseman and outfielder, (13) Ernie Horne, with a Federal Compress in Arkansas; 3rd baseman, and, of course, the little fellow is (14) Johnny House, now grown and married [1965], son of Sam House. [some of these men are listed in these bios individually]

Coats, Bessie [see Walsworth, Bessie]

Coats, J. W.

Cobb in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cobb, Ida May Nov. 26, 1903 - June 18, 1987 CFH Records
Cobb, Sarah (see Neely, Sarah Cobb)

Cobb, Ida May
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Ida May is a secretary and then clerk of the Police Jury. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Cobb, W. M. (Doctor)
HEALTH UNIT: In 1917 Dr. W. M. Cobb was town health inspector. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Coburn in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Coburn, Walter B. Oct. 17, 1888 - Nov. 26, 1956 DADDY
Coburn, Willie E. April 22, 1895 - Jan. 25, 1974 MOTHER

Cochis, Sally
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Sally Cochis. “A Place to Remember”

Cochran, Elizabeth G. (Wyly)

Cochran, Harry
CLUBS; AMERICAN LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion was organized in 1920 with one of the Charter members being Harry Cochran. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Cochran, Thomas

Cofer in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cofer, Idell 1903 - 1923
Cofer, James R. Feb. 13, 1875 - Sept. 28, 1949
Cofer, Mary E. Jan. 11, 1878 - June 10, 1956 Wife

Coffield, Heratius Dancy (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1848: Dr. Heratius Dancy Coffield. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cohn, David

Cole in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cole, Myrtle (see Beard, Myrtle Cole)

Cole, Ira (Dr.)
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: “The church is located on Davis Streets. Recent pastors listed: George Nelson, a native who served as a Navy chaplain during WWII, Paul Elledge, C. A. Martin, Doug Cheatham, Dr. Ira Cole, Myron Stagg, and Paul Kolb.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cole, W. D. (also Cole, William D.),
Volume 1 C. page 379 “Pvt. Co. A. 13th Battalion La. (Partisan Rangers). En. July 11th, 1862, Hamburg. Captured at Lake Providence, La., Feb. 10th, 1863. Recd. at Gratiot St. Military Prison, St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 21st, 1863. Forward from St. Louis, [p.379] Mo., toward Allen's Point, Va., for exchange, April 2nd, 1863. Recd. at City Point, Va., April 9th, 1863. Exchanged May 5th, 1863.” Found on the Internet

Coleman in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Coleman, Elizabeth Blackburn 1851 - 1924
Coleman, Elmus House 05/30/1916 - 04/03/1964 MS. SGT 38 Depot Repair ~
SQ AAF WWII- DM/W Mina G. Coleman
Coleman, James Mr. Buried Oct. 14, 1969 - BFH - Negro - No Marker
Coleman, Julia (see Pittman, Julia Coleman)
Coleman, Mary O. Mrs. Buried June 07, 1971 - BFH - Negro - No Marker
Coleman, Mina Genevieve Gross Dec. 10, 1920 - March 16, 1984 ~
DM W/Elmus House Coleman

Coleman, Claude
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge # 222, on Feb. 1, 1957 dedicated the new 2-story building. C. T Hall was the Worshipful Master. Officers were Claude Coleman, H. G. Schneider, E. G. Mize, John W. Gilbert, and B. A. Bayle, Later Claude Coleman was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Coleman, Elmus
EARLY LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion, local Post Number 37, Powell-Martin-Barrett, was named for three heroes who gave their lives for their country in WWI, was organized in 1920. No records are available concerning the Past Commanders of this Post, but records do refer to Elmus Coleman as an early leader. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Elmus Coleman was one of the first Hospital Board members. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Coleman, Frank (Mrs.)
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: A masque or character portrayal party held at Oakland in the pre-Civil War days illustrated their gracious living. Mrs. Sellers, Hostess of the home, graciously invited her guests to “freely partake of the bountiful supper...” Mrs. Dr. Burwell was mistress of the parlor and dance room: Mrs. Frank Coleman was hostess of the supper room. Guests came dressed as Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Aaron Burr. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Coleman, Genevieve
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “business career, homemaker” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Coleman, James R.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. James R. Coleman was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Coleman, Lizzie F. (Blackburn)

Coleman, Lorena
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community. In May 1973, at the 50th Anniversary of the church - charter member Lorena Coleman was there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Coleman, Morris
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. Morris Coleman served as a Deacon in the church. Present (1976) pastor is Reverend Clyde Coulter. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Coleman, Frank (Mrs.)

Coleman, Sherry [see Nelson, Hyland Richard]

Colletta in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Colletta, Enrico Oct. 24, 1877 - Sept. 18, 1905 Born at Casteldaccia Italy ~ Date of Death written in Italian

Collier, Holt
Live Oaks Cemetery Mississippi Washington County, Greenville, Historically all African-American cemetery where former slave and bear hunt leader Holt Collier is buried. Public Spirituality; Cultural Diversity; history Onward Store, Smedes Plantation Historical marker at entrance of cemetery explains Collier's story. Holt Collier led the hunting expedition in which Teddy Roosevelt refused to shoot the bear, thus launching the creation of the teddy bear. Collier had trapped the bear for Roosevelt to shoot. From Internet Research

Collier, James

Collins in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Collins, Jarrett 1915 - 1959
Collins, R. W. Sept. 05, 1874 - Sept. 14, 1952 "Bert"

Collins, Charlie

Collins, D. H. (Mr. & Mrs.)
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. Two of the thirty-nine charter members was Mr. & Mrs. D. H. Collins. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Collins, John A.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1848: John A. Collins. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Collins, M. K.
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: The La. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church sent a minister named M. K. Collins in 1856. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Collins, Jarrett (Mrs.)
E. C. LIBRARY BOARD: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. The Police Jury appointed Mrs. Jarrett Collins on the 1st Library Board of Control. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Collins, Pauline

Collins, Thomas Jefferson

Collins, William W.
“The first settlement in East Carroll in the early 19th century was on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Lake Providence, which then called Stock/Stack Island Lake. James Floyd claimed a section of land between the river and the lake, alleging that he had settle upon it in 1803. William Culfield and William Collins each claimed a section of land on the lake, their tracts adjoining Floyd‘s claim. They also dated their occupancy from the year 1803.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
In 1832 Carroll Parish was carved out of Ouachita Parish by the State Legislature. Some of the 1st Sheriffs were Duke G. Clary, Thomas Roberdeau Patton, John D. Harding, Geo. W. Grant, James C. Drew, Edmund R. Travis, William L. S. D. Oliver, Alex G. Lane, and William W. Collins, the last sheriff before reconstruction days disrupted everything. "Between the Rivers", McKoin
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1867: W. W. Collins. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS: Carroll Record; The newspaper began publication in Floyd in 1866. The very first sale mentioned is dated June 27, 1866, when Sheriff William Collins sold the G. M. Langford property in Floyd. Records dated Nov. 30, 1867, show the Record moved to L.P. that year. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Collins, Willie
BLACK CHURCHES; EVENING STAR MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH NO.2: Established in 1935 on No Mistake Plantation, LA, Hwy 134. The people living on the plantation built the church with the permission of the owner M. Sam Mitchiner. One of the people involved in building the church was Willie Collins. The first pastor was Frank Davis, present pastor is Frank W. Wilson.[1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Collum, Minnie (Miss)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: The faculty of the L.P. school in 1907 - 1908 was 1st Assistant; Miss Lucie Nunn, 7th & 8th Grades; Miss Irma Williams, 5th & 6th grades; Miss Belle Briant, 3rd & 4th grades; Miss Eula Bean, Literature, Expression, & Physical Culture; Miss Nettie Brown, Music; Miss Minnie Collum. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Compton, J. N.

Conde in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Conde, Linda Louise June 03, 1949 - June 24, 1949 ~
Daughter of Percy & Mary Conde

Cone in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cone, Elizabeth Carol Dec. 25, 1941 - Jan. 02, 1942
Cone, Julia (see Frost, Julia Cone)

Cone, Ginger (Miss)
The Rainbow Girls Assembly, organized by the Order of Eastern Star in 1952 with 45 members. One of the young ladies that was a Worthy Advisor was Miss Ginger Cone. From "A Place to Remember ", Georgia Payne Pinkston

Cone, Mayor William B.
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: William Cone served as Mayor from 1954 to 1962. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cone, Peggy
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “manager of a chain of stores” (Ellis' 5 & 10)Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Conine, George W.
He was actively and successfully engaged in merchandising, carries a stock of goods invoicing about $3,000 in his store at Arkansas Post. He was the second son of a family of seven children born to Richard and Jane (Bean) Conine, natives of Georgia and Louisiana, respectively. The father was born about 1808, of Irish descent. Going to Louisiana when a young man, he was there married, about 1838, and made his home the rest of his life, and at his death, in 1850, was one of the well-to-do planters of that State. Owing to unjust management of the estate, his widow and children were thrown upon their daily labor for sustenance. His wife died in 1858. She was a daughter of Rev. Christopher Bean, an Englishman by birth, who passed away in Louisiana, in 1852. George W. Conine was born in Carroll Parish, La., in 1844. He began making his own way in the world at the early age of seven n days. Sleep thou in Jesus, little Hattie, till He bids thee arise. Mr. Conine continued farming until 1881, when he engaged in the mercantile business with his sister, Mrs. Mary A. Fogee, and since her death, in 1887, has continued the business himself, the firm being known as G. W. and B. B. Conine. He also owns about 1,000 acres of land in different tracts in this county, of which about 200 acres are under cultivation. He is a strong Democrat and a highly respected citizen. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church” Found on “The Computer Internet”
EMAIL: Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 23:23:47 EST Saconine@aol.com
“My ancesH TODAY (1977): “Negro home economics teacher” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
EDUCATION: In 1973 Mrs. Callie Conn retired from teaching. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Conn, Grandison
INTERNET: 1880 EAST CARROLL PARISH, LA CENSUS:
*Grandparents were Harry and Lucy Conn. They lived on the Airlie Plantation, located at Goodrich Landing, Carroll Parish, Louisiana. He was 78 (making him born around 1802) in Kentucky. His father and mother was born in Maryland. Lucy was 64 on the census (making her born around 1816). Lucy, her mother and father were all born in Virginia.*

Constant, Francis T.

Constant, Lucy (Barber)
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Lucy was the daughter of Susan Rebecca Sentell and Leonard Kellogg Barber. Lucy Barber married Frank T. Constant, of Neponsett Plantation. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Constant, Mary E. (Keene)
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Frank T. Constant‘s mother was Mary E. Keene Constant. His energetic mother had a steamboat named for her and she served as president of the Carroll Parish Cotton Company. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Cook in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cook, Joel Cecil Nov. 01, 1905 - June 03, 1966 DM W/J. C. Cook, Jr.
Cook, J. C., Jr. Sept. 01, 1932 - Sept. 21, 1950 LA PFC Cav. Div. Korea ~
DM W/Joel Cecil Cook
Cook, Phillip E. July 19, 1914 - May 19, 1959
Cook, Susie (see White, Susie Cook)
Cook, William Curtis "Bill" April 06, 1889 - Mar. 20, 1932

Cook, Annie L. (Miss)
L. P. BECOMES A HIGH SCHOOL; NOTES Nov. 1918: Schools were closed for 5 weeks due to the Spanish flu epidemic. Some of the teachers remained during the epidemic to nurse the sick and help the community. The School Board passed this Resolution: “RESOLVED, that this Board does hereby tender a vote of thanks to Misses Ola Johnston, Ethel Mitchell, Crichton D. Cox, Lucy L. White, Annie L. Cook and Ruth Maguire for remaining at their posts of duty during the influenza epidemic.“ “A Place to Remember”

Cook, William
"William C. Alsbrooks deeds to, by donation, School Directors-William Cook, Peter W. L. Longmire, William Carnahan, lot of land situated in N portion of the NE 1/4 of sec. 27, T23, NR10E; containing one acre on which the schoolhouse now stands." Date, February 27, 1862. "Between the Rivers", McKoin.

Cooke in L. P. Cemetery:
Cooke, Sally (see Williamson, Sally Cooke)

Cooke, H. Brent & Rachel (Wilson) [see Williamson, Norris C.]

Cooke, Sally (see Williamson, Norris Charlescraft)

Cooley, Thomas J.

Coolins, R. T. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1858: Dr. R. T. Coolins, Dr. J. S. Herring. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cooper in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cooper, Annie Turner 1879 - 1960
Cooper, C. W. "Bill" Nov. 03, 1899 - March 04, 1983 ~
Husband of Lillie Berry Cooper
Cooper, Clinton Poole 1915 - 1945 OUR SON ~
(C. W. & Lillie Berry Cooper are next to this Grave)
Cooper, Hattie Ruth July 27, 1876 - Dec. 12, 1909 Wife of J. T. Cooper
Cooper, Jesse Hardy Dec. 22, 1862 - Nov. 09, 1914
Cooper, Joel Crawford 02/11/1904 - 10/07/1904 Son of J. H. & H. R. Cooper
Cooper, Julia E. Murphy Sept. 02, 1889 - April 22, 1917 Wife of J. T. Cooper
Cooper, Lillie Berry Oct. 24, 1893 - March 12, 1958 Wife (C. W. Cooper)

Cooper, A.

Cooper, Cora Lee (see Ragland, William Betron)

Cooper, George W.
BLACK CHURCHES; JERUSALEM MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: Built in 1953 on land donated by George W. Cooper of Bunch’s Bend, purchased from Bill Hubbard for $400. It‘s cemetery is on the Wendell Downen‘s farm. 1st pastor is O. L. Virgil, resigning in 1958, succeeded by E. D. Handle, who remains as pastor in 1976. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Cooper, Jesse

Cooper, Ruth (Johnson Murphy)

Cooper, Wheeler

Copes, J. T.
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginningchards. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: W. C. Corbin re-enlisted after his one-year term had expired from his service with the Monticello Rifles from Ark. & MO. Corbin raised a company from Carroll and joined the 13th Battalian, with Frank Bartlett. These volunteers became Co. B., and stationed at Floyd.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: On May 10th, One column of Major Roberts union troops were marching along the Bayou Macon Road and ambushed by Captain Corbin near Lane’s Ferry. Union troops regrouped by the Confederate force refused to budge, and the disorderly, superior union troops retreated back to Lake Providence. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Cordiliac, Frank
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWI: Frank Cordiliac, Pvt., died of Pneumonia, Sept. 28, 1918.

Corley in L. P. Cemetery:
Corley, Bertha June 08, 1888 - died Dec. 20, 1919 Wife of S. J. Corley

Couch in L. P. Cemetery:
Couch, INFANTS (3) 1) April 06, 1956 2) Our Baby Son, Eddie Lydell Couch,
1955-1956 3) Infant Lalonde Couch April 21, 1963
Coulter, Clyde (Rev)
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Couvillion, H. H. (Rev.)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: In 1947 Father L. R. Aycock was followed by Rev. H. H. Couvillion. In 1947 Rev. Joseph E. Gremillion came and completed the school. The dedication of the school was held in 1947 with the service conducted by His Excellency Charles P. Greco, Bishop of Alexdandria. Gremillion was reassigned in 1949, and Monsignor F. J. Plutz returned in March. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Cox in L. P. Cemetery:
Cox, Anna 10/09/1997 C
Cox, Frances (see Crump, Frances Cox)
Cox, Henry C. 1899 - 1934
Cox, INFANT Jan. 22, 1904 - March 13, 1904 ~
Infant Daughter of R. L. & Allie E. Cox

Cox, Anna (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; FIRST CHRISTIAN OF L. P.: Twenty people met in the home of Mr. & Mrs. Leroy Kennedy on February 19, 1967 with Reverend Vernon Newland to organize a church. The church was meeting in the Bank of Dixie and in an apartment belonging to Mrs. Anna Cox. A church was dedicated on June 2, 1974 on Reginold Street. Reverend Ronnie Hoyer is pastor. [1977] . “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Cox, Crichton D.
L. P. BECOMES A HIGH SCHOOL; NOTES Nov. 1918: Schools were closed for 5 weeks due to the Spanish flu epidemic. Some of the teachers remained during the epidemic to nurse the sick and help the community. The School Board passed this Resolution: “RESOLVED, that this Board does hereby tender a vote of thanks to Misses Ola Johnston, Ethel Mitchell, Crichton D. Cox, Lucy L. White, Annie L. Cook and Ruth Maguire for remaining at their posts of duty during the influenza epidemic.“ “A Place to Remember”

Cox, Inez (Miss)
TEACHERS: Listed as one of the parish wide teachers in 1926 was Miss Inez Cox, piano and violin. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Cox, Vernon (Mrs.)
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. Vernon Cox“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Crabtree in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Crabtree, Alta (see McKee, Alta Crabtree)

Crain / Crane in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Crain, B. A. Jan. 27, 1872 - Sept. 11, 1905
Crane, Virginia (see Grimes, Virginia S. Crane)

Craig, Norma [see Craig, Norman]
Norma is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Norman Craig. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Craig, Norman
BIOS: Norman Craig is of Scotch ancestry. Norman is engaged in towing vessels on the MS. River. He is founder of Carroll Towing Company. Various co-owners have sold their holdings to Mr. Craig, he and his son, Paul Craig, have owned 4 large vessels, ranging from 1800 to 3900 HP. Norman is of Scotch ancestry. He came from Cincinnati to Oak Grove in West Carroll Parish in 1944 and then to L. P. in 1960. Mr. & Mrs. Craig live at Craig‘s Landing on the lake on Island Point. They are members of the First Presbyterian Church of which he is an elder. Their children and Norma and Paul. Paul is married to Patricia Wagley. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Craig, Paul [see Craig, Norman]
Paul is the son on Mr. & Mrs. Norman Craig. He is married to Patricia Wagley. He and his father own four large towing vessels. Paul and his wife live in Oak Grove, LA. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cravens, N. A.
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: The La. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church sent a minister named N. A. Cravens in 1857. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Creech in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Creech, Ida V. (see Anderson, Ida V. Creech)

Creth in L. P. Cemetery:
Creth, Alberta (see Jones, Alberta Creth)

Crews, James H. (Mrs.)
CLUBS; L. P. JUNIOR AUXILIARY: “The L. P. Junior Auxiliary was organized in Sept. 1962. Serving as a president was Mrs. James H. Crews. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Crigler in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Crigler, James Died April 04, 1976 INFANT

Crigler, James [this could be Jr.]
LAW: W. B. Ragland, Jr., Charles Brackin and James Crigler work at Frank Voelker‘s law firm. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Crigler, James Jr.
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1945: Mr. McIntosh. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Criston in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Criston, Missouri 1887 - 1970

Crosby, Marie (Miss)
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: Listed as one of the 1921 teachers is Miss Marie Crosby. “A Place to Remember”

Crosby, T. J.
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastors of the church was T. J. Crosby. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Crow, J. M.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was J. M. Crow. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Crow, M. J.
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. M. J. Crow also served as a pastor there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Crump in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Crump, Arthur Stewart 07/02/1891 - 12/28/1958 LA. CPL 4 Casual Co. WWI
Crump, Frances Cox May 16, 1894 - Sept. 18, 1965

Crump, Arthur
EDUCATION: In 1946 Arthur Crump was on the School Board. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.
EARLY LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion, local Post Number 37, Powell-Martin-Barrett, was named for three heroes who gave their lives for their country in WWI, was organized in 1920. No records are available concerning the Past Commanders of this Post, but records do refer to Arthur Crump as an early leader. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Crump, Arthur S. (Mrs.)
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. Arthur S. Crump. One of the Regents of Moses Shelby Chapter since Mrs. McDaniel has been Mrs. Arthur Crump.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Crump, Kenny (Dr.) [see Edmondson, Shirley]

Crymes, Elizabeth (Miss)
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: Listed as one of the 1921 teachers is Miss Elizabeth Crymes. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Culfield, William
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “The first settlement in East Carroll in the early 19th century was on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Lake Providence, which then called Stock/Stack Island Lake. James Floyd claimed a section of land between the river and the lake, alleging that he had settle upon it in 1803. William Culfield and William Collins each claimed a section of land on the lake, their tracts adjoining Floyd‘s claim. They also dated their occupancy from the year 1803. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Culter in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Culter, Agnes (see Cromwell, Agnes Culter)
Culter, Gracie Mae Aug. 10, 1886 - April 08, 1963 (dbl. - No Name)
Culter, Marjorie April 29, 1912 - July 01, 1974
Culter, Mildred Annabelle Dec. 18, 1916 - Feb. 06, 1989
Culter, Vernon Dec. 27, 1926 - June 19, 1955 LA. S2 - USNR - WW II

Culter, J. R.
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Cummings in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Cummings, Fred E. Nov. 07, 1913 - Feb. 26, 1949
Cummings, George W. (dbl./Pearl Cummings) 1889 - 1859
Cummings, Katie E. Sept. 09, 1919 - June 16, 1980
Cummings, Mark Anthony 1967 - March 23, 1985
Cummings, Pearl D. (dbl./George W. Cummings) 1894 - 1953
Cummings, Ray G. 1918 - March 23, 1985
Cummings, Wesley Dewitt 01/11/1998 - 01/15/1998 C
Cummings, Wesley D. Born Feb. 18, 1915 DM W/Katie E. Cummings

Currie / Curry in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Currie, Leila Ada (see Riley, Leila Ada)

Currie, Abram Whitaker "A. W."
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1860: A. W. Currie. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Currie, C. George (Rev)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence and established the first services of the Episcopal Church. Bishop James Hervey Otey visited the mission twice in 1847. In 1857 the Rev. C. George Currie was the pastor of the church. There was no minister for the next ten years. [1977] . “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Curry, Mrs. Abe
“Miss Kate Stone (writer of “Brokenburn” her diary) mentions Mrs. Elizabeth Savage going to Floyd frequently in 1862. I assumed the Savage Plantation was nearer the Macon River than most of the others. She said, ‘Mrs. Hardison was telling us of Mrs. Abe Curry’s trip on horseback to Floyd. She must be crazy.’ A footnote said this was fifty miles round trip and mentioned Floyd being the county seat of Carroll Parish. There were federal troops in this area trying to stir up trouble among the slaves which was the reason Miss Stone thought Mrs. Curry’s trip hazardous.”
“In another section Miss Stone says, ‘A letter today from Mrs. Hardison. They and the Currys expect to move into the neighborhood in a few days. She writes gloomily of affairs on the river. The Newmans and the Grays are the only families left out there. Matt Johnson, after being beaten by his negroes, has come out to Floyd with fifteen other men and trying to raise a company to drive out the marauding Yankees. If only those backwoodsmen from across the Macon River would come over and help us.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Curry, Elizabeth (see Beard, Mrs. Isham B.)

Curry, George M., M.D.,
George was a native of Dearborn County, Ind.. He was born April 3,1818. His parents were Elias and Lydia (Abraham) Curry. Elias Curry, a native of Pittsburgh, Pa., resided in Kentucky awhile, then moved to Indiana. He is a founder by trade, and is still living at Dillsborough, Ind. He is a son of James Curry, a native of Wales. Mrs. Lydia Curry was born in Cleveland, Ohio, a daughter of George Abraham, a native of England.
George M. Curry was reared in Aurora and Dillsborough, Ind., and educated at Moore's Hill Male and Female Institute and at Holbrook's Normal School, Lebanon, O., graduating from the former in 1867. He attended two full courses of medical lectures at the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, O., where he graduated with high honor in 1871. In 1872 he located at Owingsville, Ky., and practiced his profession until the fall of 1884, when he was engaged as assistant of Prof. W.W. Dawson, of the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati. He served in that capacity about nine months, when he returned to Owingsville, where he has since resided, making a specialty of surgery, having thoroughly equipped himself with all necessary instruments while in Cincinnati. May 30, 1872, the Doctor married Miss Lou A. Tichenor, of Lebanon, O., a daughter of David and Eliza (Williams) Tichenor. They are the parents of five children, three of whom still survive, viz: Clifford T., Nina and Edna P. Dr. and Mrs. Curry are members of the Presbyterian Church, as is also Clifford T. Dr. Curry is a Republican politically; he is an able physician and a gentleman who is highly respected by all who know him.
CURRY ABRAHAM DAWSON TICHENOR WILLIAMS
Dearborn-IN PA Wales OH Kentucky: A History of the State, Battle, Perrin, & Kniffin, ed. 8-B, 1887 Bath County, KY
“I am hoping there is an obituary for William Cromartie Currie, b. 17 June, 1810, died 2 October, 1876. He lived in Carroll Parish from about 1847 until his death, as far as I know, and is buried in Vicksburg along with lots of other Curries. William was a wealthy planter so I have always felt sure he would have had a write-up.
CURRIE, ALEXANDER, RICHARDS, WHITAKER, CROMARTY
P. S. by the way, on the Monticello Rifles roster you have Abe listed as "A.W. Cume." Leta
For now I will tell you that I am most interested in finding out William Cromartie Currie's parents' names; family letters say his parents were Catherine Cromartie and William Currie, from Scotland (Edinburgh area) but I haven't been able to confirm this yet. I also would like to know what happened to Adeline Whitaker Currie, William's first wife; I think perhaps they lived in Madison City, MS where their surviving children were born and she died there leaving Abe, between 10 and 12, and Huldah, between birth and 2 yrs old. Lots more to research here when I have time. Anyway, after that William Currie moved to Louisiana and married Hester Ann Richards and lived in Carroll. Other than tracking down living descendants I pretty much know what happened after that, it's further back that's giving me trouble.

1870 Census of Carroll Parish, Craig & Stone Plantations
#1812
Richards, George m. 25, planter LA $5,000. $1,000.
#1813
Curry, W.C. m. 50, MS $8,000. $1,000.
, Ann f. 40 MS
, Howard m. 21, planter LA
, Haldar f. 20, LA
, Kate f. 15, LA
, Lela f. 12, LA
, Ann f. 8, LA

1880 Census of Carroll Parish
#505
Richard(s)?, A., w. m. 29, carpenter LA, Switzerland, Germany
, Maggie, w. f. 22, wife Scot. Switz. Germ.
, Albert F. w. m. 4, son LA LA Scot.
, Lousia w. f. 2, dau. LA LA Scot.
No Curry/Curries

1890 of Carroll Parish - No Richards - No Curry/Curries

William was a rich planter, at least before the war, so I figured his obituary would be in the papers. William Cromarty Currie's parents were Alexander Currie and Loruhamah Cromartie, don't know when they died but Alexander still shows up as late as the 1840 Warren County census (spelled Curry, as it often was then).

Curry, Thomas
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1842; 9th District: Thomas Curry. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Cushman,H. B.

Custer, A. B.
NEWSPAPERS; The Banner-Democrat was owned by Owen S. Brown. His linotype operator was A. B. Custer, who has been in this business for 43 years and is also business manager. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

D’Aubert, Skardon
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. An even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. During the span of fifty years (1926 to 1976) one of the clergymen was Skardon D‘Aubert. The present rector is Charles M. Seymour, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Dacus family
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA CHURCH OF CHRIST: The 1st church of this denomination was a government project which was organized in Transylvania, with the Stanley, Dacus, and George families meeting in their homes. They later used the former Melbourne Baptist church building. During WWII a church was built south of Transylvania. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Dacus, George
EDUCATION: In 1946 George Dacus was on the School Board. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Daggett, Henry T.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1835: Henry T. Daggett. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Dalfiume in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dalfiume, Alfonso 1876 - 1956
Dalfiume, Concetta Carbo Sept. 22, 1891 - Aug. 14, 1985
Dalfiume, Henry, Jr. 08/19/1995 - 08/24/1995 C
Dalfiume, Henry R. 1915 - 1965
Dalfiume, Josephine 1878 - 1918
Dalfiume, Lutcher Francis Aug. 12, 1907 - May 26, 1977

Dalfiume, Diane [see Howard, John Robert]

Dalfiume, Henry
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: During 1929, President of the Women’s Auxiliary, Mrs. W. H. Hamley (President of the Unit) awarded a medal to Henry Dalfiume for his school essay. “ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Henry Dalfiume, Inside Guard. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic projects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Daniel, L. I.
THE CARROLL TELEGRAPH: On Christmas Day, 1862, William T. Sherman sent 30,000 troops to Milliken’s Bend. The naval convoy had stolen past Providence the night before and would have reached Vicksburg undetected, had it not been for an alert telegrapher, L. I. Daniel, stationed at Point Lookout 11 miles south of Lake Providence on a private telegraph line owned by Horace B. Tibbetts. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. [*NOTE: I found elsewhere where it says the name was Lee S. Daniel]

Daniels in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Daniels, Almedia (see White, Almedia Daniels)

Dannon, Andrew
“A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “In 1878, PARISH OFFICIALS FOR West Carroll were first elected. These were Senator; C. Newton, State Rep.; Dr. J. S. Herring, Sheriff; P. M. Gaddis, Clerk Of Court; A. L. Allen, Assessor; Andrew Dannon, Tax Collector; T. M. Gaddis, and Judge; E. D. Hannigan.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Dantoni in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dantoni, Rosa (dbl./Salvastor) Feb. 15, 1850 - Dec. 12, 1921 ~ DM W/Salvatori Dantoni

Danton in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Danton, Salvastor (dbl./Rosa) May 15, 1850 - Mar. 17, 1940 ~ DM W/Rosa Dantoni

Darden, Archie
BLACK CHURCHES; KING SOLOMON BAPTIST CHURCH: It was organized in 1911 near Shelburn, later moving to Carrollton Plantation on LA. Hwy 65 north of town belonging to Mr. Keener Howard. First pastor was Stephen Gray, succeeded by Archie Darden. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Darden, Nellie (Mrs. Luther)
BLACK CHURCHES; PLEASANT GREEN BAPTIST is located on Waverly Plantation owned by Mr. William Wyly. From 1937 to 1976, there have been two pastors: Luke Virgil, Sr.. and Mrs. Luther (Nellie) Darden. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Dash, Marsh
BLACK CHURCHES; CENTRAL BAPTIST NO. 2: Organized in 1935 and located at the corner of Artaud and First Streets, under the leadership of L. L. Virgil. One of the trustees at the time of organization was Marsh Dash. The 1st pastor was Alex Strong, a Civil War veteran. A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Dashiell, I. Y. (Coronor)
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1843-1844: Dr. I. Y. Dashiell, Coronor, L. F. Dashiell lived in a frame house on Lot 9 fronting on the Mississippi River & Railroad Street. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Davenport, C. C.
Mr. Davenport wrote his memoirs in 1910 for the "Mer Rouge Democrat", and now these articles have been put in booklet form "Looking Backward", and can be found in the Morehouse Parish Library.

Davenport, Isaiah
“The Baron de Bastrop had promised as a part of his agreement when the king of Spain awarded him the two million acre land grant which included the present area of Morehouse and West Carroll Parishes, to bring in 500 settlers in an effort to colonize the area. He found himself slow in fulfilplies and protection. For supplies and protection.
Fortunately, protection from the Indians was never needed. The few Indians here were friendly and helpful to the settlers, teaching them what they knew of boat making, planting, and raising crops acclimated to the area; brought a few slaves with them, but the masters worked along side the slaves in erecting crude homes, clearing and cultivating the land with what tools they had, always sharing with each other. In this way they eked out a simple livelihood in the early years.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Davenport, W. W.
CHURCHES; ASSEMBLY OF GOD: “Located on the corner of 4th & Hamley Streets, the 1st Assembly of God Church was founded on Oct. 20, 1950. Pastors in early years were Reverends W. W. Davenport, G. D. Wilson, Paul J. Young, L. O. Lormand, and Steve Grizzle. Present pastor is L. V. Dixon [1977].” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Davidson, Hershel
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Hershel Davidson was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Davidson, Ray
COMMUNICATION; RADIO: The local station, call letters KLPL, was established in 1957. The first owner was Emmett McMurray, and the 1st manager was Gene Underwood, now with a Vicksburg station. The present manager (1975) is Norm Davis and the owner is Ben Ennis of Lexington, TN. There is a staff of six some of the regular members are Norm Davis, Pam Ford, Ray Davidson, A. L. Thomas, and Randy Lovell. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Davie in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Davie, Florence Blanton Sept. __, 1927 Wife of L. L. Davie
Davie, L. L. Sept. 06, 1851

Davis in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Davis, Charles Elliot Aug. 08, 1873 - Dec. 17, 1949
Davis, Clifton Felix Dec. 13, 1868 - Oct. 17, 1952 Husband & DM W/ ~
Mary Walton Montgomery -
Son of James L. Davis & Sarah Roxana Eppes -
Born @ Roeders Mill, Austin Co., TX., Died Shreveport, La.
Davis, Katie (see Ransdell, Katie Davis)
Davis, Mary Ann (see Witkowski, Mary Ann Davis)
Davis, Mary Walton Montgomery Dec. 19, 1873 - Dec. 12, 1977 ~
Wife & DM W/Clifton Felix Davis -born L. P., La.
Died Shreveport, La.
Daughter of Field F. & Ella A. Hunt Montgomery
Davis, Sarah Roxanne (nee Eppes) 08/08/1838 - 08/26/1891 Wife of James L. Davis
Davis, Thomas Blackburn May 20, 1871 - May 31, 1937
Davis, Willie Gilliam Sept. 13, 1865 - Dec. 23, 1906 Daughter of Irwin Davis

Davis, Aquilla
Father of James Lewis Davis. He was a merchant early in life and a teacher in later years. He was finely educated, possessing decided literary tastes, and literary people were delightfully at home with this most genial gentleman. He was married to Esther Vance Wysong. He was a very active Whig. He was of English descent, his grandfather Davis having come from England, although originally from Wales. He was of the same family as Jefferson Davis.

Davis, Charlie
TRANSPORTAION; AIRPORTS: Lake Providence Flying Service had an office and hangar located 2 miles south of town. Charlie Davis, Buzzie Tomlinson and George Shepherd had a hangar at the L. P. Flying Service. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
TRANSPORTAION; AIRPORTS: Charlie Davis has a flying service on the north side, at the ‘head’ of the lake. In 1975 there were 30 privately owned planes housed at this airport. Charlie was killed in a plane crash in the late 1970’ or early 1980’s. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Davis, Clifton F.
STREETS AND ADDITIONS: “Davis Street was named for C. F. Davis, who inherited land in Providence in 1897 from his father, James L. Davis. Out of the land he formed the Davis Addition to the town.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1892 & 1898: Clifton F. Davis. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1900 (Feb); 7th District: Clifton F. Davis. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Davis, Donald F.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for 1943 - 44 was Donald F. Davis. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Davis, Donovan F. (Doctor)
Born in Lumberton, Mississippi, and graduating from the University of Mississippi. He attended the Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago, graduating in 1929. He married Marie Jennings of Chicago. Practicing medicine first in Tensas Parish, he came to East Carroll in 1940. He and his brother, Dr. J. P. Davis, shared an office in Lake Providence until J. P. opened an office at Transylvania, La.. Dr. Donovan and Mrs. Davis have two daughters, Donna (Mrs. B. Trosclair) and Elizabeth (Mrs. Lonnie Batton). There are five grandchildren.
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was on North Hood Street, land donated by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. One of the doctors on the first medical staff was Dr. D. F. Davis. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS; RECENT [Info in book is from 1977]: A recent physician is Dr. Donovan F. Davis . George Wright Dr. F. A. Cain Dr. W. A. Harris Dr. W. A. Paris Dr. Forrest M. Terral, Two dentists: Dr. R. D. Graham and Dr. Thomas O‘Sullivan. One Optometrist: Dr. Sheldon Anderson, succeeding Dr. Carl A. Kelly. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
{see also his brother J. P. Davis}

Davis, Edward High & Julia (Blackburn)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Elected as vestry on July 27, 1873 was David L. Morgan and John Seay, Wardens. One of the first Vestry was E. H. Davis. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BIOGRAPHIES: “Anna Mary (Nan) Davis was born on Tyrone Plantation, lived on Island Plantation and after her mother’s death was reared by her sister Catherine (Katie) Davis. She went to Jessamine Female Institute in Nicholson, KY, then returned to keep house for her father on Belle Meade Plantation.
In 1899, while the Davises were living on Star Arlington Plantation, she and Frederick Hall Schneider were married. They took a honeymoon trip on the steamboat Bell of the Bends. Anna Mary (Nan) Davis was a descendent of Devotion Davis, Sr., a delegate from Pasquotank County to the colonial North Carolina Congress, became an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution.“ From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
PLANTATIONS; BELL MEADE: “Property of Edward H. Davis.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; HOME PLACE: Home Place was owned by Govy Hood and later Edward H. Davis. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Davis, Elizabeth (Miss)
The Rainbow Girls Assembly, organized by the Order of Eastern Star in 1952 with 45 members. One of the young ladies that was a Worthy Advisor was Miss Elizabeth Davis. From "A Place to Remember ", Georgia Payne Pinkston

Davis, Elmer
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Davis, Frank
BLACK CHURCHES; EVENING STAR MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH NO.2: Established in 1935 on No Mistake Plantation, LA, Hwy 134. The people living on the plantation built the church with the permission of the owner M. Sam Mitchiner. The first pastor was Frank Davis, and present pastor is Frank W. Wilson. [1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Davis, Frederick
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1838; 9th District: Frederick Davis. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Davis, Flournoy
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. Flournoy Davis was one of the 16 knigtive county. Leaving at the age of 21 years old, in 1852, going to Missouri reading medicine, and in 1856 graduated in medicine from the St. Louis Medical College, practicing his profession near St. Joseph, Mo. for some time, leaving there in 1859 when he went to Louisiana and locating in Tensas Parish until the war broke out. He enlisted in 1861 in the Confederacy as a surgeon and was assigned to duty in Vicksburg and Clinton, MS. He became medical purveyor of northern Louisiana, and sometime later over the entire state west of the Mississippi River, headquarters in Alexandria, LA. He was a fine specimen of physical manhood, being 6' 3" in height. He was very popular, honorable, had a most amiable disposition, courteous, and had a wide circle of friends. In 1862 he married Miss S. Roxana Eppes, a daughter of John W. Eppes. He was a model husband and father. They had six children born: Eppes, Helen, Clifton F., Ella Shirley, Annie Laura, and Eva Knott. In 1864, due to health problems, he went to Texas, and in 1870, his health almost completely restored returned to East Carroll Parish, LA., resuming his medical practice at L. P.. He was well versed in medical lore, and his is an honored member of that fraternity, and is one of the most useful members of his profession. James and Roxanna were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church south.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
FIRE DEPARTMENT: Fire Company No. 1 was legally incorporated on June 4, 1874. It was decided that was to relocate and in January 1881 Dr. James L. Davis and Nicholas D. Ingram donated a lot on Lake Street to the fire company.
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: In 1880 Jason Hamilton was made Commissioner of Quarantine, assisted by John Spinette. In Sept. the Yellow Fever Board consisted of Dr. W. E. Long, Dr. J. L. Davis, and “members Franklin and Sutton from the Town Board”.
A diphtheria epidemic broke out in 1902, the town was divided into 5 sections, with Dr. Davis in charge of one of the sections. Cholera was also a problem the same year. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1862: Dr. James Lewis Davis, a native of Virginia. He became medical purveyour of the state. 1873: Year of the Cholera: Dr. J. L. Davis, residence on Front Street with office on Lake Street. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Davis, J. Preston (Doctor)
EAST CARROLL DELTA NEWS: March 11, 1965; PERSONALITY OF THE WEEK;
John P. Davis was born in south Miss., near Lumberton. He was the 5th child born to Elizabeth Lott and Lewis Porter Davis. John was 12 years old when his father died leaving his mother widowed with 8 children. John Preston attended the Agricultural High School, now known as Pearl River College. He was president of the Y. M. C. A. and president of his class. His brother (Dr.) Russell Davis and John were roommates for two years graduating from Ole Miss with a BS degree and 2 yr. medical certificate and a 2 year medical certificate he chose Northwestern University of Chicago, where he received his M.D. degree, where he worked part time-time in a laundry to defray expenses. He also worked as a carpenter, saw mill man and did some summer work on a ranch.
Dr. Davis said that the best thing that ever came his way was while serving at Charity Hospital in New Orleans he met Miss Evelyn Chamberlain of Adel, Iowa. He said she was the fairest of all with deep blue eyes and brown hair and the best nurse of all, as well as the best dancer with a fast Yankee step. She was the youngest of 3 sisters the other two now living in California.
John and Evelyn were married at his brother, Dr. Luther Davis, of Memphis, Tennessee on May 1, 1924. They had three children, Donovan Preston, born in Natchez, MS., in 1925, who died in 1928 of pneumonia. Evelyn Laverne born in Waterproof in 1929, and Dr. John Russell Davis born in 1935 at L. P., La. Laverne is now a music teacher in Los Angeles . Dr. John Russell Davis in now specializing in anesthesiology in Charity Hospital in New Orleans after receiving his M. D. degree from L. S. U. John Russell has two children.
Dr. Davis moved to Waterproof where he was employed as mill doctor for Chicago Mill and Lumber Company and also did general practice. He remained there seven years and then moved to L.P. in 1932. He has been very active in L. P. and Transylvania and for the past 4 years has maintained an office in Tallulah, LA. in the afternoon. In 1940 he and his brother was in partnership until 1952, when Dr. Davis was severely injured in an automobile accident which limited his practice and he spent more time with his farming interests and less time in his medical interests.
He served as Chairman of the Board of Stewards of the Methodist Church several times and still holds an honorary membership at the present time. He helped organize the Tri-Parish Medical Association and served as president one term. He was also a member of State, 5th District, Southern and AMA Medical Association. He is a Mason, Royal Arch Mason, Knight Templar and Shriner. He is also a Rotarian, member of the Phi Clu Medical fraternity and of the American Legion having been in the student Army training Corps in college.
Dr. Davis owns two plantations totaling 18,000 acres and he says the secret of successful debt free farming is ‘One has enough to rent them to folks having great farming ability.” And that is just what Dr. Preston Davis has done.
THE DOCTORS DAVIS 1931-1967: Born in Lumberton, Mississippi, and graduating from the University of Mississippi and then he attended the Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago. He interned at Hahmaman Hospital in Chicago and at Charity Hospital in New Orleans. Before coming to E. C. he practiced medicine in Brickeye, Arkansas and at Waterproof, La. He married Miss Evelyn Chamberlain of Adel, Iowa in 1924. They had three children: Donovan Preston Davis, who died at age three; John Russell, and Evelyn Laverne. Laverne is a teacher and John Russell is a doctor.
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was on North Hood Street on land donated by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. One of the doctors on the first medical staff was Dr. J. P. Davis. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. {see also his brother Donovan F. Davis}

Davis, John Russell (Doctor)
OTHER PHYSICIANS: Another physician who was reared in this parish but practices elsewhere was Dr. John Russel. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Davis, Marie (Jennings) also (Mrs. D. F.)
THE DOCTORS DAVIS 1931-1967: “Mrs. Donovan F. Davis was a registered nurse. After coming to L. P. she completed her bachelor’s degree at Northeast University and taught in the parish school s are Norm Davis, Pam Ford, Ray Davidson, A. L. Thomas, and Randy Lovell. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Davis, S. Roxana (Eppes)
She was a native of Mississippi and a daughter of John W. Eppes, a planter. Her grandfather Eppes was a native of the vicinity of Monticello, VA., and was connected to the Eppes-Jefferson family. She married Doctor James Lewis Davis in 1862.
OBITUARY: newspaper
“One of the saddest occurrences that has taken place in our little town in many a day was the death of Mrs. Roxana Eppes Davis. This good lady passed away Monday, August 27, 1891, surrounded by her sorrowful children and almost brokenhearted husband. She had been sick only a few days, and Dr. Davis apprehended no danger until Monday morn, when her symptoms grew alarmingly worse. Her death was that of a Christian, she met death bravely and was conscious to the last. A congestive chill was the immediate cause of her death. Mrs. Davis was a Miss Eppes, and was a native of Mississippi. Her father, John Wailles Eppes, was a planter for many years in old Carroll Parish, living near Monticello. She came to Louisiana at the early age of nine years, and five or six years afterwards went to Kentucky, where she was educated. In 1862 she was married to Dr. J. L. Davis at her father’s residence near Monticello. With a few exceptions, the Doctor has been living here ever since, engaged in the medical profession. Mrs. Davis leaves behind two sisters, Mrs. Ben Brown, of this place; and Mrs. Ed Brown, who is now in Florida. She was a woman of the most truthful and religious character; and during her whole life, she was never known to tell a falsehood. She was a loving and affectionate mother, and a devoted wife of the noblest type. Her remains were taken to the Methodist Church and from thence to the Providence Cemetery, followed by sorrowing friends and relatives. “ L. P. newspaper

Davis, Silas W.
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN: Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: Silas W. Davis gave a land donation for a graveyard. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember

Davis, Thomas V.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was Thomas V. Davis in 1845. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Davis, W. H.
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. W. H. Davis was one of the 16 knights that marched up to the grand stand.”…. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’ stand. W. H. Davis’ total, as rendered by the Judges, was 4 rings. His nickname was listed as “Knight of Belle Meade”. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Davis, William (Mrs.)
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. William Davis. “ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Davisson, Harriett (see Kerr, Joseph & Nancy)

Dawdy in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dawdy, Correnne Landram Oct. 04, 1914 - Jan. 23, 1972

Deal in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Deal, Baxter Oliver Feb. 28, 1911 - Jan. 17, 1967
Deal, Harry J. Sept. 01, 1917 - April 03, 1945 "Captain"

Deal, Baxter O.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for the 1963 - 1964 term was Baxter O. Deal. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Deal, Ruby (Magee)
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Ruby Magee Deal. “A Place to Remember”

Deal, W. B. (Mrs.)
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: One of the Gold Star Mothers honored in 1952 by the Women’s Auxiliary, Unit #37, was Mrs. W. B. Deal. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dean in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dean, Emmett F. May 13, 1877 - Mar. 1, 1919

Debro, Beatrice
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Negro leader in church activities and employee of school board.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place used by the Kirkwood Armory Hall Association. While on the way from Kirkwood to Clayton he complained of weakness and chilly sensations. He arrived in Clayton about 10 o’clock, and a few minutes later started up to the Circuit Court room, which is on the second floor of the Court House. When about half up the stairway he appeared to be stricken with paralysis, and he avoided falling by holding to the side railing on the steps. Colonel Mitchel, who was with him assisted him into Prosecuting Attorney Mudd’s office and onto a sofa. Dr. Van Ness of Kirkwood and Dr. E. S. Rouse of Clayton were near and were promptly called to attend him, and they did all to their power to give him relief, but to no avail. He was in great agony until 12:30, when death relieved him. The attending physicians assigned him cerebral hemorrhage as the cause of death. Dr. J. W. Evans, his son-in-law with whom he lived in Kirkwood, was summoned to Clayton from his place of business with the Evans Bros. Tobacco & Warehouse Company in St. Louis, and he arrived about 12 o’clock. The old gentleman spoke only one sentence after he was stricken on the stairway, and this was about one hour before he died when he looked at Dr. Evans, his son-in-law, and said: “My daughter!” In the afternoon the remains were taken by a wagon from Clayton to the home of his only daughter, wife ite, and had a heart as tender as a woman’s. He never was Judge in Mississippi, but was Judge of the parish of East Carroll, La. For several years, and filled the position creditable to himself, and wish satisfaction to the people.
He left many friends here. Those of them who survive will be sadly grieve to hear of his death.” BANNER-DEMOCRAT of East Carroll Parish, La.

Deeson, William M.
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN: Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: Mazeppa Stables was owned by Mathew and Deeson, with all horses, buggies, fixtures, lot and stable. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember
PLANTATIONS; DEESONA: “Formerly Holly Grove Plantation. Tom F. Montgomery deeded it to John Wesley Montgomery. Later it was the residence of the late William M. Deeson.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; PECAN GROVE: “ William M. Deeson sold this land in 1874 to William Jr. & Ann Adelia Waller, Jr.. A half interest was sold to Joseph H. D. Bowmar.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

DeFrance, Charles A.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1851, 1854, & 1873: Charles A. DeFrance. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PARISH JUDGE: 1871: Charles A. DeFrance. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
THE NEW TOWN: “On Feb. 19, 1866, a delegation of the leading citizens of Providence met in Judge DeFrance’s office for the purpose of relocating the destroyed town. Included in the delegation were Govy Hood, Thomas Scarborough, and W. F. Pennington. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

DeFrance, P. W.
CLERK OF COURT; 1859: P. W. DeFrance, 10th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Delanley, John W.
PLANTATIONS: James E. Old tells of his arrival in 1824: “… William Hinson, Joseph Fugua, William Fife, John Hughes and John W. Delanley lived at different places on the lake.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Delauney, J. A.
NEWSPAPERS; The Carroll Conservative, 1877: This newspaper appeared on the local scene in 1877 and was edited by D. L. Morgan. It was the first journal for the newly formed parish of East Carroll. It closed in 1879 at the time J. A. Delauney was the publisher.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

DeLee, Kathy
FEDERAL PROGRAMS; FAMILY PLANNING CENTER was established in 1970, headed by Bob Underwood. Louanna Facen, registered nurse, is in charge, assisted by Kathy DeLee, R. N., and Daisy Larry, clerk. A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Delony in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Delony, Alice Stephens No Dates
Delony, E. J. No Dates [born in Talbot Co. Ga, July 10, 1836,
Died @ Sept. 4, 1892; newspaper]
Delony, Edward James Died May 11, 1902
Delony, Helen Key Dec. 16, 1873 - Fe. 06, 1964
Delony, Henry No Dates
Delony, Nannie E. Hunt No Dates Wife of E. J. Delony @ Jan. 25, 1896
Delony, Thomas Henderson 1866 -1907
Delony, Tobias Stephens May 10, 1870 - Aug. 04, 1919
Delony, Vail Montgomery Jan. 05, 1901 - Nov. 18, 1967

Delony, Alice Stephens/Stevens (see Delony, Edward J. Delony, Sr.)
BIOS: “Northeast Louisiana is proud to claim Alice Stephens Delony as one of the great heroines of the Civil War days and of the Reconstruction period. Alice Stephens was born in Warren Co., Miss., on June 30, 1840. Her father, Tobias Stephens, bought land in the Goodrich Landing area in 1846, and brought his family to Carroll Parish. Alice married (Captain) Edward James Delony on June 21, 1860. They made their home in Floyd, the parish seat of Carroll Parish, where Mr. Delony practiced law.
During the Civil War Mrs. Delony maintained their home while her husband served in the Confederate Army. Captain Delony was stationed at Vicksburg, commanding Co. A., 31st Regiment of the Louisiana Infantry. When he wrote home of the privations and sufferings of his men, his wife went into action. Mrs. Delony with the help of her neighbors, knitted socks and sweaters and sewed shirts, underwear and uniforms for the troops. She carefully packed the clothing and took a long and circuitous route to Monroe, Bayou Sara, Woodville, Clinton, and finally to Vicksburg. She sometime traveled by water, sometimes by land eventually arrived in Vicksburg, where the supplies were delivered.
A former neighbor recalls: “Mrs. Delony was slender, dainty, and soft-voiced. Always dressed simply, but in good taste, using the nicest of material in her costumes. Her home was open always to friends-- she had so many, for everyone loved her. The yard was pretty with its cedar-lined walk and lovely flowers.”
The Delony‘s home was always open to Confederate soldiers and the wounded were cared for tenderly. The task of nursing was a labor of love for Mrs. Delony and for the women in Floyd. Alice died in 1872. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember” (see rest of story September 10, 1892 Banner Democrat)
Alice Stevens, a native of Louisiana, was a daughter of Tobias and Mary (Sessions) Stevens.
NEWSPAPERS: Carroll Record; The newspaper began publication in Floyd in 1866, Mrs. Alice Stephens Delony, wife of Edward J. Delony, bought lots four and five of block 7 on Mulberry Street in the town of Floyd. The very first sale mentioned is dated June 27, 1866, when Sheriff William Collins sold the G. M. Langford property in Floyd. Records dated Nov. 30, 1867, show the Record moved to L.P. that year. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Delony, Annie [see also Alston, Annie (Delony)]

Delony, Ann “Nannie” F.
Miss A. F. Hunt of Jefferson Co. was married to E. J. Delony in 1875. E. J. and A. F. were members of the Episcopal Church. A. F. & E. J. dispensed refined hospitality to their many warm friends.
PLANTATIONS; HAGAMAN: Hagaman Plantation fronting the Mississippi, and located about ½ mile south of L. P., is one of the old places in the parish. It was Lot #1 of the judicial partition of the original Conn Plantation. Acting for Louise Hagaman on Feb. 24, 1880, C. M. Pilcher sold the plantation to Charles Chaffe of N. O., LA., and the Charles Chaffe conveyed to Ann F. Delony, wife of Edward J. Delony, “Hagaman Plantation”. Mrs. Nannie Hunt (Ann F.) Delony, 2nd wife of Edward J. Delony and stepmother to his children, will to Tobias Stephen Delony at her death in 1896, “To my son, Tobe, attentive and loving always, I give my Hagaman Place and horses…” It has remained in the Delony family ever since. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Delony, Edward (Doctor)
Of French origin, and one of the most prominent men of Louisiana. He came to Louisiana in 1839 with his father and family when he was quite young. He married Piannah Shepherd. He was a repeated member of the state senate, from East Feliciana Parish in 1852. He was a member of the secession convention of 1860 and of the constitutional convention that met in 1852. He was a graduate of a medical college and practiced that profession successfully for a number of years, dying in 1867. [*NOTE: 1850 Census of Feliciana Parish, shows 3 other children of Edward J. Delony and Pianiah (Shepherd) Delony. (1) Sarah born @ 1833, (2) E.J., (3) Lorretta born @ 1838, and Julietta, born @ 1842.]
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1860: Dr. Edward Delony, Dr. Andrew Owens, Dr. George W. Tresevant. Dr. Edward and Piannah (Shepherd) Delony was the parents of Edward James Delony, Sr. Dr. Delony, a native of Virginia, moved to Louisiana with his family while the Judge was yet a stripling. They were of French origin. Piannah, his mother, was from Georgia.. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
MASONIC LODGES: Old Solomon Lodge #130, chartered in 1855, was near Goodrich Landing. During the Civil War this lodge suffered the destruction of the U. S. soldiers, afterwards it joined Pecan Grove Lodge # 222. One of the officers of the Pecan Grove Lodge was Dr. Edward Delony. Edward wrote the Rules of Order for the Masonic Lodges of Louisiana, which are still followed today. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Delony Edward James, Jr.
ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF LAKE PROVIDENCE:
L. P. incorporated on July 3, 1876 with the Mayor being Edward J. Delony. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: A local Board of Health was created in 1876. Serving on the board that year were: C. R. Egelly, A. Armstong, T. J. Powell, F. M. Hays, E. J. Delony, and Jason Hamilton. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: V. M. Purdy served as Mayor in 1879. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Elected as vestry on July 27, 1873 was David L. Morgan and John Seay, Wardens. One of the first Vestry was Edward J. Delony. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Delony, Edward James, Sr. [Captain] (1836 - 1892)
BIOS: E. J.(Sr) was born in Talbot Co., Georgia, on the 10th day of July, in the year of our Lord, 1836. the 3re born to Alice and Edward Delony. They were (1) Anna Floretta Delony, (2) Alice Lucinda Delony, (3) Edward James Delony, Jr., (4) Thomas Henderson Delony, (5) Henry Goodrich Delony, and (6) Tobias Stephens Delony. The Banner Democrat of Sept. 10, 1892, stated: “His legal attainments are luminous…. At the Bar and on the Bench he was the peer of very best…As a citizen, being naturally of an aggressive disposition, he was often found in advance of the times. In his fierce and fearless battles with the carpetbag element during the dark days of the reconstruction in this parish the true elements of his character and his noble efforts for the public good stood out in bold relief. He was a fast friend and a fearless enemy. He had a hand as open as day for melting charity.”
At Floyd, in the office of Hugh Short, we first made the acquaintance that soon ripened late intimacy to the then stirring times. The South was all ablaze with succession fires, and there were but few in this section then that had the nerve to peer through the conflagration and the smoke and gaze at the danger ahead. Hugh Short with his rugged eloquence fearlessly fought for the Union, and young Delony equally as fearless and aggressive with burning words of eloquence described the threatened danger to the South. We were with them in the “True Issue”, but it was all in vain, and when the storm and the tempest came, the same Union loving Delony was among the first to shoulder the musket in defense of his beloved Southland, while numbers of the loud-mouthed fire caters, who had denounced the Unionists, sneaked within the Federal lines. In 1862 he had enlisted in the 27th Louisiana Regiment, Co. A., C. S. A. and took part in the siege of Vicksburg and Chickasaw Bayou. When Lee surrendered E. J. was at Shreveport, La. He returned home after all hostilities had ceased. He found his residence burned and his family penniless. He got back to work and by perseverance he acquired nice property of about 400 acres.
We may here pertinently say that the Judge never failed all through life to evince the courage of his convictions. He devoted himself like a good citizen to his family and his profession as Councilor and Attorney-at-Law. How well he succeeded is to a great extent a matter of history. His home devotion is seen in its happy surroundings. His legal attainments were luminous as a matter of public record. At the Bar and on the Bench he was the peer of the very best in the balmy days of the profession, and by his brilliant talent and solid acquirements he commanded the respect and admiration of his fellow practitioners far and near. At the close of the war, Captain Delony re-established his law practice in Floyd. With the division of Carroll Parish, he moved his law practice to Providence. He and his wife lived in the present Delony home on Lake Street.
When his wife, Alice died in 1872, he then married Miss A. F. Hunt, of Jefferson Co. Miss., in 1875. E. J. and A. F. were members of the Episcopal Church. He was a member of the K. of P. He was liberal to a fault, a successful practitioner, an able jurist and a worthy Christian gentleman. He and his wife, A. F., dispensed refined hospitality to their many warm friends. From "Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Louisiana", by Goodspeed.
BIOS: E. J. who died in 1892, at age 56, had been a newspaper editor-publisher, a political party leader, and attorney-at-law, a soldier and District Judge. A published tribute to him said “Young Delony had fearlessly and aggressively described the danger for the South (just after the Civil War)”; the Union-loving Delony was among the first to shoulder his musket in defense of his beloved Southland”; “the Judge never failed all through his life to evince the courage of his convictions.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: On April 12, 1862, the Confederate Defenders was inducted into the army as Co. K., 31st Louisiana Infantry. This group include E. J. Delony, George Burrus, John Hays, and A. N. McWilliams. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1857: E. J. Delony. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
TRANSPORTATION; WHARF-BOATS; Advertisement in local paper in 1869: “Wharf-boat STAR: We do business on the ‘live and let live‘ principle. (Signed) V. M. Purdy, J. L. Goffe, and E. J. Delony.” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEW TOWN OF PROVIDENCE: “…Providence was born, receiving its amended charter from the state in April, 1876. Three war veterans, J. L. Goffe, V. M. Purdy, and E. J. Delony, operated a wharf boat on the river in front of the town, and new comers C. H. Webb and Cicero M. Allen opened grocery stores in the town. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
TRANSPORTATION; STEAMBOATS; J. M. White. In the Feb. 23rd 1884 issue: “All aboard the palatial J. M. White…”Providence is well represented. Judge and Mrs. Delony, Mrs. Frank Taylor and her amiable relative who accompanies her, Miss Mills of Pennsylvania, Miss Pastoreue, Miss Shank, Capt. Pilcher and Your’s Truly [J. N. Turner]. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
DISTRICT JUDGE: 1877; 8th District: Edward J. Delony. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; GAILLIARD: Gailliard Plantation later became the property of F. F. Montgomery and Edward James Delony. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston. [Note various spellings: Gailliard, Gillard, Gilliard, Gillyard used in parish records]

Delony, Elizabeth Louise (Miller) (see Delony, Vail)
MODERN BANKS; THE BANK OF DIXIE / THE LAKE PROVIDENCE BANK: The Advisory Committee of the Bank of Dixie is composed of Ted J. Oliver, Frank Voelker, an Mrs. Vail Delony. “ [Info 1977] Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. Vail M. Delony. One of the Regents of the Moses Shelby Chapter since Mrs. McDaniel has been Mrs. Vail M. Delony.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Delony, Nellie
BIOS: According to a local newspaper: ‘Dr. Kennedy reminisced about the days of his youth and the beautiful belles of that time--Nellie Delony, Mary Montgomery, Dolly Kennedy, Edna Pilcher and many others.’ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Delony, Piannah (Shepherd)
Was a native of Georgia. Wife of Dr. Edward J. Delony

Delony, Tobias “Tobe” Stephens
Tobe Deloney was the son of Edward James Delony, Sr. (1836 - 1892) and Alice Stephens Delony. He married Helen Montgomery of Greenville, MS. .
ASSESSORS; 1896: T. S Delony, Deputy. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
Miss A. F. Hunt of Jefferson Co. was married to E. J. Delony in 1875. E. J. and A. F. were members of the Episcopal Church. A. F. & E. J. dispensed refined hospitality to their many warm friends.
PLANTATIONS; HAGAMAN: Mrs. Nannie Hunt (Ann F.) Delony, 2nd wife of Edward J. Delony and stepmother to his children, willed to Tobias Stephens Delony at her death in 1896, “To my son, Tobe, attentive and loving always, I give my Hagaman Place and horses…” It has remained in the Delony family ever since. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Delony, Vail Montgomery
BIOGRAPHIES: Vail Montgomery Delony was born in Lake Providence, La. On Jan. 5, 1901. His parents were Helen Montgomery Delony and Tobias Stephens Delony. He grew up and lived in L. P. all of his life. On Dec. 26, 1926, he married Elizabeth Louise Miller of Greenville, Miss. They had 2 daughters, (1) Elizabeth Delony Reed and (2) Vail Delony Baldridge. His four granddaughters are Elizabeth Vail Reed, and Kathryn, Elizabeth and Mary Sue Baldridge.
Vail Montgomery Delony was born into a family of public servants--for on both sides of his family were such men. His grandfather, Edward J. Delony, served as first Mayor of the Town of Providence in 1876, and then as Judge of the 8th Judicial District in 1880. Dr. Edward Delony, his great-grandfather, served in the Senate of the State of Louisiana from East Feliciana Parish 1852. Judge John Wes Montgomery, his maternal great grandfather, was Judge of the Parish of Tensas, and later moved to Carroll Parish and became a law partner with J. E. Ransdell.
Vail Delony was first elected State Representative in 1940, and served in the House until his death in 1967. During these twenty-seven years, he was Chairman of the Committee on Transportation & Highways from 1948 through 1960. He was a member and then Chairman of the State Licensing Board for Contractors, a member of the Legislative Budget Committee, the Board of Liquidation of State Debt, the La. Office Building Corp., the State Bond & Building Comm. and many other boards and commissions. In May 1964, he was selected by the members of the House to serve as Speaker of the House of Representatives under the administration of Gov. John J. McKeithen. He presided with dignity and honor in this position until his death on Nov. 17, 1967.
Vail worked hard to improve the highway system and earned the nickname “Mr. Highways“. He helped establish a minimum salary schedule for teachers. As chairman of the joint legislative committee on Retirement he was instrumental in setting up the present state and local retirement systems for public employees.
In April 1958, the Police Jury Association of La. honored Vail Delony by publicly citing him for “distinguished public service“ and expressed “appreciation of the many Legislative Acts sponsored for the benefit of Police Juries and citizens of La.
For his work in securing a port facility for E. C. Parish a resolution was adopted by the Port Comm. “gratefully acknowledging that his foresight, leadership, and counsel made this port a reality and we realize how much his demise means to us all.”
He was always interested in public libraries for the state and was instrumental in securing legislation beneficial to the La. State Library system.
With quiet forcefulness, sure knowledge and effective humor, Vail Delony achieved success with honor as he combined public service with a varied business career as a farmer and contractor. He was President of the North La. Federal Savings & Loan Association, and served for many years as a Director of the Bank of Dixie. He was a vestryman of Grace Episcopal Church and on one of the church’s Minutemen to build a new church. He was an active member of the Sons of the American Revolution.
On March 25, 1968, Gov. John J. McKeithen dedicated the Vail M. Delony Data Processing Center of the La. Dept of Public Safety in Baton Rouge. Mrs. Delony and her daughters attended the ceremonies. Vail Delony had been a tireless and effective supporter of all efforts which would bring better law enforcement to Louisiana..” Georgia Pinkston’s “A Place to Remember”
MASONIC LODGES: Vail Delony’s great grandson, Edward Delony wrote the Rules of Order for the Masonic Lodges of Louisiana, which are still followed. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Delpit in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Delpit, Blanche R. Nov. 22, 1889 - Nov. 01, 1967

Dempsey family“We have no record of a permanent settlement in this area (Lake Providence) prior to 1803 at which time the Federal Government purchased the Louisiana Territory from France. However, we have seen by LaSalle’s journey down the river and other evidence, that traders and missionaries were in the area long before this. No doubt a trading post, maybe small, had been in or near the present site of Lake Providence for some time. "A Place to Remember" Pinkston.
Legend has it that a family by the name of Dempsey lived in the lake in the late 1700’s. They lived in a wigwam, had a cow, farmed, hunted, and traded. This name appears later in the area which became known as Ward Two of West Carroll Parish. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Dempsey, Joe
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: "John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
“TOWN OF PROVIDENCE: The first settlers searched no further, but made their homes here. The first settlement consisted of ‘mud house along the river front’ and a family named Dempsey is said to be the first permanent settler. From "A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
"Legend has it that a family by the name of Dempsey lived on the lake in the late 1700's. They lived in a wigwam, had a cow, farmed, hunted, and traded. This name appears later in the area which became known as as Ward 2 of West Carroll Parish." From "A Place to Remember", by Georgia Pinkston.

Dempsey, Charles & Rachel
In the 1830's settlers began to grow quantities of cotton. Cotton gins came into the area between the rivers as we can see by this land transaction: "Charles & Rachel Dempsey purchased land on March 9, 1839, located in Carroll parish on the west side of Macon River, located 1 mile below the Herring Gin and 6 miles above the State Road." "Between the Rivers" McKoin.

Dempsey, Solomon
PLANTATIONS: James E. Old tells of his arrival in 1824: “ Solomon Dempsey was the first settler in the country around Lake providence. He lived on Sol‘s Bayou which took its name from him; he built on the bayou where J. C. Drew‘s Negro quarters were, the same place where Capt. E. C. Manning has his Negro Houses now. Dempsey had a large family, but soon after I got here he left and moved out to the Macon Hill. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Denburgh [see Van Denburgh]

Dent in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dent, Mattie Rabb 1864 - 1944

Derevas, R. H. (Father)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: In 1881 Father Mahe began a long tenure as pastor of St. Patrick‘s remaining here until 1907. He erected a Convent which was on the top floor of the school building. Father M. P. Nothofer followed Father Mahe as priest from 1907 to 1912; Father August Schaefer, 1912 to 1918; Father R. H. Derevas, 1918 to 1919; and Father Robert H. DeVriendt, 1919 to 1934. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Desadier in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Desadier, Marshall J. Dec. 24, 1887 - Jug. 28, 1951
Desadier, Preston J. 08/16/1912 - 07/22/1994 C

DeSantos, Miguel
“EARLY SETTLERS: Another certificate of ownership, numbered 25 and recorded in a local coveyance record (Book B., page 397), indicated that Miguel de Santo was given a tract of land in 1788 consisting of 40 arpents front by 40 arpents deep, situated on the Bayou Macon in the post of Ouachita. .“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
PLANTATIONS; CROW’S ROOST: “During the Spanish Regime, large land grants were made to favorites of Governor Miro, one, of two grants, was to Miguel DeSanto in 1787. These two grants later bore the name Crow’s Roost, located below the town of Monticello.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

DeSoto, Hernando
In 1542 Hernando DeSoto , a dashing Cavalier and adventurer from Spain, came down the Mississippi River (meaning "Father of Waters") of which he discovered and named. He contracted a fever and died after a short time, and was buried along the great river he discovered. [Some believe he was buried along the river at Lake Providence, others think Lake Village]

Deval, Edith (Miss)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1898 Miss Edith Deval and Miss Carrie M. Jackson taught in the parish. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Devine in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Devine, ? Jan. 26, 1872 - Sept. 27, 1903
Devine, ? 1872 - 1903

DeVriendt, Robert H. (Father)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: In 1881 Father Mahe began a long tenure as pastor of St. Patrick‘s remaining here until 1907. He erected a Convent which was on the top floor of the school building. Father M. P. Nothofer followed Father Mahe as priest from 1907 to 1912; Father August Schaefer, 1912 to 1918; Father R. H. Derevas, 1918 to 1919; and Father Robert H. DeVriendt, 1919 to 1934. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Deweese in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Deweese, J. W. May 19, 1872 - Jan. 18, 1918

DeWeese, Wilma
1929 ECHO: She is listed in the Junior Class at the East Carroll Parish High School.
1920 E. C. CENSUS: Wilma was born in Indiana. Herman J. DeWeese and Essie DeWeese were natives of Ohio. Not able to read what her dad's occupation is, only that it has something to do with fish. Wilma G. has three sisters: Lilly, 12, Mary, 9, and Alice, 1 11/12. One brother, Gerald who is 14. The 1930 E. C. census has her dad as the owner of a meat market, and Mary and Gerald are not living in the household.

Dewitt in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dewitt, Henry Harrison Nov. 25, 1884 - April 25, 1956

Dickerson, Bill“RIFT AMONG NEIGHBORS: Mrs. Flake‘s parents lived south of Floyd, the Dickersons, Roberts, and Cawthorn to the west, and none of them ever heard their parents or grandparents say that Floyd was damaged very much. It is inconceivable to me that the children of parents living in Floyd during the Civil War never heard of much destruction there. Janie Gibson‘s mother and mother-in-law were near Floyd, one on Colonel Lott‘s place to the east of Floyd, and the other on the Moore and Wilson farms, just north of Floyd on the Macon front. Janie never heard either say that Floyd was burned and she knows the Wilson and Moore homes wee not destroyed as her husband Ben Gibson tore the old Moore house down after they bought the place in the 1920‘s from John LeFevre.” From the book “Between the Rivers”, by Florence McKoin.
I was told that Bill Dickerson's home was always open to the James and Younger Brothers. At time he rode with them on forays across the Macon River into Yankee territory. "Between the Rivers", McKoin

Dickerson, Ray
MOBILE HOME FACTORY: In 1973 Woodcrest, Inc. located on Sparrow Street . Officers of this organization are Ray Dickerson, President; Robert Wallis, Vice-President; and Ron Marshall, Secretary-Treasurer--all three young men are under forty years of age. [Info 1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Dickson, P. N.
BRIARFIELD ACADEMY: P. N. Tomlinson serves on the Board of Directors of Briarfield Academy Board [1977]. “ A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dietzler, G. W. (Colonel, Union)
FEDERAL OCCUPATION OF CARROLL PARISH: Colonel G. W. Dietzler, 13th Corp., commanding an advance party of General James B. McPherson’s Corps, arrived at Lake Providence on Feb. 1, 1863, to establish a headquarters and examine the possibility of digging a canal from the MS. River to into the lake. Within 3 days of his arrival Dietzler had rounded up 100 able-bodied slaves, to send to Delta for working on the canal there. There was no Confederate opposition to Dietzler’s landing. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Diggs in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Diggs, Robert No Dates

Dillon, John (Mr. Saint)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. In 1868 Mr. St. John Dillon held services at the Masonic Hall. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: On May 1, 1869 the Rev. Mr. Dillon preached at the Masonic Hall. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dinger in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dinger, Alfred J. Aug. 23, 1921 - Sept. 12, 1943 "Sgt."
Dinger, Chris Anna Dept. 25, 1898 - April 22, 1983
Dinger, Edward Delaun, Sr. June 08, 1927 - March 28, 1990 DM W/ ~ Marie Hamley Dinger - SFC US Army Korea
Dinger, Marie Hamley No Dates

Divincenzi in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Divincenzi, Salvador Sept. 12, 1923 - Nov. 18, 1923

Dixon, L. V.
CHURCHES; ASSEMBLY OF GOD: “Located on the corner of 4th & Hamley Streets, the 1st Assembly of God Church was founded on Oct. 20, 1950. Pastors in early years were Reverends W. W. Davenport, G. D. Wilson, Paul J. Young, L. O. Lormand, and Steve Grizzle. Present pastor is L. V. Dixon [1977].” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dixon, Van
NEWSPAPERS; “The Pelican was published briefly by Van Dixon, a Negro, during the 1960’s.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Dobbs, Mr.
TOWN OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, THRU THE EYES OF A VISITOR IN 1840: “One of the officers of the bank was a German named Dobbs, at whose house my mother, father, and myself dined, when for the first time either of us saw a four-tined-silver fork, and each as ignorant as the other how to use them.” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Doggett in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Doggett, Alma Lampton Dec. 17, 1893 - June 21, 1925 DM W/BABY ~
Alma L. Lampton Doggett
Doggett, Alma L. June 26, 1919 - Aug. 18, 1920 DM W/MOTHER ~ Alma Lampton Doggett

Dollerhide, Dr. William McG.
Dr. William McG. Dollerhide, from the Floyd area, had been to college and finished at medical school by the beginning of the 1900’s. He was unanimously elected Superintendent of Education in West Carroll Parish at the time there were only thirteen schools in the parish. He resigned in 1920’s.

Domino, Sam Jr. [see Salemi, Annette]

Dominque in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dominque, Emma 1865 - 1944 MOTHER

Donnally / Donnelly, C. A.
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament”. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’ stand. C. A. Donnally of East Carroll was Herald for the tilting contest. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Donnally / Donnelly, John B.
J. B. was born in 1846 in Ohio. He was a son of John H. & Martha A. (Alexander) Donnally. He was of Irish descent on his father's side, and he was proud of the fact that his great-grandfather was a patriot soldier in the Revolutionary cause in the command of General Washington. He had some education at the Centenary College, but at the opening of the war between the states he enlisted in the 2nd Mississippi Cavalry, when he was 15 years old, serving 4 years and participating with the Army of Tennessee in all of its historic engagements. At war's end, at the age of 20, he was in command of his own company. He was a traveling salesman for a wholesale grocery house, out of Evansville, Indiana till 1875, relinquished all to locate in E. C. Parish, La., engaging in planting and making his home. In 1889 he was appointed to the office of U. S. Marshal of the eastern district of Louisiana, with gratified satisfaction. He was a Republican on most national issues. Captain Donnally was married to Blanche Adylette in Memphis, TN. in 1870. They had one son. In business and personally the Captain was one of the most popular of men. He was a member of the K. of P. and of the American Legion of Honor.

Donnelly / Donnally, J. A. (Captain)
CHURCHES; PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: The Presbyterian Church was built in 1852 and stayed until 1876, when Captain J. A. Donnelly bought the shell, destroyed during the Civil War with cannon balls. A new church was built in 1962, with Rev. George York as pastor, on land that the old church had been on, and the Holt family donated a new pipe organ. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Donohue, Mr.
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN:
Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: Donohue and Bryan (a woman) were carpenters, undertakers and builders. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
EARLY BUSINESS OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, LA.: Lake Providence has always been the seat of government for the parish, except from 1855 to 1870, when, as a part of the parish of Carroll, the seat was moved to Floyd (now West Carroll). Some of the business house and churches of the early town mentioned in old newspapers are: (1848-1881) Donohue & Bernard. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Dooley, E. L.
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. E. L. Dooley also served as a pastor there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dorkins in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dorkins, Mary A. McNeal 1868 - 1944 MOTHER

Dorsey in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dorsey, Julia E. (see Overton, Julia E. Dorsey)

Dorsey, Levi
BLACK CHURCHES; MT. OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH: It was begun about 1807 on Buckmeadow Plantation by Ed Williams, Al Williams, and Levi Dorsey. The church has been rebuilt twice. The Rev. Carr is the present pastor. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Dorsey, Willie (see Banks, Leandrew)

Dorsey, Zachariah H.
PLANTATIONS; BLACK BAYOU: “John F. Webb of Washington, D. C. bought it from Napoleon E. Larche on April 30, 1846, and sold the 418 acres to Zachariah H. Dorsey. The land lay immediately in the rear of land owned by Michael Ross on the lake.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS: “Willson bought an additional tract of 300 acres from Z. H. Dorsey and Thomas Jefferson Collins which fronted on River Bayou and adjoined the plantation of William L. Balfour on one side and Govy Hood on the other. It include “dwelling house, mill, gin house, farming utensils, eight first rate work mules, 12 good work horses, two good ox waggons, eight yoke oxen, one hundred head of cattle, and twenty five slaves.“ “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Douglas, Archie
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. Archie Douglas was one of the 16 knights that marched up to the grand stand.”…. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’s stand. Archie Douglas’ total, as rendered by the Judges, was 9 rings. His nickname was listed as “Knight of T. P. Leathers“. 2nd Prize was $75. At the Tournament Ball, Mr. Archie Douglas placed a floral wreath around the brow of Miss Narcisse Williams [later, Mrs. W. D. Brown], as 1st Maid of Honor. Judgess selected to determine the result of the tilting contest and time keepers were Messrs. Douglas, of Tensas. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Douglas, George
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. George Douglas was one of the 16 knights that marched up to the grand stand.”…. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’s stand. George Douglas’ total, as rendered by the Judges, was 10 rings. Judges selected to determine the result of the tilting contest and time keepers were Messrs. Douglas, of Tensas. His nickname was listed as “Knight of Laura Lee”. Douglas, of Tensas Parish, had the best time of six and a quarter seconds. He also combined the best score and the best time, winning the 1st prize of $100. The Tournament Ball opened with the crowning of the Queen of Love and Beauty, Miss Alma Egelly, by Mr. George Douglas. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Douglas, W. T. (Rev.)
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. The Rev. W. T. Douglas took charge of the parish on April 9, 1884, but resigned on April 18, 1886. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Downen, Wendell
BLACK CHURCHES; JERUSALEM MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: Built in 1953 on land donated by Mr. George W. Cooper of Bunch’s Bend, purchased from Bill Hubbard for $400. It‘s cemetery is on the Wendell Downen‘s farm. 1st pastor is O. L. Virgil, resigning in 1958, succeeded by E. D. Handle, who remains as pastor in 1976. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Doyle in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Doyle, Abby died 11-10-1911, age 50

Dozier, Charlie
E. CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWI: Charlie Dozier, Pvt., died of Pneumonia & Pleurisy, March 20, 1919.

Drake, H. W.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1863: H. W. Drake. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Draughon, John“WAR’S END: It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy.
Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1869: J. W. Draughn. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Draughon, W. A.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: “From across the Macon River came the Floyd Guards, under the command of John W. Dunn. Among those serving in the Guards were D. W. Kelly, W. A. Draughon, and Wesley McGuirt.” “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Draw, Mr.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1846: Mr. Draw. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Drew, Emanuel C.
Emanuel C. Drew is an intelligent, enterprising and successful young "knight of the scissors," and is now ably editing the Louisiana Advance, one of the spiciest, breeziest journals of this section of the State. He was born in Carroll Parish, La., November 1, 1858, being the youngest of three sons, the other two members of the family being Robert H., who is a resident of Black Hawk Landing, and is superintendent of a large cotton plantation, and Judge Larche C., who resides in Calhoun, Ouachita Parish, La., being the editor and proprietor of the Experimental Farmer, a well known agricultural paper. Their father, Capt. Newit J. Drew, was a native Louisiana, born in 1831, and was a distinguished soldier during the secession, being captain of Drew's battery of light artillery, well known in the Trans Mississippi Department. He received the best advantages in his youth, being educated under private tutors at first, afterward entering the university at Baton Rouge, and his wife, Ann Chaney, who was born in Carroll Parish, La, in 1834, was educated in Jackson, La., then the Athens of the State. Both parents are still living in the enjoyment of fairly good health.
Emanuel C. Drew's early education was perfected at home by his mother, who thoroughly grounded him in the common branches and taught him the principles
of business. When he had attained his seventeenth year he began the battle of life for himself as a salesman in a general mercantile establishment, and there he remained until twenty years of age.
In the month of December, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura Smith,a native of Ouachita Parish, La., whose birth occurred in 1860. She was educated principally in Alabama, but her parents were Georgians and her father a cotton planter. Mrs. Drew is a lady of remarkable business tact and acumen, and gives much, valuable aid to her husband in the work of editing the Advance, her excellent address, affable and industrious disposition being cardinal elements of their success.
Mr. Drew began his journalistic career in Minden, La., as editor and proprietor of the Minden Democrat, which he managed successfully through a heated campaign of one year. At the end of that time he purchased the new paper known as the Louisiana Advance, which at that time (1884) had only an eight-quire circulation, but by unflagging energy and Mrs. Drew's fidelity to her husband's interest, the circulation was increased to forty-one quires within one year from date of purchase, besides a large and lucrative job work.
Mr. Drew has always been a true Democrat of the Jeffersonian type, in which he followed in the footsteps of his ancestors, and he has ever taken an active part in local politics, being a stanch, eloquent and able advocate of the principles of his party, and all measures which he considers right and just.
He is justly proud that he is able to say that no Drew of his family ever scratched a Democratic ticket. He has never been an officer of any grade, has never aspired to be, being content to use his influence in electing to office those whom he considers more suitable men. He deserves the highest commendation from his country men generally, regardless of politics, for the active and very intelligent manner in which he advertised the northern part of the State, and is now secretary of the North Louisiana Immigration
Association. The energy with which he has pushed matters has been remarkable for a man of his years, and the good his work has done is almost untold. He has sent authentically compiled literature to all pars of the Union, and many have become interested in the beauty and richness of Northern Louisiana. Mr.Drew has been district land agent for the V.S. & P.R.R. for four years, and has performed a vast amount of business for them, the accuracy with which every detail has been attended to, stamping him as a man of fine executive ability, persistency and determination. His work for this parish has been most exemplary in every particular, which is a source of great satisfaction to him. He is a member of the K. of P. of Ruston, La., and he and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church at Arcadia, La. They are well established in life, and have a sufficient amount of this world's goods to make them comfortable and happy, and expect to make their home in Northern Louisiana, where a bright and successful future is awaiting many a home seeker. Mr. Drew is secretary of the Louisiana Sate Land Company, and is also agent for a large land owner of Illinois, and withal, conducts the largest land business in the northern part of the State. Source: Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northwest Louisiana

Drew, Hewitt J.
MASONIC LODGES: Monticello Lodge Number 92. Records, dated Sept. 1, 1866 show the following "Walter T. C. Anderson and wife, Pamela Jane Jackson, in consideration of his great desire to promote the cause of Masonry and morality throughout the land and for the general good of the community, has given and grated forever unto Hewett J. Drew, master, and Walter T. C. Anderson, Secretary, and Littlebray J. Land, junior Warden of the Masonic Lodge known as Monticello Lodge No. 92, and to their successors in office... a parcel of land situated in the town of Floyd...." “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Drew, James C.
In 1832 Carroll Parish was carved out of Ouachita Parish by the State Legislature. Some of the 1st Sheriffs were Duke G. Clary, Thomas Robeau Patton, John D. Harding, Geo. W. Grant, James C. Drew, Edmund R. Travis, William L. S. D. Oliver, Alex G. Lane, and William W. Collins, the last sheriff before reconstruction days disrupted everything. "Between the Rivers", McKoin
"October 14, 1833 we find Elizabeth Finley deeding to J. C. Drew, the land lying west of Bayou Macon and known as the same as that which was improved by Samuel Finley." "Between the Rivers" McKoin
????????and this is the greatest encomium which any man can receive--mainly, the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. He had been unwell for a month or so, but not dangerously. The family felt no uneasiness about him and it was not until they were called to his death bed, that they ever dreamed of a fatal termination. In fifteen minutes after they were called up, he was dead. He had been suffering with his heart, and was taken off in a fit of apoplexy. His remains were taken to Vicksburg, and buried with the rites of his people, Rabbi H. M. Bien performed the ceremony.” L. P. NEWSPAPER
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1843: James Drew. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS: James E. Old tells of his arrival in 1824: …Solomon Dempsey built on the bayou where J. C. Drew‘s Negro quarters were, the same place where Capt. E. C. Manning has his Negro Houses now.[1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Dreyfuss, Solomon
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: Solomon Dreyfus served as Mayor from 1887 to 1888. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston. [see also Dryfuss]

Drummond, Herbert [see Perry, Ruby]

Dryfuss family
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, ALSATIA:
Originally settled by the Dryfusses, the Aschaffenburgs, and other migrant German families. The raising of race horses by Lensing, Inc. is the chief activity, other than farming. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Dube, Bermel (Rev.)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: Between 1953 to 1969, one of the reverends was Bermel Dube. In 1969 Father Harry O. Barker, the present rector, came to St. Patricks Church. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

DuBose in Lake Providence Cemetery:
DuBose, Ellen Jane (see Saint, Ellen Jane DuBose)
DuBose, M. born 1811, age 77 years

DuBose, Malachi / Malachai
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN:
Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: Malachai Dubose was a lawyer and a preacher. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: The La. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church sent a minister named Malachi DuBose in 1850. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
MAYORS: There are no town records before 1876, but other local records mention Malachi DuBose as one of the early mayors in 1870. “A Place to Remember”
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: On Oct. 21, 1878, The East Carroll Parish Court states that because of the prevalence of yellow fever in the country that by the suggestion of the bar, it ordered the court adjourned. Malachi DuBose, Judge. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1850& 1869: M. DuBose. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH JUDGE: 1879 - 1880: Malachi DuBose. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

DuBose, Mildred
TELEPHONE COMPANY: The third location was a residence on Scarborough Street where the First National Bank now has a parking lot. In 1923 the Southern Bell System bought the telephone system. Mrs. Margie DuBose, recently retired, was an employee that year. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dudley, B. F.
EDUCATION: In 1897 C. R. Egelly was parish superintendent, and B. F. Dudley was principal of the school in Providence. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.“

Duff, Colonel (Union)
FEDERAL OCCUPATION OF CARROLL PARISH: Colonel Duff, of the (Union) Engineer Brigade, thought that neither, the Baxter Bayou nor the Tensas Bayou was practicable for the canal…”either plan involves the destruction of the town (which was almost deserted), of which we consider of no sufficient importance to interfere with the accomplishment of the project.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Duke, Fred
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, ELMWOOD:
Originally named for the plantation where he was raised U. S. Senator Joseph E. Ransdell. Much of this land in this part of the parish and had belonged to him and his brother Judge F. X. Ransdell. J. E. sold the land that was lying just southwest of L. P.. Among the first settlers in Elmwood were Bill Gibson, and his brother Tillman Gibson; Bobby Miller, and his four sons; Lee Duke, Fred Duke, and Tolliver Ellis, some of them coming from Texas around 1928. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Duke, Lee
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, ELMWOOD:
Originally named for the plantation where he was raised U. S. Senator Joseph E. Ransdell. Much of this land in this part of the parish and had belonged to him and his brother Judge F. X. Ransdell. J. E. sold the land that was lying just southwest of L. P.. Among the first settlers in Elmwood were Bill Gibson, and his brother Tillman Gibson; Bobby Miller, and his four sons; Lee Duke, Fred Duke, and Tolliver Ellis, some of them coming from Texas around 1928. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Dukes, Angie (see Fortenberry, Fount & Angie)

Dukes, Claude
CHURCHES; MELBOURNE BAPTIST: Located south of Transylvania, Hwy 65, and organized in 1940 by 30 citizens. First pastor was Rev. V. W. Fairchild. Of the original members, Mr. L. F. McAdams, Mr. & Mrs. Claude Dukes, and Mrs. Ruby Dukes Walters are still members [1977] . “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dukes, Lilla (see Brackin, Lilla)

Dukes, Ruby (see Walters, Ruby (Dukes))

Dunbar, Louise (see Hagaman, Louise)

Dunbar, Robert
PLANTATIONS; HOLLYBROOK: Hollywood was owned, at one time, by Robert Dunbar and his wife, Elizabeth. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Duncan, E. R.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1859: E. R. Duncan. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Duncan, Ed F.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1862: Ed. F. Duncan. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Duncan, Reverend
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: “The church is located on Davis Streets. In 1915 - 1917 pastors listed was Reverend Timmin and Duncan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Duncan, William J.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1859: William J. Duncan. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Dunham in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dunham, Beulah Dixon Jan. 4, 1980 - June 08, 1980

Dunlap, Mr.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1838: Mr. Dunlap. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Dunn in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dunn, Ella Died July 02, 1887 Age 21 years - Wife of J. W. Dunn
Dunn, Ella July 26, 1887 Age 25 years - Daughter of Ella & J. W. Dunn
Dunn, Helen (see Nelson, Helen Dunn) (see original paper)
Dunn, Helen (see Parker, Helen Dunn) (see original paper)
Dunn, Jeff J. Jan. 11, 1865 - Sept. 20, 1891 Born at Rusk .,TX.~
Died in W. Carroll Parish, La.
Dunn, J. W. "Captain" March __, 1876 Age 52 years.
Dunn, J. W. Nov. 29, 1855 - Dec. 02, 1903
Dunn, Lucretia Roberts Oct. 24, 1870 - Dec. 25, 1950
Dunn, Philia (see Stanley, Philia Dunn)
Dunn, Marion (see Pittman, Marion Dunn)
Dunn, Regina (see Leach, Regina Dunn)
Dunn, William E. Feb. 10, 1861 - Oct. 15, 1921

Dunn Family
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 13:24:20 -0330 From: Kimberly Nolan
“My grandmothers maiden name is Dunn. My family is black her mother my great grandmother either was a slave or was born right after slavery I am trying to see where the name derived from and if their were any plantation owners by the name of Dunn in that area. My great -great grandparents last name was Straighter. “
“My grandmother was born, as we know, in Millikin, La or East Carroll Parish her name then was Alice Dunn her mother's name was Frances Straughter or (Strawter) we are unsure of the spelling. My ancestors may have resided at Panola Plantation and Millikin plantation. As for Sarah Stroughter was she black or white?.” KIMBERLY

Dunn, Cecil Truett
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Cecil Truett Dunn was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dunn, Hiram
L.P.H.S. FOOTBALL: Head coach Frank Byerley’s 1922 championship team included Hiram Dunn. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Dunn, John W.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: “From across the Macon River came the Floyd Guards, under the command of John W. Dunn. Among those serving in the Guards were D. W. Kelly, W. A. Draughon, and Wesley McGuirt.” “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS AND TOWN AFFAIRS: [Carroll Watchman, April 22, 1875]
“The people of Providence were fortunate in the selection of Captain J. W. Dunn as one of the Board of Aldermen, and the Mayor displayed good judgment in appointing him as street commissioner.”
“Captain Dunn has just finished a culvert at the lake end of Sparrow Street.” “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
RECREATION AND SPORTS: The True Louisianians, organized in 1873, included W. G. McRae, James Lyons, J. F. Cannon, W. T. Smith, J. W. Dunn, James Turner, George Powell, Paul Jones, and W. K. Spurlock. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: The Eureka B. B. C. Mr. W. M. Abbott, the light and airy Deputy Clerk of Carroll, was chosen to look after the money as Treasurer, and Mr. Charles Sweet, Captain of the Field; with Hugh Leddy, Lieutenant. The following are the playing nine, who are to immortalize themselves this season; Charles Sweet, Catcher; Hugh Leddy, pitcher; Frank Armstrong, first base; Frank Leddy, second base; Thomas Leddy, third base; Eugene Leddy, short stop; James Dunn, left field; Abbe Richard, centre field; J. J. Stanfill, right field.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1892: J. W. Dunn. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
LAW; THREE COURTHOUSES: On July 1, 1901, the old courthouse was replaced by a new building which was dedicated by Pecan Grove Lodge. The cornerstone bore the names of the first Police Jury: Robert Nicholson, President; W. C. Hope, Phil McGuire, A. M. Nelson, T. W. Jay, Members; Yancy Bell, Jury Clerk; F. X. Ransdell, Judge; J. W. Dunn, Sheriff; George F. Blackburn, Town Clerk. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dunn, Marian (see BIOGRAHIES: Pittman Brothers)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1912, some of the well-remembered teachers included Miss Lillian King at Millikin, Miss Ethel Mitchell at Transylvania, Miss Marian Dunn at Waddell, Miss Susie Bell Peek at Sondheimer. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dunn, Thomas W.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1843 & 1852: Dr. Thomas W. Dunn. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Dunn, W. E.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902. One of the Directors was W. E. Dunn. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1904: W. E. Dunn. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dunn, William L.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. William L. Dunn was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Dunston in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dunston, Elmo O. Died Aug. 30, 1982 No Marker

DuPuy, Samuel
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1841: Samuel DuPuy. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Durrell, A.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Dutton, Alice ( see BIOGRAPHIES: Amacker, Robert)

Dutton, G. A.
EDUCATION; SUPERINTENDENTS: In 1912, G. A. Dutton became both superintendent and principal and was followed in 1914 by Ward Anderson in both positions. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.“

Dye in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Dye, Laura Louise Nov. 13, 1888 - Feb. 08, 1970 MOTHER
Dye, Thomas L. Sept. 26, 1889 - Dec. 08, 1980 FATHER

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