Sunday, September 12, 2010

A & B Surnames

***NOTE: Please read a note at the bottom of this page...

Abernathy, Annie H. - Byrne, T.

Abernathy, Annie H.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Annie H. Abernathy. “A Place to Remember”

Abernathy, Sue (Maben)
1929 ECHO ~ Sue Maben was the Treasurer on the 'Annual Staff'. She was in the Senior class in 1929: "Voted very sarcastic, but not when you know her. Terribly serious especially in her affairs with blue eyed boys--did you say boys? No--we all know it's Roy only. Very neat and attractive. Always a jolly good sport when there's money to be raised---and that's all the time." She is one of the Quartet, Choral Club, Booster Club, & Secretary of the Annual.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Sue Maben Abernathy. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.
Sue Maben was listed as one of the Worthy matrons of Providence Chapter Number 42, of the Order of the Eastern Star. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Abbott, W. M. (some spell it Abbett)
RECREATION, SPORTS:
Baseball was long a popular sport in the parish. The Eureka Club team, champions one year, had a deputy clerk, W. M. Abbott, as treasurer, and other officers were called Captain of the Field and Lieutenant.
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: August D. Wright was the editor and Cain Sartain, a Negro man, was one of the proprietors. A 1873 issue: “David Jackson and W. M. Abbot, Clerks of District Court.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: The Eureka B. B. C. Mr. W. M. Abbott, the light and airy Deputy Clerk of Carroll, was chosen to look after the money as Treasurer, and Mr. Charles Sweet, Captain of the Field; with Hugh Leddy, Lieutenant. The following are the playing nine, who are to immortalize themselves this season; Charles Sweet, Catcher; Hugh Leddy, pitcher; Frank Armstrong, first base; Frank Leddy, second base; Thomas Leddy, third base; Eugene Leddy, short stop; James Dunn, left field; Abbe Richard, centre field; J. J. Stanfill, right field.

Abernathy, Annie H.
Annie was listed as one of the Worthy matrons of Providence Chapter Number 42, of the Order of the Eastern Star.

Adair, David
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir Georges, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Adair, General John
“We find the names of John Mason and Sir Georges, and others forming a corporation to settle some of the territory but it seems they failed. It is more than a hundred years before we find the land in another grant. This one made to Baron de Bastrop by the King of Spain in the 1790’s. We have seen the Baron’s efforts to settle the portion of his grant west of Boeuf River, but we find no such effort to do the same east of the river. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. If Adair ever attempted to entice real settlers to the area, we found no record of it. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
EARLY SETTLERS: “In 1836 David B. Scarborough owned 1,060 acres, called Oasis Plantation, Local Conveyance Records dated 1837 show that ‘Chambliss, Robert J., and Louis Selby purchased a tract of 34,000 acres fronting on the west side of Bayou Macon in the Bastrop Grant.’ Previously this holding had been conveyed by General John Adair to Leonard Claiborne, for $3,630.80. ‘in what was then Carroll Parish‘.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Adams in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Adams, Ida Blanton July 29, 1888 - Aug. 5, 1957
Adams, James Rosser Nov. 01, 1880 - Jan. 06, 1942
Adams, James Rosser, Jr. July 12, 1914 - Dec. 30, 1936
Adams, Katherine (see Pogue, Katherine Adams)
Adams, Mary Lena Aug. 01, 1901 - Aug. 06, 1985 DM W/W. L. Adams
Adams, W. L. Feb. 10, 1897 - Feb. 11, 1931 DM W/Mary Lena Adams
Adams, Vivian (see Rodge, Vivian Adams)

Adams, Clifton “Cliff” C.
Cliff Adams, of Tallulah, became District Judge for the three parishes of East Carroll, Madison, and Tensas in 1963. He is listed as a District Judge, 1963, 9th District.
"According to the Banner Democrat, 'Sixth Judicial District Judge Cliff C. Adams, Thursday, issued restraining orders to prevent federal examiners from registering voters in E. C. Parish and the parish registrar from placing them on the rolls. The petition alleged that this act of putting voters on the list in this method was an 'intrusion and usurpation' of Manning's office. Constitutionality of the federal voting rights law also was challenged in the legal filings." (1960)

Adams, Jessie
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWII: Adams, Jessie, Pvt., Died (Non-Battle)

Adams, Rosser
James was born on July 12, 1914 to James Rosser Sr. and Ida (Blanton) Adams. His father, born Nov. 1, 1880 in Alabama. His father was a State Civil Engineer. He died Jan. 6, 1942. His mother was Ida Blanton, born July 29, 1888 in Mississippi. She passed away Aug. 5, 1957. He had two sisters Vivian, who was a couple years older than him, and another sister Katherine, who was about 8 years younger than he was. He had a younger brother, William B., about 13 years younger. Rosser Jr. died on Dec. 30, 1936.

Adams, Vivian [see also Adams, Rosser, brother]
Vivian Adams attended East Carroll Parish High School. In 1929 she was a senior and a Football Sponsor.

Aden, Eloise (see Howard, Mrs. Rufus Keener, Jr.)

Aicklen, Jim
RECREATION, SPORTS:
Baseball was long a popular sport in the parish. Another team from providence won the championship of north Louisiana in 1872. Jim Aicklen was included in the list of players.
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: Another team from Providence won the championship of north Louisiana in 1872. The players included W. A. Blount, Jim Leddy, Will Short, Thad Smith, Jim Aiklen, and Vail Montgomery.

Aiken, William
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. William Aiken was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Alamon, Jessye
Jessye Alamon married Anderson Andrew Griffin, a Doctor at Harris Hospital in Fort Worth, AR. They had one daughter. Mrs. Griffin and daughter were registered nurses. [See Griffin, G. W.]

Albritton, Mattie
Mattie married William Wesley Bayles. Buron Arnold Bayles born to them on Oct. 14, 1911 at Point, LA. [See also Bayles, Ruron Arnold]

Alexander, Percy
WWII, E. C. CASUALTIES: Alexander, Percy, Pvt. DNB

Alexander, Peter
“We find land transactions recorded in the Clerk of Courts Office in Oak Grove which show that settlers were coming to this part of the country early in the 1800s. In old Book A., page 119, we find this recording, ‘Abram Eddins sold to Peter Alexander a portion of Section 18 T 20, NR10E, being the same land Lafayette Moore and his wife sold to Eddins on June 11, 1812 and recorded in Book, folio 113.’ Descendants of the Moores are with us today, also the Cawthorns.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Alexander, William
METHODIST CHURCH: "In 1870 appointment of regular ministers resumed, one being William F. Alexander in the Providence Circuit in 1872."

Allen in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Allen, Alonzia H. Oct. 9, 1883 - July 30, 1889 Son of W. G. R. & M.
Allen, Marie Inebnit Tschabold 11/06/1885-01/04/1981. Born in Grendenwald, Switzerland
Allen, Thomas Watt May 05, 1868 - Sept 31, 1905

Allen, A. L.
“A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “In 1878, PARISH OFFICIALS FOR West Carroll were first elected. These were Senator; C. Newton, State Rep.; Dr. J. S. Herring, Sheriff; P. M. Gaddis, Clerk Of Court; A. L. Allen, Assessor; Andrew Dannon, Tax Collector; T. M. Gaddis, and Judge; E. D. Hannigan.” From “Between the Rivers” by Florence Stewart McKoin

Allen, Cicero M. (Esq)
In May of 1869 C. M. Allen was serving as chairman of the committee on subscriptions for the Grace Episcopal Church, secured $1,500 for building purposes.
[NEWSPAPER]: Jan. 12, 1867. Dissolution of co-partnership of the late firm of Allen & Aicklen. The successors to said firm are Messrs. C. M. Allen & Bro., composed of Cicero M. Allen and Columbus H. Allen, of New Orleans, both of whom are well known by this community as active business men. C. M. Allen & Bro.'s Dry Goods & Groceries. Cicero M. was a energetic and popular manager of the establishment and was one of the most enterprising merchants to be found anywhere.
[NEWSPAPER]: May 7, 1867 MARRIED At the residence of the bride's father, on Tuesday evening, the 30th ult., by Rev Dr. Sansome, of Vicksburg, Miss Sallie McCarroll and Mr. Cicero M. Allen, of this parish. Columbus, his twin brother was married the same day in New Orleans. On Aug 8, 1868 a Democratic Club was organized with Cicero M. Allen nominated as Treasurer.
Cicero enlisted at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, February 21, 1862; transferred to Co. C, 2nd Arkansas Cavalry, May 15, 1862; appointed first sergeant, June 1, 1862; wounded at Denmark, Tennessee, September 1, 1862; appointed third lieutenant, March 27, 1863; captured at Coldwater, Tennessee, November 3, 1863; sent to U.S. Military Prison, Camp Chase, Ohio; transferred to U.S. Military Prison, Johnson’s Island, Ohio; exchanged; captured at Charleston, Virginia, February 23, 1864; sent to U.S. Military Prison, Fort Delaware; exchanged; promoted second lieutenant, July 20, 1864; paroled at Jackson, Mississippi, May 13, 1865 (gave his address as New Orleans, Louisiana); born c1842 in Holmes county, Mississippi; eyes blue, hair light, complexion light, height 5’ 8”; occupation clerk.
Allen was called "The One-Armed Scout". While he was at Briton's Lane, TX. he was wounded in the arm and made prisoner; his horse was killed in the charge. While at the Federal hospital where his wounds were dressed he walked out of the building, he leaped upon the saddle of the surgeons horse and went into the shelter of the darkness and was soon outside of the enemy's lines. He carried the battle flage of his regiment at Shiloh, until ordered by General Hindman to replace his twin brother. Allen was made Lieutenant at Ponchatoula. His 1st affair was with the small tin-clad vessel, the "Lafitte", around the Amite River. In her efforts to get away the vessel ran upon a snag and was blown up. Allen's men got possession of a schooner, and one of the men dived into the water and secured the gun by a rope and slip knot. Allen's detail of men (2 in number) came upon a yawl of nine Federals, jumped ashore from the schooner prepared an ambush. Allen commanded all to fire, killing the commander of their squad. The remainder jumped in the water and swam to the woods. Allen and his two men kept up the attack. Allen, not disclosing his real number of soldiers, ordered "Cease firing!", then calling upon several imaginary companions to "Halt!" he boldly marched forward and received the surrender of the whole party, two officers being among the number. By himself he rounded up the prisoners, taking their arms and ammunition, and boarded them on the schooner. "Camp Fire Stories of the Mississippi Valley Campaign", by Marie Louise Benton.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. In May 1869 Cicero M. Allen, Esq. served as chairman of the committee on subscriptions, secured $1,500 for building purposes. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Allen, Columbus H.
Columbus enlisted at Corinth, Mississippi, April 1, 1862; transferred to Co. C, 2nd Arkansas Cavalry, May 15, 1862; transferred to Co. G, 14th Confederate Cavalry, and appointed third lieutenant.
NEWSPAPER: May 7, 1867 MARRIED in the city of New Orleans, Miss Emma Postlewaithe and Mr. Columbus H. Allen. His brother Cicero was married the same day in Vicksburg, at the bride's father's residence.
"The Briarfield [Rebels] did some fine service during the Siege of Port Hudson where the Briarfields were active in capturing a Federal wagon train. The advance guard in the venture was commanded by Columbus Allen, the twin brother of Cicero. Although a private, he had been mistaken for his brother by Colonel Powers. The brother availed himself of this opportunity for a good practical joke. Lieutenant Allen came into the left flank of the Federals and did some excellent fighting, capturing 100 wagons, 4 mules and about 40 prisoners, while 20 Federals were killed and wounded. To prevent any further mix-ups between the twins, Columbus Allen was transferred to another division.” “Camp-fire Stories of the Mississippi Campaign”, by Mary Louise Benton.

Allen, Constance [see Schneider, Frederick Hall, III]

Allen, Delpha Bell
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR: Meeting in Pecan Grove Lodge Hall on Sept. 26, 1907, for the purpose of organizing an Easter Star chapter lists Mrs. Delha Bell Allen. She was one of the first officers. The chapter was constituted as Providence Chapter Number 42. Delha Bell Allen was one of the Worthy Matrons of this order. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Allen, Henry Watkins
During Reconstruction time, the Confederate legislature, headed by Governor Henry Watkins Allen, continued to govern that portion of the state still under the control of the Confederacy. With the fall of the Confederacy, this government was disbanded.

Allen, Malcom D. (writer)
INTERNET: From Lake Providence. Written several books: “Against All Odds”, “Tired of Being Broke”, and “Wounded Women”.

Allen, Marsha [see Nelson, Brown Frederick]

Allen, R.B.
CHURCHES: STAR BETHEL MISSIONARY CHURCH; Rev. R. B. Allen is the pastor of this church that was organized in 1956. [Info. 1977]
BLACK CHURCHES; MT. WADE BAPTIST CHURCH: Located in Monticello and been in existence since about 1941. It has only had two pastors: Rev. Smith and R. B. Allen. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BLACK CHURCHES; STAR BETHEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST was organized in 1956 by Rev. W. L. Harris. It is on Scarborough St. on land purchased from the Schneider family. Rev. R. B. Allen is the pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Allen, Richard
BLACK CHURCHES; ST. JAMES AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL was established by an emancipated slave, Richard Allen, 1861. By 1968 a log cabin was built on land deeded by Mrs. Minerva Sparrow. Because it was so close to the Mississippi River they moved it to the corner of Brown and Second in 1891. Rev. B. Alex Gibson is the present pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Alley in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Alley, Marshall W. Jan. 26, 1890 - Aug. 12, 1934

Alling in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Alling, William Ailing, William [Died on Oct. 16, 1892, 84 yrs old, owner of Black Bayou Plantation; NEWSPAPER]

Alling, William
He was born September 24th, 1807, in Newark, New Jersey. He connect himself with the firm of Alling & Bro., of Newark, Madison, Indiana and New Orleans, La. Early in the thirties. They were one of the largest clothing houses in the United States at that time. Mr. William Alling attended to the New Orleans end of the business. He was one of the directors and otherwise connected with several banking institutions of the country between 1840 & 1857. He was united in the holy bonds of matrimony in 1834 to Miss Julia Teasdale of South Carolina. They had seven children, five boys and two girls. Three of the boys and one girl only survive in 1857, and going to Europe and later to Algeria, Africa. When the war commenced the oldest Albert A. returned and joined the Confederates side. He met his fate at the Battle of Malvern Hill. The others getting worse meanwhile the last one dying in 1876.
Mr. Alling often went backwards and forwards during his family’s stay abroad, and in 1865 he went into partnership with Mr. Henry Frellson, they buying cotton property together. He returned with his family from ???ng childhood. They were unusually bright, being especially so in art, several of their works receiving honorable mention in the Academy of Art of Paris, France. They were predisposed to pulmonary troubles, which was the cause of Mr. Allings retiring from active business Africa in 1876, since which time he has lived quietly and unobtrusively on his Black Bayou Plantation. He had the sad misfortune to lose his wife and companion of fifty-four years in 1888.
Mr. Alling was much above the ordinary man. He was noted for his truthfulness and general integrity, for sincerity and candor. A good citizen a kind friend and liked by all who knew him. During his last illness he was faithfully and affectionately attended by his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Edward Alling, who has the sympathy of the community. Mr. William Alling departed this life October 15, 1892, aged 75 years and 21 days.

Allamond in Lake Providence Cemetery
Allamond, Albert Oct. 20, 1892 - Feb. 02, 1931 La PVT-Co D 148 MG-BN-WW I
Allamond, Ella F. April 10, 1982 CFH Records
Allamond, Robert NO MARKER

Allamond / Alamond, Jessye [see Griffin, Anderson Andrew]

Almand, Marion
1929 ECHO: Marion was a junior at East Carroll Parish High School in 1929. 1920 CENSUS OF E.C., LA.: Marion was born in 1915. His father was Claude F. Almand, a Baptist minister, was born @1874. His mother was named Clara Pearl Alamand. She was born @1879. His brothers names in the 1920 Census were Charles F.; @1903, Raymond; 1906, and Haddon; @1910. There were no sisters. In the 1930 Census of E. C., La. shows Haddon (20), a salesclerk in a grocery store. Charles F. Almand and Raymond Almand are no longer living at home.

Almond, C. A.
CHURCHES: FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AT L.P.; In 1918 C. A. Almond was listed as one of the pastors for the 1st Baptist Church at Lake Providence. [Info. 1977]

Alsbrooks, William C.
"William C. Alsbrooks deeds to, by donation, School Directors-William Cook, Peter W. L. Longmire, William Carnahan, lot of land situated in N portion of the NE 1/4 of sec. 27, T23, NR10E; containing one acre on which the schoolhouse now stands." Date, February 27, 1862. "Between the Rivers", McKoin. [See also West Carroll Parish, LA. info]
On February 27, 1862 William C. Alsbrooks donated land in NE1/4 of Section 27, Township NR10E, [In the 4th Ward of West Carroll] containing one acre on which the school house now stands. [old Notarial Book C., page 85 and 86]

Alsbrooks, William M.
Please add William M Alsobrook to the list of Civil War Casualties.
He died in Vicksburg on Christmas Day (Dec. 25), 1862. From Robert Sage:
Vet. Name: William M. Alsobrook, Widow's name: Ann Alsobrook
Co. A, Regiment 31, Division LA. He died of illness in 1862. Widow's application 7/13/1892 Also, from "Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers & Confederate Commands". New Orleans, LA:, 1920, Vol. 1, p. 53. --- Alsobrook, William M., Private, Company A. 31st La. Infantry En. Monroe, La., April 12th, 1862.
From Robert Sage, descendant of Ann's sister, Susan (Snow) Sage, "I found a book Arkansas Confederate Veterans and Widows Pension Applications by Francis T. Ingmire [an index]. For Sevier County: Veteran's name, William M. Alsobrook; widow's name, Ann Alsobrook. William was in A company, Regiment 31, LA, Division, 1862-1862 . He died of Illness 12/25/1862. Ann submitted her pension 7/13/1892."
In 1891 Arkansas began granting pensions to indigent Confederate veterans, Ann applied in 1892 as stated and, according to the papers sent by the Arkansas History commission, she was allowed a $50 pension on March 11, 1901 by the Pension Board for Sevier County. On the application paperwork filled out by the Pensions Board, it states she is incapacitated for manual labor by reason of Nervous Prostration. [Extreme exhaustion from inability to control physical and mental activities] and it is dated June 20, 1892.
On the Proof of Service form, signed by the Sevier County, Arkansas Justice of the Peace, J.M. Baker, it has that Ann Alsobrook, widow of William M. Alsobrook, is incapacitated for manual labor by reason of "old age".
In an unsigned letter from Oak Grove, La dated simply 4-28 (I assume of 1892). "Mrs. Ann Alsobrook, I received your letter. Some time since tryed (sic) to obtain all the information that you needed in your case. I saw several of our company . I saw John Riding McKee and Jack Lester, all that they could recollect was that your husband did belong to our company & that he died. Could not tell the day of his death nor the day that we were mustered in to service. I think that that (sic) we were mustered in to Service in May or June 1862 and that your husband died in Dec 1862 at Vicksburg Miss. Sorry that I am not able to give you all the information that you need. Our Company was Company A 31 LA Regiment Rps (or Bps?) Andrew Jackson."
You'll find him listed as William S. Alsobrook in the 1860 Census. The S is apparently wrong because all other references to a middle initial have been "M".
ABSTRACTS: Dec. 01, 1866 - Married. Sage~Sanders. On Thursday, the 1st of Nov., by the Rev. Wm. Keller, Rev. Thomas J. Sage to Mrs. Susan Sanders, all of Carroll Parish, La.. Sanders was her first husband's name. Her maiden name was Snow. If you had anything on John C. Snow, her brother, that'd be great. But I think he was in a neighboring Parish.
Fact is, there's a whole nest of family there at one time. Snows tied into the Alsobrooks by marriage before coming there as a group. Ann Snow married William M. Alsobrook. They moved to Carroll Parish by 1860 and at least two of Ann's siblings had moved there, too. They all came from Dyer County, Tennessee. (1850 Census)
[See Also GALLOWAYS]
TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 10, 1866
The Police Jury met pursuant to adjournment; present as on last evening. Be it ordained by the Police Jury, that hereafter the School Districts and the lines and bounds thereof in and for the parish of Carroll, be and are hereby established to be the same as the Police Jury Wards in and for said parish; District Number 1 to be bound the same as Ward 1, and the other districts to be bound the same as the other Wards; and that the following gentlemen be and they are hereby appointed School Directors in and for said parish, to wit; District No. 1, Henry Goodrich, William Craig, and Mark Valentine, Sr.; District 2, S. P. Bernard, G. W. McCarrell, and Ed. F. Newman; District No. 3, William Coleman, Aaron Garza, and Will S. Owen; District No. 4, F. D. Galloway, Samuel Templeton, and S. L. Chambliss; District No. 5, J. W. Bell, P. W. Longmire, and J. A. Mercer; District No. 6, William Keller, J. W. Dunn, and E. D. Hannegan; District No. 7, D. M. Pugh, H. W. McLemore, and Warren M. Scott.
That James Irwin be and he is hereby appointed overseer of the road from G. R. Newman's upper line, to Mrs. M. Galloway's lower line, and to control for road purposes the hands on the Bell place and the Rolla place.
That C. M. McCleod be and he is hereby appointed overseer of the road from Mrs. Galloway's lower line to Goodrich's Store; and to control for road purposes the hands on Mrs. Savage's place and the hands on the Galloway place.
April 25, 1868 ~ DIED ~ On the 3rd inst., at the "Edgewood Plantation", Mrs. Martha Galloway, aged 68 years. From: Carroll Record newspaper {AD}

Alston in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Alston, Annie Deloney 1861 - 1941
Alston, William Kennedy Died Sept. 19, 1905

Alston, Annie (Delony) Mrs. Annie Deloney was the Historian of the Edward Sparrow Chapter of U. D. C., of Lake Providence, LA.

Amacker in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Amacker, Alice Dutton 9-12-1996 C
Amacker, Amos Kent 1866 - 1918
Amacker, Amos Kent, Jr. Nov. 23, 1900 - April 21, 1960
Amacker, David Muir Feb. 26, 1897 - Nov. 02, 1985 "Professor"
Amacker, Donald Chalmer 1905 - 1906
Amacker, Elizabeth Muir June 01, 1871 - Oct. 27, 1949
Amacker, Jane of O'Hare's Switch--now Roosevelt.) The Amos Kent Amakers and Mrs. Muir lived here until 1906, when they and Colonel Nicholson moved to Lake Providence. Major Amacker continued to raise cotton on Way-a-Way Plantation near town and he also grew rice with Mr. Nicholson at Cottonwood Plantation.(see also Nicholsons and Muirs)

Amacker, Amos Kent
BIOS: In 1869, Mr. & Mrs. David Muir and her brother , Mr. Robert Nicholson, and sister, Miss Elizabeth Nicholson, acquired and developed the plantations of Fairview and Carondelet on the river. They used the tenant system (of farming on "fourths" or "Halves"), as was customary after the Civil War. Frequent Mississippi River overflows nearly ruined their farming interest eroded their land holdings. In 1902, the family bought the Stone's place five miles west and built a home there. (More exactly, this location was three miles south of Stamboul where Mr. Leo Shields lived and one-half mile west of O'Hare's Switch--now Roosevelt.) The Amos Kent Amakers and Mrs. Muir lived here until 1906, when they and Colonel Nicholson moved to Lake Providence. Major Amacker continued to raise cotton on Way-a-Way Plantation near town and he also grew rice with Mr. Nicholson at Cottonwood Plantation.

Amacker, Amos K (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members. Mrs. C. R. Brown was the first President. Mrs. A. K. Amacker was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Amacker, Alice (see Amacker, Mrs. Robert)
Alice, Roberts Amacker’s wife, was Director of the Dept. of Public Welfare.
CLUBS; PERFORMING ARTS: The Providence Players is a group of theatrically inclined citizens met in February, 1974, to gratify the needs for the performing arts. The Providence Players in 1976 had 40 members and 50 patron or season ticket subscribers. Charter members making up the Board were Peggy Madden, Dr. Bernard Waxman, William Gore, Kelly Salemi, Margaret Barham, Alice Amacker, Pat Taylor and Gracie Salemi. This group has presented four plays at the L. P. H. S. in the past two years.” [1977] From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Amacker, David
At the Versailles Peace Conference of 1919 held in Paris, David Amacker served as an interpreter for Messrs. Venizelos of Greece and Kramar of Czechoslovakia, translating from English into French for them.
Stephen Bonsal in his book Unfinished Business (1944) accurately records those meeting. Bonsal commends David Amacker and his work: "Again (after the first appointee proved flustered and incapable) I dived deep down into the language pool of the American delegation and fished out a young Lieutenant from Louisiana, who spoke clear French and also the pleasing English of the Deep South. He was drafted to the job in which he acquitted himself well. He was not at all awe-stricken by his close association of the representatives of the shattered monarchies of Europe, or with the outstanding new men of the budding democracies."
David Amacker attended Mississippi College and Princeton University. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, and graduated in 1922. He majored primarily in French and German. Later he taught at Culver Military Academy, Dartmouth University, Louisiana Tech, again at Dartmouth University, and finally at Southwestern University in Memphis, where he was a Professor of Political Science. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Amacker, Margaret [see Robert Amacker]

Amacker, Mary Muir [see Amos Kent Amacker]

Amacker, Robert N.
Robert Amacker, second son of the Amos Kent Amacker, was named Louisiana's Ginner of the Year by the Louisiana-Mississippi Cotton Ginners Association in 1965. A native of Lake Providence, he received his schooling at Lake Providence and at the University of AR. The Amackers bought the Hollybrook Grain Elevator in 1963 and Robert served as the President. This elevator has a capacity of 20,000 bushels of seed. Associated with Robert in the Hollybrook Gin Company, from time to time, were his uncle Robert Nicholson, A. P. Surles, Tate Lawrence and W. G. Wyly. The gin would turn out 400 bales of cotton in 22 hours.
Mr. Amacker and his wife, the former Alice Dutton, have three daughters, Margaret, Alice Ellen and Mary Muir, and two sons, Robert Jr., and Amos Kent (Major). A nephew, Kent Amacker, made his home with them after his parents died in 1957. Alice, Roberts’s wife, was Director of the Dept. of Public Welfare. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
BLACK CHURCHES; MT. ZION BAPTIST CHURCH: It was first located at Holly brook , organized it the 1800’s. Twice destroyed by storms it was finally rebuilt on land owned by Mr. R. N. Amacker just south of Hollybrook. C.R. Redman is the present minister.[1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Ameringer, Oscar
During the Great Depression of 1929-1930 a communal farming colony was formed at Transylvania by Mr. Oscar Ameringer known as Garden Home, located on a 4 acres site donated by the Garden Home School. He was a noted lecturer and journalist who presided over the Garden Home community. A fall in the price of cotton in 1937 after the Supreme Court invalidated the Agricultural Adjustment Act, cause the collapse of the Ameringer experiment. Individual farm ownership again took over in that area. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY: “If You Don’t Weaken”, by Oscar Ameringer.

Amerson, Mr.
Mr. Amerson was listed as one of the lawyers serving in the parish. It shows that he first appeared in court records in the year 1838. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Amos, Eva Blanche (see also Brock, Joseph Lawrence)

Anderson in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Anderson, A. J. "Andy"; Aug. 14, 1880 - June 28, 1930
DM W/ Ida V. Creech Anderson, married June 23, 1901
Anderson, Ida V. Creech "Vick"; Jan. 19, 1882 - Jan. 11, 1961
DM W/A. J. Anderson, married June 23, 1901
Anderson, Nathan Clifford May 10, 1845 - Oct. 11, 1846 Son of Robert & Amy Anderson
Anderson, Robert K. [Died @ Oct. 20, 1891 "Captain"; newspaper]
Anderson, Robert March 23, 1797 - Aug. 09, 1855 Born in Livingston Co., VT.
died in Hinds Co., MS.

Anderson, Ace“Leon LeFevre says his parents were living near Floyd at the time, and he heard his mother say that the Yankees, five or six white men, plus about 200 Negroes, crossed the Macon at Poverty Point and started toward Floyd. A runner on horseback cut through the woods and notified the town. Most of the men had gone fishing that day so Ace Anderson decided the best thing to do would be to try to turn them back. He knew that colored people took orders automatically from a white person, and he counted on influencing them. To the horror of his wife, he rode out alone to meet the invaders and met them just south of Floyd, the Negroes in front and the white officers to the rear. He, Mr. Anderson, raised his hands signaling a halt, which was obeyed. He told them the town knew of their coming and had barricaded themselves in stores and houses around the court house with the intention of mowing them down as they came in. He was warning them as he hated to see needless bloodshed. He said the “Home Guard,” including the guerrillas were on duty. This did it, the Negroes turned back and the white men followed. This perhaps was one attempt to raid Floyd, but not the last.” From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin
Mr. LeFevre worked in Ace Anderson's saloon making $12 per month. From “Between the Rivers”, McKoin
“William Pitt Kellogg, a colored man under the domination of northern Yankees, was elected governor of the state in 1872. He had vast appointive powers, in fact, he appointed at will, men for offices. He appointed Jim Ridley, a native of Carroll Parish , living near Floyd, as representative for Carroll Parish at one time. He appointed Harrison Henson as magistrate for Ward 2, and Sheriff for Carroll Parish. Leon LeFevre said these colored appointees west of the Macon never served. Magistrate Henson came to Floyd to hold court one day. After Ace Anderson held a conference with him, he departed without holding court and never returned in the capacity of magistrate again. “ Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Anderson, Bruce D.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was Bruce D. Anderson. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Anderson, Emma [See Hider, Arthur]

Anderson, Johnnie
"In Floyd there were seven saloons on Main Street, according to Mr. Lefevre. There was much drinking and no man left his home without his gun. Johnnie Anderson was shot down on the streets on night after he had escorted Miss Estelle Hedrick to church. It seems everyone knew who did the killing, but no one came to trial even thought the Anderson family was among the best families in the town." "Between the Rivers", McKoin.

Anderson, M.
PLANTATIONS; WADDILL: Luther M. Langford sold this plantation to M. Anderson. Land grants to soldiers of 160 acres of this place were made by an Act to “raise an additional military force”, at a sheriff’s sale in 1854. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Anderson, Marie (see Clement, T. I.)

Anderson, Pamela Jane (Jackson)[see Anderson, Walter T. C.]

Anderson, Robert K. "Capt."
CLERK OF COURT; 1873: Robert K. Anderson “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
ASSESSORS; 1878: David L. Morgan. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPER: We give below as short sketch of the life of this gentleman, who died last Tuesday week at the residence of Mr. P. D. Quays, [his half bro.-in-law] at Brunette, LA..
He was born at Meadville, Franklin County, Mississippi, March 1, 1842 Hi father was a native of Vermont, his mother a native of South Carolina.
He came with his parents Judge Robert Anderson and Mrs. Amy Anderson, to Carroll Parish about 1846. He was educated at home. His father died at Coopers Well, Miss., in 1855, and his mother died at Marshall, Tex. in 1863.
He enlisted at the age of 19 in the "Carroll Rebels" Capt. Ed Coleman commanding. He was elected Second Junior Lieutenant of the company, was attached to the Fourth Louisiana Battalion under Col. John McEnery, Of Monroe--army of Virginia. He resigned, came home and went out as an independent in Col. H. R. Lott's Cavalry--army of Tennessee. He was taken sick with camp fever, started home, was taken a prisoner and carried to Memphis, Tenn. He was paroled and went to Tyler, Texas via Mexico, where he joined Bown's Regiment of Texas troops. He returned to Carroll Parish in 1866, where he merchandised and planted with varying success for a few years, when he sold out his mercantile interest.
He was a Republican in politics, and filled many responsible positions.
His father was a native of Vermont, his mother a native of South Carolina. He was in poor health for over two years previous to his death, and up to the time of his demise was virtually confined to his room since last December. NOT SURE OF DATE

Anderson, Sheldon (Optometrist)
PHYSICIANS IN EAST CARROLL; Mentioned in old newspapers: Listed as a recent physician (Optometrist) [Info 1977] is Dr. Sheldon Anderson, succeeding Dr. Carl A. Kelly. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Anderson, Walter T. C.
MASONIC LODGES: Monticello Lodge Number 92 Records, dated Sept. 1, 1866 show the following "Walter T. C. Anderson and wife, Pamela Jane Jackson, in consideration of his great desire to promote the cause of Masonry and morality throughout the land and for the general good of the community, has given and grated forever unto Hewett J. Drew, master, and Walter T. C. Anderson, Secretary, and Littlebray J. Land, junior Warden of the Masonic Lodge known as Monticello Lodge No. 92, and to their successors in office... a parcel of land situated in the town of Floyd...." “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Anderson, Ward
EDUCATION; SUPERINTENDENTS: In 1912, G. A. Dutton became both superintendent and High School principal and was followed in 1914 by Ward Anderson in both positions. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.“

Andrews in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Andrews, Irene Millikin June 06, 1887 - Jan. 21, 1965
Andrews, Mattie Harlan Dec. 3, 1888 - Oct. 31, 1951 MOTHER

Andrews, James
On May 17, 1870 Governor H. C. Warmoth appointed a commission that selected the courthouse site consisting of Edward Sparrow, Thomas Rhodes, and James Andrews.

Anglin, W. D.
EDUCATION: In 1946 W. D. Anglin was on the School Board. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Arbuthnot, Ola Gordon [see Cain, Frank Arbuthnot]

Archibald, Josephine
She was married to John C. Bass in 1877, and together they had 7 children: Mabrey, Eddie M., John, Issac, Joseph, Rebecca, and Turner. He was appointed sheriff of East Carroll Parish in 1885 and again in 1888, filling that position with great credit to himself and everyone. John C. & Josephine Bass were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [See also John C. Bass]

Armstrong in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Armstrong, Alex Mar. 4, 1907, age 35 DM W/Elbert Armstrong
Armstrong, Alex April 30, 1883 (^1903) age 70
Armstrong, Elbert Sept. 24, 1919, age 39 DM W/Alex Armstrong
Armstrong, Eric Feb. 25, 1977 NPM age 77 yrs., 4 months, 0 days, Negro
Armstrong, Ida C. Nov. 26, 1938
Armstrong, Leticia 1848 - 1929

Armstrong, Alex L.
HEALTH UNIT: A local Board of Health was created in 1876. A. Armstrong served on the Board that year.
MMMBOOK: Issue of July 30, 1887: THE COLORED REPUBLICAN IN COUNCIL. At the request of the President of the Executive Committee, the leading colored men of the parish met this day, July 27, 1887, at North Star Baptist Church, and considered at length what should be done by the Colored Republicans of the parish, that their political status might be better established and maintained. The chairmen appointed on said committee: Rev. Alex Armstrong

Armstrong, Frank
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: The Eureka B. B. C. Mr. W. M. Abbott, the light and airy Deputy Clerk of Carroll, was chosen to look after the money as Treasurer, and Mr. Charles Sweet, Captain of the Field; with Hugh Leddy, Lieutenant. The following are the playing nine, who are to immortalize themselves this season; Charles Sweet, Catcher; Hugh Leddy, pitcher; Frank Armstrong, first base; Frank Leddy, second base; Thomas Leddy, third base; Eugene Leddy, short stop; James Dunn, left field; Abbe Richard, centre field; J. J. Stanfill, right field.

Armstrong, Jerry
BLACK CHURCHES; CENTRAL BAPTIST NO. 2: Organized in 1935 and located at the corner of Artaud and First Streets, under the leadership of L. L. Virgil. One of the trustees at the time of organization was Jerry Armstrong. The 1st pastor was Alex Strong, a Civil War veteran. A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Arnold in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Arnold, Willie 06/06/1994 - 06/09/1994 C

Arnold, Edna
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR: Meeting in Pecan Grove Lodge Hall on Sept. 26, 1907, for the purpose of organizing an Easter Star. The chapter was constituted as Providence Chapter Number 42. Edna was one of the Worthy Matrons of this order.

Artano in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Artano, Alma E. July 10, 1869 - July 7, 1907 "wife of Frank E. Artrand"

Artaud, Dr.Frank
NEWSPAPER; AUGUST 1899: The E. C. Medical Association met on the 7th inst., at the office of Bernard & Artaud. Dr. Artaud was elected as a regular, and Dr. Wyly as an honorary member.
He had gentlemanly qualities and dignified bearings. Dr. Artaud was a graduate of the Charity Hospital, of New Orleans. He served four years as Assistant Surgeon in the U. S. Soldiers Home in Washington City. He came to East Carroll Parish in July 1889 and went into partnership with Dr. F. R. Bernard. They did as much practice as they could possibly have attended to. He always had a warm heart for the poor and the afflicted.
NEWSPAPER; EAST CARROLL TOURNAMENT: Nov. 2, 1889. The Tournament: Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the Knights who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. The knights, headed by Dr. Artaud, grand marshal of the day, marched up to the grand stand.” … At noon precisely the sixteen Knights, escorted by Grand Marshal Dr. Frank E. Artaud, left town for Arlington accompanied by a large concourse of our citizens. “Carroll Democrat Newspaper”
PHYSICIANS LISTED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1880 - 1889; Dr. Frank Artaud was house surgeon to Barnes Hospital, Washington, D. C.
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: A diphtheria epidemic broke out in 1902, the town was divided into 5 sections, with Dr. Artaud in charge of one of the sections. Cholera was also a problem the same year. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
LeRACONTEUR: Apr. 18, 1891 - Cards are announcing the coming nuptials of Dr. F. E. Artaud and Miss Alma Eastland Egelly. The ceremony will take place on Wed., Apr. 22, at 8 o'clock p.m. The Rev. Mr. Hart will officiate. Then Dr. and Mrs. Artaud located to Greenville, Miss.
He had gentlemanly qualities and dignified bearings. As we stated almost two years ago, Dr. Artaud is a graduate of the Charity Hospital, of New Orleans. He served four years as Assistant Surgeon in the U. S. Soldiers Home in Washington City. He came here in July 1889 and went into partnership with Dr. F. R. Bernard. Since that time they have been doing as much practice as they could possibly attend to. He has always had a warm heart for the poor and the afflicted.

Asberry, John
John was born April 1, 1880 and died April 3, 1964. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
BIOGRAPHIES: “John Asberry, a Negro, served as a Justice of the Peace and in 1877 he became the Sheriff of East Carroll Parish. He was elected sheriff of E. Carroll in 1880 also. His area as Justice of the Peace was Ward 4.” [another place in the book says 1879 was when he became sheriff] He served in this office until 1884.
RECONSTRUCTION; POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: Some of the Black office holders included David Jackson, Clerk of Court; Charles Hicks, Sheriff; John Asberry, Coroner; Ed Jackson, Record; and J. Ed Burton, Registrar of Voters. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “In 1895 on the Republican Executive Committee were M. E. Massee from Ward 3 and John Asberry from Ward 4, a brother of Isham Asberry. W. M. Jennifer, Principal, published The Carroll Banner in 1890 with Reverend S. Martin as associated editor in 1892.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: A 1873 issue: “John Asberry, Coroner and R. K. Henderson, State tax Collector.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS: THE TRUE REPUBLICAN; Abstracts from the Sept. 9, 1876 issue. Parish Executive Committee lists John Ashberry as a member.
April 6, 1875 Police Jury Meeting pays John Asberry, coroner, for holding inquest, $30.00.
NEWSPAPER: LAKE VIEW LODGE, NO. 18. Colored K. of P.
On Friday night last the 25th inst, the above named Lodge of Colored Pythians assembled for the purpose of publicly installing their officers elected for the ensuing term. John Asberry was one of several officials elected; Asberry, Prelate.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1879: John Asberry. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
EFFECTS OF RECONSTRUCTION: Republicans remained a sizable force in state politics until the turn of the century, they were voted out of office almost immediately in Carroll. In 1882, Congressional candidate W. L. McMillan, a moderate Republican, only received 4 votes. The black-white coalition survived a little longer, for John Asberry, a black man, was elected sheriff in 1880.” From “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPER: Sept. 1886; The campaign committee appointed by the chairman of the Railroad Association of the parish of East Carroll consists of the following:
4th Ward-- E. R. Beeman, John Asberry, and P. D. Quays.
MMMBOOK: Issue of July 30, 1887: THE COLORED REPUBLICAN IN COUNCIL. At the request of the President of the Executive Committee, the leading colored men of the parish met this day, July 27, 1887, at North Star Baptist Church, and considered at length what should be done by the Colored Republicans of the parish, that their political status might be better established and maintained. The chairmen appointed on said committee: John Asberry

Asberry, Isham
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “In 1895 on the Republican Executive Committee were M. E. Massee from Ward 3 and John Asberry from Ward 4, a brother of Isham Asberry. W. M. Jennifer, Principal, published The Carroll Banner in 1890 with Reverend S. Martin as associated editor in 1892.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Aschaffenburg family
The Aschaffenburgs, along with other migrant German families originally settled in the area 12 miles south of Lake Providence (on Hwy 65) known as Alsatia, LA.
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, ALSATIA:
Originally settled by the Dryfusses, the Aschaffenburgs, and other migrant German families. The raising of race horses by Lensing, Inc. is the chief activity, other than farming. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Ashbridges in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Ashbridge, Alex M. Captain - Co. K 15 Louisiana Infantry - CSA
Ashbridge, Arrol Feb. 21, 1880 - Dec. 06, 1965
Ashbridge, Edith Nov. 07, 1869 - June 28, 1952
Ashbridge, Kate (see Voelker, Kate Ashbridge)

Ashbridge, Alexander Mitchell
Captain Ashbridge was by profession a druggist, and thoroughly educated in his calling. Prior to the war he had lived in the city of New Orleans, where his proficiency was recognized, and his services were always in demand.
At the very beginning of the war, he volunteered as a confederate soldier. Commencing as a private, he arose by his efficiency to the rank of Captain.
His company was attached to the 15th Louisiana Regiment, and was in the command of the immortal Stonewall Jackson till the death of that heronscientious in his transactions, and faithful to his duty, whosoever it might be. He was a brave soldier, loved by his comrades and fearless of any peril which the life might bring. No better man, no better citizen, no better husband and father than Capt. Ashbridge lives in our community.
NEWSPAPER SEPT. 1890 Died.--Last Mon. Captain A. M. Ashbridge departed this life at his home on the Arlington estate in this parish. Following so soon upon the untimely taking off of his last son, the lamented Eddie, his death is peculiarly distressing. A good man has gone; the community mourns the loss of a most worthy citizen; and his family, a devoted and affectionate husband and father.
Captain Ashbridge was by profession a druggist. Prior to the war he had lived in the city of New Orleans. He volunteered as a confederate soldier. Commencing as a private, he arose by his efficiency to the rank of Captain.
His company was attached to the 15th Louisiana Regiment, and was in the command of the immortal Stonewall Jackson. He was in the Pennsylvania campaign, and took part in the Battle of Gettysburg. After that he obtained a sick leave of absence, and went to Georgia to recuperate. There he met Miss Fannie Sparrow, the accomplished daughter of General Edward Sparrow, the Confederate States Senator from Louisiana, and chairman of the military committee. He sought and won her heart; and in 1864, they married and lived in the Ashbridge House on the grounds at Arlington Plantation. He subsequently removed with his family to this parish, in the year 1873, where he has since lived. Captain Ashbridge was an honest and upright man. He was conscientious in his transactions, and faithful to his duty, whosoever it might be. (The Ashbridges were Voelker ancestors) “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Ashbridge, Edward S.
The lamented Edward Sparrow Ashbridge was the eldest son of Fannie and Alexander Ashbridge. Ed was a quiet inoffensive young man, esteemed and respected by all.
NEWSPAPER: In Aug. 1889 Edward Ashbridge was murdered on the Wilson Point Plantation.

Ashbridge Fannie (Sparrow) [See also, Mother, Sparrow, Fannie]
NOTES: There are 2 Fannie Ashbridges, mother and daughter.
NEWSPAPER: Daughter of Alexander Mitchell Asbridge and Fannie (Sparrow) Ashbridge:
Sad Tidings.--Last Tuesday morning, a telegram brought the sad news that Mr. T. B. Snodgrass, of Scottsboro, Ala., had died of typhoid fever. Several years ago, Mr. Snodgrass married Miss Fannie Ashbridge, oldest daughter of our esteemed fellow citizen, Captain A. M. Ashbridge. They went to Alabama where he had been engaged in business ever since. All here who knew him speak very highly of him, and we all say that “truly a good man has gone to rest”. We deeply sympathize with Mrs. Snodgrass.

Ashbridge, Katie
BIOS: Daughter of Alexander Mitchell and Fannie (Sparrow) Ashbridge. Katie was born Sept. 7, 1867. She married Clarence A. Voelker. They had a child they named Stephen Voelker. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1890 Married.--We congratulate Mr. C. A. Voelker and Miss Katie Ashbridge on their marriage, which took place last Wed. morning at the residence of the bride’s father, Captain A. M. Ashbridge. Mr. Voelker is a high toned, steady young man, and Miss Katie will make him a loving and useful partner through life. Good luck, peace and prosperity are our wishes for them as long as they live. Katie died in 1944. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Atherton in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Atherton, Caroline (see Keene, Caroline Atherton Bynum)

Atlas, Clora
A midwife by trade, did not lose any babies that she delivered during the course of her practice. Was said to have been en route to her home after delivering a baby when struck by two cars. First pedestrian casualty of an automobile accident in East Carroll Parish. “Find A Grave” website.

Atlas, Andrew
MMM BOOK: Issue of April 9, 1875; The Police Jury met pursuant to adjournment. All present as on yesterday. Minutes were read and approved. The following claims were then allowed by the Committee on Claims: Andrew Atlas, special Constable, $7.50

Atlas, John
MMMBOOK: Issue of July 30, 1887: THE COLORED REPUBLICAN IN COUNCIL. At the request of the President of the Executive Committee, the leading colored men of the parish met this day, July 27, 1887, at North Star Baptist Church, and considered at length what should be done by the Colored Republicans of the parish, that their political status might be better established and maintained. Thereupon the following person came forward and signed said resolutions: John Atlas

Atlas, King Jr.
MMM BOOK: Issue on September 19, 1868; At the Democratic Barbecue it listed King Atlas, Jr. as one of the secretaries for the Democratic Party.

Atlas, King Sr.
MMM BOOK: October 22, 1892; There is another of our colored friends named King Atlas, and industrious, clever, responsible citizen, who tells us he has an excellent crop this year, he is not only King by name but he is a King among cotton growers. Atlas is one of quite a large working family of negroes born and raised in old Carroll, who enjoy the full confidence of the white people who know them, and it affords us much pleasure to make mention of such thrifty well behaved citizens; and what is better we can safely say, that we have lots of the same kind in this our parish of East Carroll.

Atlas, William
MMM BOOK: Issue of April 9, 1875; The Police Jury met pursuant to adjournment. All present as on yesterday. Minutes were read and approved. The following claims were then allowed by the Committee on Claims: William Atlas, special Constable, $7.50

Aulds, Ira
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Aultman in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Aultman, Bertha Lena March 10, 1910 - Oct. 03, 1979
Aultman, Charles Edward Fe. 14, 1886 - Nov, 09, 1969
Aultman, Ruby April 04, 1911 - Oct. 08, 1938

Austin, Sterling T.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of L. P., La. from 1835 to 1976 was Sterling T. Austin in 1878. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PARISH JUDGE: 1879: Sterling Austin. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Avery, Henry
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF LAKE PROVIDENCE: The La. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South sent Henry Avery Providence in January 1847 as a minister. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Aycock, L. R. (Father)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: In 1945 Father L. R. Aycock came to St. Patricks' Church. At this time a new brick school was built. He remained until 1947. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Babb, Fletcher Alton
HIS STORY - FLETCHER ALTON BABB:
Fletcher was born in Marianna, AR. In 1905. His parents were Lee Herring and Thomas Jefferson Babb, both were born in Byhalia, MS. His mother was a teacher and his father was first a teacher and then a carpenter and contractor. He had one year of high school. He worked on the farm to help support the family. HE enlisted in the army in 1926. His mother died soon after his military service. He went to work for his brother-in-law on his farm. He started picking cotton, earning $2 a day, or $1 per hundred pounds, plus $1 a bale for weighing. Mr. Ben Erwin was in charge at that time. After not being able to save any money he teamed up with another migrant cotton-picker to trap coons and minks which they sold to Pop Razer. He left for Memphis in Jan. 1931 and had various jobs; accounting through the tax season, worked in a coal mine, in the wheat fields, as a dishwasher, and a clerk in several hotels. He gathered up a work crew to come and pick cotton here by request of Mr. Ben Erwin. He worked for Mr. Tib Mitchiner and Ed Voelker and was in charge of the pickers and payrolls. Afterwards kept books and managed the store on Olivedell Plantation. Babb succeeded C. J. Wyly‘s position, as clerk of the Police Jury, upon his death in 1932. He later entered real estate and insurance business. The Alluvial Lands Co. was an outgrowth of these interests. He is a member of the Board of the Methodist Church, . He is treasure of the Louisiana Christian Ashram. Both he and his wife Sadie (ne Hammack) are active members. They have 5 daughters and a son. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for the 1964-65 term was F. Alton Babb. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Babb, Sadie
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Sadie Babb is the mother of six. She was a bookkeeper and treasurer of the Methodist Church. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members. Mrs. C. R. Brown was the first President. Mrs. F. A. Babb was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Babbitt, Julia M.
PLANTATIONS; HAGAMAN: Louise Hagaman owned Hagaman from 1856 until 1873 when she sold it to Julia M. Babbitt in exchange for certain hotel property in Grand Junction, Iowa. The Babbitts were unable to meet the financial arrangement and “Hagaman Place” was recovered by Louise Hagaman. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bagbey in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bagbey, Aline S. March 09, 1890 - June 07, 1956
Bagbey, Dorothy Hamley April 08, 1920 - Nov. 15, 1967
Bagbey, Elmer Brooks Nov. 05, 1891 - Jan. 22, 1967

Bagbey, Thomas
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Mrs. Anna B. Sutton was employed as the Hospital Administrator in 1972, succeeded shortly after by Thomas Bagbey who still remains today. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Thomas Bagbey; Outside Guard. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic projects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bagley, Doctor
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1847: Dr. Bagley. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Baker in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Baker, INFANT Dec. 19, 1955
Baker, Michael David Dec. 02, 1957 - Aug. 13, 1965

Bain, Bess
4-H CLUB PROGRAM: “In Sept. 1954 Bess Bain was hired to work with the Youth Home Economics program.“ “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bailey, James E. Jr.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was James E. Bailey, Jr. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bailey, Pearce
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was donated by and built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. An even newer building built on Lake Street in 1926. Serving as a present vestryman is Pearce Baily Sidney Guenard George Fox James A. Federick Thayer McCoy H. Graham Schneider James L. Baur A. I. Guenard Dr. William A. Harris Harry Schneider, Jr. The present rector is Charles M. Seymour, Jr. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Baird, Judge
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament“. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds. One of the judges selected to determine the result of the tilting contest was Judge Baird of Morehouse Parish. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Baker, John
"October 10, 1835, John Baker sold to Alex Trappington a track of land and all improvements situated in Cypress Bayou, near Bayou Macon, with all improvements and quit claim deed, all rights, and duplicate receipts from the receivers of public monies at the land office in Monroe, price $1,000." "Between the Rivers" McKoin.

Baker, L. Wayne
MODERN BANKS; THE BANK OF DIXIE / THE LAKE PROVIDENCE BANK: The present Board of Directors of the Bank of Dixie consists of Dr. F. M. Terral, L. Wayne Baker, T. E. Hankins, Michael Lensing, H. H. Howington, Jr..“ [Info 1977] Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Baker, W. K.
EARLIEST BUSINESSES: Back in 1879-1880 , some of the business in the town of Lake Providence were the Undertaker, R. P. Jones, a Butcher, A. Durrell, a Druggist, Dr. J. L. Davis, and a Dentist, Dr. W. K. Baker. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Balfour, William L.
PLANTATIONS; LONGWOOD: Longwood was some 4 miles above town, bounded on the front by the MS. River, upper side by Vista Plantation, on the lower side by Hopewell Plantation, (J. W. Montgomery’s place) and in the rear by Eyrie (William Balfour’s place) and Roberdale Plantations. It’s 1st owner was George M. Long, next owner was Samuel Bond. “1,534 acres and 107 slaves, corn fodder, 40 mules, cattle, valued at $48,000“ to Joseph R. Parks. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; TYRONE: Located 4 miles west of town. Willson bought an additional tract of 300 acres from Z. H. Dorsey and Thomas Jefferson Collins which fronted on River Bayou and adjoined the plantation of William L. Balfour on one side and Govy Hood on the other. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Ball, W. H.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. One of the clergymen in this new church was W. H. Ball. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Ballard, Mack
After the Civil War, Mack Ballard purchased what today is known as the Griffin farm in the Unity Community from Lud Cawthorn. He built a house from good oak lumber and cypress. He hauled the lumber to the Matt Sanders sawmill northwest of the present site of Oak Grove, known then as Pin Hook. He had to haul logs for lumber about 25 or 30 miles by mule or ox team to the mill, and then haul the lumber back for the house by the same method. A part of the lumber, especially that used for flooring was planed by hand. This house is still standing today [1977], the oldest house found in Ward Two [West Carroll]. Jeff Griffin purchased the farm from his father-in-law, Mack Ballard. [see also Griffin, Jeff) "Between the Rivers", McKoin

Banks, Andrew [see Banks, Leandrew]

Banks, Gerturde Fields (Howard) [see Banks, Leandrew]

Banks, Fred
BLACK CHURCHES; MOUND CHAPEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: It is located some 2 miles west of Transylvania and was established in 1924 by the Rev. John Campbell and was pastor until his death in 1945. Fred Banks is present pastor. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Banks, Leandrew (see also Fields, Joseph)
Local descendants can trace their ancestry back to: Gertrude Fields Howard who married Leandrew Banks. Her parents were Joseph and Iscoy Walker Fields. His parents were Andrew and Mary Banks. Iscovy's parents were Nicholas and Killy Walker. There are numerous descendants, including great grandchildren Rosie Mary Banks Richardson and Willie Dorsey. Willie lives (in 1977) in Newellton, Louisiana. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Banks, Mary (see Banks, Leandrew)

Banks, Tillman
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bankston in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bankston, Joan (see Maben, Joan Bankston)

Barber family
COMMUNITIES OF THE PARISH, BUNCH‘S BEND:
“In the 1800’s Bunch’s Bend was the wealthiest and most extensively cultivated part of Carroll Parish. Some names of prominence was the Benton family, the Barbers of Erin Plantation, the Keys and Montgomerys of Afton Plantation, the McCullochs of Cottonwood Plantation, the Van Fossens of Elder Grove Plantation and the Williams. This area was greatly altered by the shifting channel of the Mississippi River which swept away much of the rich alluvial land.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Barber, Colonel
TELEGRAPH: It was a means of contact with the “outside” world and especially with Wall Street. Colonel Barber of Bunch’s Bend, in the pre-Civil War period, thought it of such importance as a means of keeping him informed on the cotton market, that he kept a horse saddled at all times, during the selling season, to ride “post haste” into L. P. to get the daily market report. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Barber, Leonard Kellogg
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1892: Leonard K. Barber. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Susan Rebecca Sentell, was the wife of Leonard Kellogg Barber. The Barbers lived on Erin Plantation until 1903, with their three children Mildred, Lucy and Sentell, and Mr. Barber became a practicing attorney in L. P.. The Barbers always had an open house. Bounteous meals, lively parties, hilarious entertainment were provided by the fun-loving Barbers. He called the dogs, male and female, Mr. & Mrs., wrote Lee’s birthday on the plastered wall of the study so the children would remember it; and kept a relay of horses to have a messenger ride into L. P. to the telegraph office at a moments notice to learn stock quotes. In his duties of looking after the plantation, and keeping a watchful eye on Leonard Watt, a relative who ran the commissary and looked after thing in general, he had a law office in L. P. and practiced in the 7th District court along with such prominent attorneys as Joseph E. Ransdell, Francis X. Ransdell, Chrles J. Wyly, and Clifton F. Davis. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Barber, Lucy
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Lucy was the daughter of Susan Rebecca Sentell and Leonard Kellogg Barber. Lucy Barber married Frank T. Constant, of Neponsett Plantation. Frank was wealthy and it is rumored that “he lighted his cigars with $5. bills”. His mother was Mary E. Keene Constant. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Barber, Mildred
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Mildred was the daughter of Susan Rebecca Sentell and Leonard Kellogg Barber. Miss Mildred Barber married and went to Bunkie, Louisiana to live. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Barber, Sentell
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Sentell Barber was the son of Susan Rebecca Sentell and Leonard Kellogg Barber. Sentell married Mildred Buck of Evergreen Plantation. While on their honeymoon, a member of a swimming party called for help, the young bridegroom rushed to the rescue and was drowned. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Barber, Susan Rebecca (Sentell)
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Susan Rebecca Sentell, daughter of George Washington Sentell and Mildred A. Dickson Sentell, was the wife of Leonard Kellogg Barber. Susan Barber purchased the Erin and Hope plantations and 1/5 interest in the Glen Mary Plantation for $13,125.00, from her mother after her father, George Sentell, died in 1896. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Barbour in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Barbour, Robert Fillmore Jan. 04, 1890 - April 03, 1893

Barbour, J. R.
“J. R. Barbour surveyed the Fauxbourg-Arlington addition in 1874.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Bard, Samuel (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1857: Dr. Samuel Bard. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Barham, Margaret
CLUBS; PERFORMING ARTS: The Providence Players is a group of theatrically inclined citizens met in February, 1974, to gratify the needs for the performing arts. The Providence Players in 1976 had 40 members and 50 patron or season ticket subscribers. Charter members making up the Board were Peggy Madden, Dr. Bernard Waxman, William Gore, Kelly Salemi, Margaret Barham, Alice Amacker, Pat Taylor and Gracie Salemi. This group has presented four plays at the L. P. H. S. in the past two years.” [1977] From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Barker in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Barker, Margaret (see Schneider, Margaret Barker)

Barker, Julius
1929 ECHO ~ "Happy fellow, everybody's friend; play football? And how?---Basketball too, the strong powerful brute." Football: '25, '26, '27, & '28. Basketball: '26, '27, '28, & '29.
1930 CENSUS: William C. and Lula D. Barker, parents. Older sister named Boletha Barker. Boletha and Julius was born in Tennessee. Father was born in Louisiana and Mother in Texas. Julius is working at a filling station, listed as a salesperson.

Barker, Harry O. (Father)
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: Between 1953 to 1969, Reverends were Bermel Dube, P. J. Murphy, and M. J. Tyrell. In 1969, Father Harry O. Barker, the present rector, came to St. Patrick’s Church. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Barker, Margaret
PLANTATIONS; LEWISTON: In the Bunch’s Bend area, Lewis Stowers purchased 978.4 acres in 1842 from George Irish (called it the Irish Place), and an additional purchase from Margaret Barker and Henry Carpenter brought the acreage to 1,866 acres, calling it Lewiston. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Barker, William
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Barnes in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Barnes, Carrie S., May (Mar.?)02, 1897 - Jan. 20, 1975 DM W/ Nicolas E. Barnes, Negro
Barnes, James C. Oct. 25, 1912 - Jan. 28, 1970, LA PFC CP E 565 Inf., WW II - Negro
Barnes, Maxine Ruby Dec. 20, 1923 - Feb. 04, 1941
Barnes, Nicholas 04/25/1895 - 12/31/1989 DM W/Carrie S. Barnes - Negro
Barnes, Sarah Jane (see Bratton, Sarah Jane Barnes)

Barnes, Jack
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. Jack Barnes also served as a pastor there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Barnett in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Barnett, Jesse L. April 15, 1893 - July 01, 1957
Barnett, Maybelle June 14, 1898 - March 04, 1979

Barrett in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Barrett, Carrie B. 1888 - 1954
Barrett, Emily Corrinne 1/19/1878 - 10/23/1907 wife of Rev. J. L. Barrett
Barrett, Mart Major Dec. 30, 1879 - Feb. 14, 1931

Barrett, Benny Tully
The American Legion Post #37, Powell-Martin-Barrett, was named for three WWI service men killed. The third was Benny Tully Barrett, Corporal, Infantry 359, who enlisted on Sept. 21, 1917, and was killed in action at St. Mihiel on Sept. 15, 1918. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Barrett, Harry
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, HENDERSON PROJECT:
One of the Federal Farm Security projects was established for black farmers. It was originally a part of the Henderson and Carondelet plantations. The Henderson project was established when aroused citizens resented the displacement of long-time resident Negroes when the Transylvania project formed for the whites. Most of these blacks had lived in the Transylvania area prior to the Civil War. The displaced was given first choice of the 78 units . About ½ of them have remained since 1940-41 when it began. Much of this land has been bought by Harry Barrett, C. L. Vining, Lee Johnson, Howard Wise and others. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Barrow, Miss Evelyn (see Cammack, Abner Sam Jr.)

Bartlett, Frank A. (Colonel - Confederate)
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1844: Mr. Bartlett. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: In desperation the governor [Moore] authorize the formation of the few remaining militia companies into battalians of partisan rangers for state service. These companies were combined to form the 13th Battalian, Partisan Rangers, under the command of Colonel Frank Bartlett. Colonel Frank A. Bartlett was headquartered in Delhi where he was in command of his 13th Battalian. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: On June 19th, 1863, Bartlett’s 13th LA. Regiment was reinforced with the 13th Texas Infantry (now about 900 men), set out for Providence to destroy the Negro camp of instruction, and to break up the plantation held by Federal agents and lessees as far down as Milliken’s Bend. He marched on Bunch’s Bend capturing the small Federal outpost there. Driving on around the lake he marched on Lake Providence. He encountered the 1st Kansas Mounted Infantry near Baxter Bayou, capturing 9 army wagons loaded with supplies and 36 mules. Then Bartlett headed on to Tensas Bayou, where found the bridge burned by the retreating Union enemy. He tried to rebuild the bridge but Union troops, headed by General Reid, were sent back, the heavy fire drove Colonel Bartlett back to Floyd.
[*NOTE: 300 Negro soldiers of the 8th Louisiana Volunteers, many of them the former slaves of Carroll, contributed to the Union victory at Tensas Bayou.] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: On June 22, 1863, General Walker left Delhi to go to Goodrich’s Landing on the MS. River. As he rode through the plantation region east of Bayou Macon he broke up the plantations that were held by Northern lessees and disloyal Southerners. On the 29th, Walker reached Mounds Plantation (10 miles south of L.P.), where a fort had been constructed on the largest Indian mound. It was garrisoned by Negro troops protecting the leased plantations. The Confederates surrounded the fort, and the 3 white union officers surrendered the garrison without a fight. Two companies of the 1st Arkansas Volunteers (of African descent), about 113 men, were taken prisoners.”
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: On July 5th General Walker crossed the Macon and marched on Ashton Plantation with orders to blockade the river, not knowing that the city of Vicksburg had fallen the day before. Walker reports “I am now engaged in burning all the cotton I can reach from L. P. to the lower end of Concordia Parish…”[see story elsewhere]. With General Walker’s departure, the only Confederate force left in the area was Colonel Frank Bartlett’s Partisan Rangers. “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: After the fall of Vicksburg, 1863, Grant ordered General Reid to Vicksburg, leaving behind two companies of Negro troops to garrison Carroll. On was posted at Providence and the other at Goodrich’s Landing. The Confederate force was being strengthened in northeast Louisiana, a band of Confederate guerillas from Missouri, under the command of Captain Joseph Lee, was ordered to the Macon Ridge to aid Colonel Bartlett in harassing the Union forces. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CARROLL SKIRMISHES IN 1864: In June 1864, Lee and Bartlett raided the area below Providence, seizing mules, horses, some of the Negroes on Union leased plantations. Some of the Yankee lessees were made prisoners, by the Southerners and carried as far away as Texas, while some Yankees swindled Negroes, and re-recruiters for the Union army took away many of the able bodied men for military duty.

Barton, David O. (Doctor)
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horace Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”
PLANTATIONS; POINT LOOK OUT: Martha Bass Watson then married Dr. David O. Barton and to them a daughter, Georgi Anna Barton, was born. Dr. Barton was wealthy in his own right, for at the time of his death he had in his possession ten or twelve $1,000 bills. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Barton, Georgi Anna [see Barton, David O. (Doctor)]

Barton, Martha (see Bass, Martha)
One of the Job Bass daughters. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Barwick in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Barwick, Ethel Oct. 18, 1872 - Mar. 01, 1890 Wife of R. J. E. Barwick

Bass in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bass, Abraham 1857 - 1945 DM W/Corrie A. Bass
Bass, Annie born Oct. 07, 1886 age 1 yr. 1 mth. 19 dys.
Bass, Baker Archibald, April 28, 1893 - Mar. 12, 1937, U.S. Army, Co H., 156 Inf.,WWI
Bass, Corrie A. 1877 - 1938 DM W/Abraham Bass
Bass, Edward Malissa (see Messick, Edward Malissa Bass)
Bass, Isaac Aug. 14, 1884 - Feb. 16, 1916
Bass, Frances (see Kilpatrick, Frances Bass)
Bass, John Cortex Sr. Aug. 27, 1843 - Feb. 28, 1917
Bass, John C. May 08, 1882 - Jan. 02, 1937
Bass, Josephine Nov. 27, 1855 - Feb. 02, 1924 "Mrs."
Bass, Mabry (see Hill, Mabry Bass)
Bass, Marguerite (see Williams, Marguerite Bass)
Bass, Marguerite Montgomery Jan 31, 1885 - March 29, 1978
Bass, McEnery Oct. 05, 1895 - Aug. 14, 1900 Son of J. C. & Josephine Bass
Bass, Minnie E. 08/12/1906 - 12/11/1988 CFH Records, wife of Tom Bass
Bass, Thomas E. Dec. 01, 1906 - Nov. 26, 1977 Sgt. US Army - WWII
Bass, Turner L. Oct. 19, 1890 - Dec. 31, 1922

Bass, Abraham
WAR’S END: “It was to a ravaged and bitter land that the weary veterans returned from the eastern battle fields. Maimed and scarred they came -- Thomas Scarborough, Charles Purdy, Ed Kleinpeter, and John Draughon; Charles DeFrance, C. R. Egelly, E. J. Delony, and J. S. Richards, Cyrus Hedrick, W. R. C. Lyons, J. D. Lott, and Mark Valentine, Jr., among others. The refugees returned from Texas; their desire - to build their lives and fortunes in peace. From the north came the paroled prisoners of war, including W. F. Pennington, John O’Brien, Abraham Bass, and V. M. Purdy. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Bass, E. L.
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. E. L. Bass also served as a pastor there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bass, Eddie (Miss)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1901 Miss Eddie Bass, Miss Carrie Byerly and Miss Elodie Brown were new teachers. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bass, James
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: In 1861 the Lake Providence Cadets military company was formed, the largest in the state with 120 members. Among those serving in the ranks were Matt Kingsley, James Bass, and J. Jamison. Elected officers in the company were Franc V. Whicher, Captain; W. F. Pennington, 1st Lieut; and D. C. Jenkins, Jr and C. R. Purdy, 2nd Lieuts. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Bass, Job
SETTLERS OF THE EARLY 1800’S:
“In the 1810 census was listed as the owner of Lookout Plantation, John L. Buck in 1826 owned Pecan Grove Plantation which he purchased from the U. S. government. Samuel Galloway, for whom Galloway Bayou is named, sold land in 1833 to William Henderson. John A. Love, a Methodist minister, in 1834 bought 726.66 acres at Patterson Point.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
PLANTATIONS; POINT LOOKOUT: “Located south of Providence was Point Look Out Plantation. The owners were Job Bass and his wife, Maria Richardson of the prominent Richardson family. One of the Job Bass daughters, Martha, became the second wife of Warren M. Benton [see Woodstock Plantation] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bass, John C. Sr.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1885: John C. Bass, Sr.. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
Born in Hinds Co. MS. on Aug. 27, 1843, the oldest of eight children, born to John and Melitia (Mabrey). The father moved to Mississippi about 1836, where he lived till 1847 and then moved to Louisiana, locating 1st to Madison and then in Ouachita Parish, where he made his home till his death in 1853. He was a modest planter, but owned considerable property in East Carroll Parish, La. Mr. Bass' father was Isaac Bass, a native of N. C., who was a member of one of the old families of that state. John C. was reared in Louisiana, and educated in Clinton College, MS.. During his attending college the war broke out, leaving in 1861 he volunteered in the Confederacy. He was enlisted in the 4th Battalion, Co. A., serving until Sept. 21, 1863. He participated in the Battle of Secessionville, in South Carolina and also at Chickamauga, where he received a severe wound, disabling him for further service. He returned home in 1865, where he was a teacher for awhile. He started merchandising and then planting, accumulating valuable real estate. He was married to Miss Josephine Archibald in 1877, and together they had 7 children: Mabrey, Eddie M., John, Issac, Joseph, Rebecca, and Turner. He was appointed sheriff of East Carroll Parish in 1885 and again in 1888, filling that position with great credit to himself and everyone. John C. & Josephine Bass were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was modest, unpretentious, and attained his prominence as a citizen of E. C. Parish. He was a staunch member of the Democratic Party and a Mason. He has always endeavored to be done as he wanted to have been done by. He passed away in 1920 at the age of seventy-six and Josephine in 1924, aged sixty-nine.
Information from "Bio. & Historical Memoirs of Louisiana", Goodspeed.

Bass, John C., Jr.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1920 and 1924: John C. Bass, Jr.. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
He was deputy sheriff of the parish from 1903 to 1912. From 1912 to 1920 he held the office of clerk of courts and in 1920 and again in 1924 was elected sheriff. Sheriff Bass was born on the Tyrone Plantation located four miles from the Town of Lake Providence on the north side of the lake, on May 8, 1882. His parents were John C. and Josephine (Archibald) Bass, now deceased, his father passing away in 1920 at the age of seventy-six and his mother in 1924, aged sixty-nine. John C. Bass was born in Hinds County, Mississippi, came to Louisiana when a young man and served eight years as sheriff of East Carroll Parish at first by appointment and then by election. He was also a member of the police jury and the Parish School Board and in education and character was well fitted for leadership in the affairs of the community. He had taught school when a young man, and as a Southern soldier fought for the cause of the South until finally as the result of repeated wounds was discharged on account of disability and for the rest of his life suffered the infirmities of a cripple. He was with a regiment of Louisiana troops in the battle of Chickamauga. He served as commander of the local post of the United Confederate Veterans and attended all reunions of his old comrades. For a number of years he was master of the local lodge of Masons, attended the Grand Lodge of that order and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Church. Though handicapped physically, he was very competent and expert in the management of business affairs. Two years before his death his eyesight failed completely. Of a family of five sons and five daughters, the only survivors are John C. and Baker A. The latter is a planter in East Carroll Parish. John C. Bass was educated in local schools and the University of the South at Kewanee, Tennessee, and after his college career took up the work of planting and pursued that occupation steadily until his first appointment as deputy sheriff. He owns the Roberta Plantation in Wards Three and Six. Mr. Bass enjoys such active recreation as hunting and he has a camp in the swamps of East Carroll. He married Miss Margaret / Marguerite Montgomery, daughter of Vail Montgomery. They have a daughter, Margaret. Mrs. Bass is a member of the Episcopal Church while he is a Methodist. He has served four consecutive years as master of the local Masonic fraternity and belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Monroe and the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Lake Providence. A History of Louisiana, (vol. 2), pp. 238-239, by Henry E. Chambers. Published by The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, 1925.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. J. C. Bass, Jr. was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
LAW; REGISTRAR OF VOTERS: Records of this office date back to 1917 when John C. Bass, Jr. served as Registrar. George F. Blackburn later held this office, followed by James Beard, who was succeeded by his wife, Myrtle Beard. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.”
CLERK OF COURT; 1912: John C. Bass, Jr. 9th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
LAW; THREE COURTHOUSES: On July 1, 1901, the old courthouse was replaced by a new building which was dedicated by Pecan Grove Lodge. The cornerstone bore the names of the involved Masons: Robert H. Cage, Grand Master of Louisiana; John C. Bass, Worshipful Master of the local lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Bass, John C. (Mrs.)
LAKE PROVIDENCE CEMETERY: Recent Secretary-Treasurer of the Cemetery Association, Mrs. John C. Bass, served for many years. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.”
NEWSPAPERS; The Carroll Watchman: In an 1875 issue: “Col. Francis M. Hays’ splendid new brick residence on Lake Street is in a fair way of completion, and will be the finest residence in Providence.“ [This is the present home of Mrs. John C. Bass.) [1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bass, Josephine (Archibald) [See also Bass, John C., Sr.]
A native of Louisiana. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. One of the officers was Mrs. Josephine Bass. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Bass, Lou Ella
Lou Ella was born in the 2nd Ward of East Carroll Parish, Louisiana, in Oct. 1883. Her mother was Emily Campbell. Emily was born in April 1867, to Henry and Emma Campbell, at Point Lookout, Louisiana. Lou Ella is shown to be mulatto on the 1910 E. C. Census. On the 1900 Census the Campbell family lived in the same area of Abe Bass, Jr., and I believe him to be Lou Ella's father. Other children of Emily's was Tim; born July 1888, Julius; born July 1894, and Ida; born Jan 1897. Lou had two sons listed on the 1910 Cenus; Willie, 8 yrs. old and Leon, 5 years old. A brother, Ned Wells, was shown to be living in the household of Lou Ella on the 1910 Census. He was 17 years old.

Bass, Marguerite (Montgomery) [see also or Mrs. John C. Bass]
EDUCATION: In 1900, Vail Montgomery deeded to Thomas J. Powell, President of the School Board, 25’ frontage on Lake Street for $200.. Mrs. John C. Bass (formerly Marguerite Montgomery), living next door to this site in 1977, recalls attending school “next door”, where Mrs. Evelyn Deal lived in 1977. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.“

Bass, Martha [see also Bass, Job and also Benton, Warren M.]
PLANTATIONS; POINT LOOK OUT: One of the Job Bass daughters, Martha, became the second wife of Warren M. Benton. Martha Bass had twice been widowed before her marriage to Warren Benton. Her first marriage to E. B. Watson produced no heirs. Martha Bass Watson then married Dr. David O. Barton and to them a daughter, Georgi Anna Barton, was born. Dr. Barton was wealthy in his own right, for at the time of his death he had in his possession ten or twelve $1,000 bills. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bass, Mary (Miss)
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: Listed as one of the 1921 teachers is Miss Mary Bass. “A Place to Remember”

Bass, Minnie B. (Erwin)
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Minnie Erwin Bass. She received a Silver Certificate on January 8, 1951 for her 25 year membership. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bassley, A. [Doctor]
Born @ 1823 in Virginia. His wife was Mariah J. from Kentucky. She was born @1828. One child living with them on the 1850 Census of Carroll Parish.

Bastrop, Baron De
The king of Spain awarded to Baron de Bastrop in the 1790’s a land grant of nearly 2 million acres, lying north and northeast of Fort Miro, Now Monore, for service to the crown. He became the first individual land owner, but never lived here. He began to parcel out his large land grant to individuals for settlements as permanent homes. We do find that he sold this part of his grant to General John Adair, who in turn sold to others, but before much was done the United State government purchased the Orleans Territory and the question of honoring the Baron de Bastrop claim came up. It seem he sold the land to speculators, but we do find David Adair involved in a land transaction as late 1840.
Baron de Bastrop did make a direct contribution to Northeast Louisiana by interesting others with means and influence in the area. It is said that he knew and secured the interest of Edward Lumpton, who influence Thomas Jefferson to make the Louisiana purchase. General John Adair, Judge Charles Lynch, Aaron Burr, and Stephen Girard, The Philadelphia philanthropist, became interested in the “Washita” country through the Baron, who was an adventurer and a speculator. He dreamed of a great wheat state and trade with the Indians, but, of course, he and the others were more interested in the land near the large waterways, the only means of transportation for large quantities of supplies. Thus, the land between the rivers was left to land speculators and eventually the small farmers and planters. From “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Batton, Sam T. (Mrs.)
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was made possible by the donation of 10 acres on North Hood Street by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. J. P. Brown, C. Rupert Evans, Elmus Coleman, W. T. Mithiner, George Lensing, Frank Byerly, G. L. Levy, and Mrs. Sam T. Batton were on the first Hospital Board members. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Baty in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Baty, John Nov. 27, 1898 - Oct. 07, 1963 AR PFC 26 Infantry 1 Div. - WWI

Bauer, Betty (see Lensing, Leo & Betty)

Baur, Grace
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): “Grace Baur is a secretary, designer, and craftsman.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Bayles, Buron Arnold
Buron Arnold Bayles was born Oct. 14, 1911, at Point, LA. His parents were William Wesley and Mattie Albritton Bayles. They lived in Kilbourne, LA., but he graduated from Oak Grove High School, and from LA. Tech (B.S.), and L. S. U. (M. Ed.) He and Sybil Moore [see Bayles, Sybil (Moore)] also of West Carroll Parish. Their sons are Jerry Lee Bayles and William T. Bayles [see their bios.] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
TEACHERS: B. A. Bayles was hired as the agriculture teacher at Monticello in 1942. Mr. Bayles became principal of Monticello on Aug. 4, 1943. In 1945 was named principal of the Transylvania School. In 1946 Mrs. B. A. Bayles was chosen clerk in the parish school board office. In 1966 Mr. Buron A. Bayles replaced M. M. Walsworth when he retired. B. A. Bayles retired in Aug. 1970. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.
BRIARFIELD ACADEMY: Briarfield Academy opened 1969. In 1971 B. A. Bayles was named principal, followed by John Hopkins in 1976. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for the 1961-62 term was Buron A. Bayles. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Bayles, Jerry Lee
Son of B. A. and Sybil (Moore) Bayles. Jerry Lee graduated from Northeast LA. University and served 13 months with the Army in Korea. He married the former Sheila Walker and they have 3 children. Jerry is in business in Monroe, LA. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bayles, Sybil (Moore)
Sybil Moore was born in Ocean View, VA. In 1921 she graduated from Oak Grove High School as valedictorian and later attended business school. She married Buron Arnold Bayles. [see Bayles, B. A.], also of West Carroll Parish, were married in 1941. She worked at the ASC office in Oak Grove, then in East Carroll Extension Office, served as the Clerk of the School Board and then as Clerk of the Town of L. P. In 1956 she was with the Bank of Dixie as assistant cashier, and is presently a cashier and Vice-President. She is a member of the First Baptist Church and teaches an adult Sunday School class.
BUSINESSES AND RECREATION; Banks: “The Bank of Dixie, formerly the L. P. Bank, celebrated its 75th in 1973. The 1st Board of Directors included. S. W. Smith, Jr., Jasper N. Hill, J. W. Tooke, Jr., E. J. Hamley, Phil McGuire, J. C. Pittman, & J. E. Reynolds. 1st President of this bank was S. W. Smith, Jr. Later other officers included are: Vice-President George T. Hider, Leo Lensing, T. E. Hanks, P. G. Marron, Michael Lensing, and Sybil Bayles.“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Bayles, William T.
Son of B. A. and Sybil (Moore) Bayles. William T. is a graduate of Northeast LA. University and holds a Master’s from LA. Tech. He is a teacher and coach at Briarfield Academy. He and his wife, the former Marsha Mark have 2 children. Son of B. A. and Sybil (Moore) Bayles. Jerry Lee graduated from Northeast LA. University and served 13 months with the Army in Korea.

Bazer, Bryan
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bazer, R.O.
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastors of the church was R. O. Bazar. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Beal, Mother Honey
BLACK CHURCHES; CHINA GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH: Organize in 1935 by Robert Paine and family. Mother Honey Beal, Deaconess Elmira Scott, J. W. Walker and others. Meeting were first held in the Winterfield School. In 1950 land upon which to build a church was bought from Martha Claiborne. Rev. Butler is the present pastor. [1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Beacham, Pauline
1929 ECHO ~ Pauline was a senior in 1929. "Small and neat with the sweet charm of soft slow music. A lot of mischief that seems hidden but no one has been able to discover it in Polly." She was in the Choral Club, and Secretary of her senior class.

Bean, Eula (Miss)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: The faculty of the L.P. school in 1907 - 1908 was 1st Assistant; Miss Lucie Nunn, 7th & 8th Grades; Miss Irma Williams, 5th & 6th grades; Miss Belle Briant, 3rd & 4th grades; Miss Eula Bean, Literature, Expression, & Physical Culture; Miss Nettie Brown, Music; Miss Minnie Collum. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Beard in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Beard, James 1873 - 1944 FATHER - DM W/Myrtle Cole Beard
Beard, Myrtle Cole 1894 - 1988 DM W/James Beard
Beard, Virginia (see Estes, Virginia Beard)

Beard, Delma
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: In July of 1920 one of the teachers employed for Lake Providence was Miss Delma Beard. “A Place to Remember”

Beard, Isham B. & Elizabeth (Curry)
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the SE of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
He was born Sept. 18th 1810, if Jefferson Co., Miss. His father, James Beard moved to Carroll Parish about the year 1825. In 1832, he went to Warren Co., Miss., and married Miss Elizabeth Currie. He stayed there one year, and moved back to Carroll Parish. On the 1st on Nov. 1859, his wife died, after bearing him twelve children, six of whom are still living. In 1835, he joined the M. E. Church South, of which he was a faithful member, until he died. He was again married; this time to Miss Cordelia M. E. Newhall, who still survives him. From this union sprang six children, five of whom still live. He had been the owner of his first and present home fifty years.
After a long and useful life of 80 years, after fulfilling his mission, Mr. I. B. Beard quietly passed away at his home last Saturday, surrounded by children and grandchildren. His life was that of an upright, Christian man, an honor to his community and a blessing to his notoriety. (Not sure where this info came from)
NEWSPAPER; August 30, 1884: Mr. I. B. Beard of this parish has invented and caused to be patented a "Double Hiller & Cultivator", which he proposes to exhibit at the World's Centennial Exposition at New Orleans, next fall.

Beard, James T.
EARLY SETTLERS: “On Nov. 10, 1841, Isham B. Beard and wife Elizabeth Curry and James T. Beard received a land patent signed by Martin Van Buren, President of the U. S.. In the same year, a record in Conveyance Book C. pages 392-393 states that ‘it is well understood that Black Bayou is the dividing line between the land of Jesse H. Chaney on the SE of the bayou and the land herein conveyed to Charles H. Webb’.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Beard, James
ASSESSORS; 1882 & 1885: James Beard. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
LAW; REGISTRAR OF VOTERS: Records of this office date back to 1917 when John C. Bass, Jr. served as Registrar. George F. Blackburn later held this office, followed by James Beard, who was succeeded by his wife, Myrtle Beard. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.”

Beard, James (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members. Mrs. C. R. Brown was the first President. Mrs. James Beard was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Beard, Joe
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Joe Beard was an early officer of Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Beard, Mary
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1897, Miss Maud Taylor was 1st assistant at Providence school; Miss Mary Beard was 2nd Assistant, and Miss Katie McCulloch, 3rd Asst. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.“

Beard, Myrtle (Cole) [see Beard, James and Beard, Mrs. James)

Beard, Rose Mary
Rose Mary Beard was born on July 18, 1942 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co Arkansas. The daughter of James Beard and Myrtle Cole, she was born June 24, 1919 in Lake Providence Louisiana. She married Harold Eugene Barlow, born May 27, 1918 in Barlow, Copiah Co Mississippi, and died June 28, 1944 in World War II, burial in Hazelhurst City Cemetery, Copiah Co Mississippi. She died December 13, 2001 in Kosciusko Mississippi.

Bearden in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bearden, Elmer Nov. 05, 1904 - Nov. 18, 1985
Bearden, Zelma K. 1918 - 1960

Beasley, Cecil L.
SHADY LAKE NURSING HOME: The Shady Lake Nursing Home was officially opened in Oct. 1972. The present local administrator is Cecil L. Beasley. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Beatty, D. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1886: Drs. D. Beatty and Dr. Henry Robinson, dentists. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Becks in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Beck, Albert L. Nov. 09, 1906 - Oct. 19, 1944
Beck, James Albert Jan. 29, 1934 - July 31, 1953

Beck, C. O.
CHURCHES; SONDHEIMER BAPTIST: This church was organized April 15, 1940. Rev. T H. Mercer was the first pastor. On Nov. 18, 1962, celebrating its 22nd year the Deacons of the church that year was H. N. Pippen, P. S. Lee, Harry Murray, Raymond Bradley, and C. O. Beck. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Beck, Helen C. [see Van Fossen, Thomas L.]

Beck, Helen Key (see BIOGRAPHIES: VanFossen, Samuel)

Beebe, ?
“Many early settlers just staked out their claims without buy from anyone. Later, we find a few of them clearing their titles with the federal government after the U. S. Survey of 1841. Their claims wee honored if they were living on the firms. We will recall the surveyors were instructed to mark such farms and not mo Rosina B. Holland died.
I know she was still living during the siege of Vicksburg, and know, too, that there was a son, John Bittleman Holland, who fought in the War and was paroled both after Vicksburg's capture and the War's end. He married a Mattie McBeth and moved to New Orleans, I think. LAURETTE

Beiller, Elizabeth [see Blackburn, Henry B. and also Bosworth, Felix (Judge)]

Belden, Charles M.
EMAIL: Date: Wed, 7 Apr 1999 16:57:56 EDT From: LucyRea@aol.com
“Thanks for the Banner Democrat clippings. The puzzle gets deeper and deeper.
I'm particularly interested in the family story regarding the suicide, due to AGB's loosing Sheriff's election to carpetbagger. Too, I've never heard of Charles M. Belden, but would certainly think there must be a connection.”
“Many of my family lived and died in the Parish, including my mother, Lucy Rea, daughter of Capt. Richard N. Rea of Alabama Plantation and Lake Providence, who was born and raised there. Other families in your area were the Newton Hollands, and Albert Goodrich Belden and his family.“ LUCY

Beldons in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Beldon, Albert Goodrich Mar. 09, 1843 - Mar. 15, 1886
Beldon, Lucy H. 1838 - 1933

Bells in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bell, Bessie (see Willis, Bessie Bell)
Bell, Delha 1873 - 1953 DM W/Richard Bell
Bell, Ella Noland 1902 - 1977 DM W/William Yancey Bell
Bell, Francis Rebecca 1839 - 1916
Bell, Hattie Nelly 02/20/1867 - 06/28/1882 Daughter of _ D. & Fanny R. Bell
Bell, Lela P. Aug. 31, 1856 - Jan. 27, 1944
Bell, Margaret J. (see Keen, Margaret J. Bell)
Bell, Mae (see White, Mae Bell)
Bell, Richard 1881 - 1948 DM W/Delha Bell
Bell, William Daniel Feb. 26, 1829 - April 09, 1911
Bell, William Yancey 1895 - 1964 DM W/Ella Noland Bell

Bell, Boyd
Boyd Bell is listed in the 1810 Census, which at that time was part of Ouachita parish. “Settlers began to come in after the United State’s purchase of the territory out of which Carroll Parish was later carved. Among the first settler are the names of James & Moses Floyd, Abram Morehouse, William Hood, George Hook, John Milligan (Millikin), Boyd Bell, and Shapley Owens. These surnames appear early in the records of West Carroll Parish also“. “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin

Bell, Edmond
CLUBS; AMERICAN LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion was organized in 1920. On of the Charter members was Edmond Bell. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bell, Ella (Noland)
Mrs. Ella Noland Bell and her family, residents of Lake Providence, were descendants of Emile Morancy. [see Mornacy, Emile]
ASSESSORS; 1964: Ella N. Bell. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bell, Elsie (see Terral, Mrs. Forrest M.)

Bell, Lela (Mrs.)
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. One of the officers was Mrs. Lela Bell Mrs. Susie Peck “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Bell, W. D. (Doctor)
EDUCATION: During Reconstruction time, 1873, the L.P. Male and Female High School, at L. P., LA. secures a teacher, well recommended, and the school is open for receiving scholars. Tuition, $5 a month. (Signed) Dr. W. D. Bell, Present: W. C. Lyons, Secretary.
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: In 1898 Dr. F. R. Bernard, W. D. Bell, and Messrs. E. J. Hamley, J. N. Hill, and T. J. Powell made up the Town Board of Health. A diphtheria epidemic broke out in 1902, the town was divided into 5 sections, with Dr. Bell in charge of one of the sections “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
HEALTH UNIT: In 1904 Dr. W. D. Bell was serving on the Parish Health Unit and was employed as Health Unit Physician. He served until his death in Dec. 1912. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1874: Dr. W. D. Bell. 1880: Dr. Bell, with office in Bernard’s Drug Store. 1882: Dr. Bell. 1885: Dr. Bell placed announcements in paper that he “would refuse calls where the accounts were not settled”. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bell, W. T.
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: W. T. Bell served as Mayor from 1913. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bell, William Yancey
ASSESSORS; 1944: William Y. Bell. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Yancey Bell was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
LAW; THREE COURTHOUSES: On July 1, 1901, the old courthouse was replaced by a new building, dedicated by Pecan Grove Lodge. The cornerstone bore the names of the first Police Jury: Robert Nicholson, President; W. C. Hope, Phil McGuire, A. M. Nelson, T. W. Jay, Members; Yancey Bell, Jury Clerk; F. X. Ransdell, Judge; J. W. Dunn, Sheriff; George F. Blackburn, Town Clerk. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with F. X. Ransdell as one of the Directors. One of the Directors was Yancey Bell[1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
ASSESSORS; 1908: Yancey Bell. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for 1941-42 was William Yancey Bell. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Belle, Eola
BIOS: Died Aug. 29, 1885. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Belser, Ethel
EDUCATORS: Mrs. Belser was born in L. P. She attended a preparatory school in San Antonio and then received the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Chicago. She enjoyed a long career as a teacher in L. P. in the upper elementary grades and in high school. In 1955 the school year book, The Deltan, was dedicated to her with “honor and respect”. Ethel wrote a unit on economic education which was included in a school textbook. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Belser, Ozell (see also Trieschmann, William F.)

Bemis, Judson M.
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: When Elizabeth Cash Sellers died in Jan. 1867, Matthew B. Sellers sold his beloved Oakland. The land, the elegant residence, and the furniture - everything, except the silverware and family pictures, were sold to Judson M. Bemis for the sum of $55,000. The down payment was $30,000, “cash in hand“ with two noted endorsed by J. O. and J. W. Pierce of St. Louis, MO. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Benbrook, Daniel G.
PLANTATIONS; CROW’S ROOST: “Involved in the ownerships of Crow’s Roost are the names Gonzales, De Santo, Bowie, Robert J. Walker, and James C. Wilkins of Natchez, Daniel G. Benbrook, Peter Little, John Gedge, William Laughlin, and others.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Benevell, E. (Doctor)
PLANTATIONS; HIGHLAND: Highland Plantation was first owned by Dr. E. Benevell of Lexington, VA. It was created from a combination of Lone Wolf and Highland and was on Old River in Bunch’s Bend. After Benevell the next owner was James G. Spencer. It had a mill house, a corn mill and an engine boiler. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Benham, George Chittenden
RECONSTRUCTION: “Some northerners did move into the parish, including George C. Benham and the former Union general, William L. McMillan. Disparagingly called carpetbaggers by their neighbors, McMillan and Benham were successful as planters. Few other northern speculators survived for more than a season.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
“A NEW PARISH IS BORN: “At the end of the Civil War, the Federal Government gave all colored people the right to vote and disenfranchised all men who fought in the war. To insure this they supervised elections, George Benham, carpetbagger and Republican, was the political boss of Carroll Parish. Jim Gardener was representative for awhile.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”
PARISH JUDGE: 1868: George C. Benham. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS; The Eagle: George C. Benham, who purchased Elton Plantation, began publication of the Elton Eagle in 1868. Benham was a Northern soldier who had been stationed at L. P. with the Union Army. His brother was W. N. Benham, the town treasurer.
RECONSTRUCTION; POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: Headed by George C. Benham, a handful of whites, seized control of the political machinery of the parish. George was elected in 1868 as Parish Judge, and he was also elected to the Police Jury and served as president of that body. Representatives from Carroll included George Benham and the freedman, Cain Sartain. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
RADICAL CORRUPTION: “In a campaign speech against Radical George Benham, a moderate Republican named Dennis exclaimed “It is time to unload and throw off the rascals who have been living off the labors of the colored man.”” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Elected as vestry on July 27, 1873 was David L. Morgan and John Seay, Wardens. One of the first Vestry was George C. Benham. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: August D. Wright was the editor and Cain Sartain, a Negro man, was one of the proprietors. A 1873 issue: “Hon. George C. Benham and Hon. Cain Sartain, Parish Representatives. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was George C. Benham in 1866 and 1868. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: A suit in 1870 listed John O. Pierce and wife, Cornelia, as sole owners of Oakland. The Pierces sold to George C. and W. W. Benham. The Benhams sold Oakland to J. Edward Leonard of Westhester, PA.. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Benham, W. N.
W. N. Benham was town treasurer, and brother to George Chittenden Benham. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: August D. Wright was the editor and Cain Sartain, a Negro man, was one of the proprietors. A 1873 issue: “Hon. W. N. Benham, Assistant Sheriff.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Benham, W. W.
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: A suit in 1870 listed John O. Pierce and wife, Cornelia, as sole owners of Oakland. The Pierces sold to George C. and W. W. Benham. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
RECONSTRUCTION; BLACKS IN POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: The Police Jury remained all white, but it was controlled by the Republicans, with C. H. Nash serving as president and W. W. Benham serving as treasurer. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Benjamins in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Benjamin, INFANTS 1- Died Jan. 07, 1844 2- Died July 07, 1848, Infants of William & Rachel Benjamin
Benjamin, Elizabeth McCullock Aug. 05, 1878 - Sept. 27, 1963
Benjamin, Mary April 17, 1833 - April 06, 1834
Benjamin, Mary E. Dec. 09, 1844 - Sept. 15, 1849
Benjamin, Ralph June 4, 1854 - Sept. 08, 1905 (see original paper)
Benjamin, Thomas J. Feb. 02, 1837 - Oct. 27, 1963
Benjamin, William April 29, 1855 Aged about 55 years
Benjamin, William Briethaupt Jan. 24, 1874 - Oct. 15, 1963
Benjamin, WM H. Sept. 30, 1841 - Oct. 05, 1905
Benjamin, WM. W. Nov. 17, 1835 - March 29, 1836

Benjamin, Alex
Pvt. Co. D. 3rd La. Cavalry (Harrison's). Federal Rolls of Prisoners of War Captured Natchez, Miss., July 15th, 1863. Forward to Camp Morton, Ind. Desires to take the Oath and Give Bond Sept. 7th, 1863. Bondsman, Alexander D. H., Lake Providence. Confederate Research Sources Volume 1 B. page 165

Benjamin, Margaret
Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769-1923: Volume 4. LUTHER E. WHEAT, M. D.
“On the 29th of September, 1919, Mr. Pennebaker was married in Jackson, Mississippi, to Miss Margaret Benjamin, a native of Lake Providence, Louisiana, and a relative of some of the most prominent families of Mississippi. She was educated in a college at Columbus, Mississippi, and is an accomplished artist. One of her paintings, a landscape, won a prize at the Tri-State Fair at Memphis in 1922. Socially Mr. and Mrs. Pennebaker occupy an enviable position and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by their many friends. Mr. Pennebaker is a member of the Memphis University Club. He does not hesitate to announce himself as the supporter of law and order, of progress, reform and improvement, nor to show to his fellowmen that he is actuated by the highest ideals in the matter of public duty as well as of private service.”
A few planters signed an allegiance to the U. S. that brought a rift among neighbors. There were those willing to lose everything for the cause of the South and felt bitter toward any neighbor signing such an oath. These unfortunates were often sought out by the guerrillas and murdered, one such was Graham Benjamin whose father built Homestead Plantation located south of Lake Providence. Reference: Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Benjamin, Richard Graham
PLANTATIONS; CONCORD: “This plantation was occupied by Richard Graham Benjamin.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Benjamin, Virginia (see Hider, Mrs. George Turner)

Benjamin, William (Sr.) (see also Hood, Harbird)
BIOS: Cotton ginning brought William Benjamin of New York to Louisiana. He was a friend of the inventor Eli Whitney and came to this state sell and install cotton gins. He married Rachel Graham of Carroll Parish and they made their home at Homestead Plantation which she inherited. They had 5 children. When William Benjamin and Rachel (Graham) Benjamin had died, three young sons went to New York to live with relatives. Two of them died young, one son dying in the Civil War. Of their five children, William Briethaupt Benjamin continued to make his home here. “A Place to Remember“, by Georgia Pinkston.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with W. H. Benjamin as one of the Directors. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Benjamin, William Brietaupt, Jr.
BIOS: William Brietaupt Benjamin is the son of William Benjamin. When his mother and father (Rachel (Graham) and William Sr.) both had died, he went to New York to live with relatives. William Jr., after his marriage to Caroline Breithaupt of New York, returned and lived on Homestead Plantation. [*NOTE: They were living on Homestead in 1910] William Breithaupt Benjamin continued to make his home here, and married Elizabeth McCulloch. They were the parents of three daughters, and one, Mrs. George T. Hider, Virginia, still lives here. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; HOMESTEAD: Owned by W. B. Benjamin in 1841. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Benjamin, William B. (Mrs.)
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. W. B. Benjamin“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Benjamin, W. H.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Rev. Alexander McLeod came to the village of Providence in 1846 establishing the first services of the Episcopal Church. Elected as vestry on July 27, 1873 was David L. Morgan and John Seay, Wardens. One of the first Vestry was William H. Benjamin. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with F. X. Ransdell as one of the Directors. One of the Directors was W. H. Benjamin. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1882: Dr. Dr. W. H. Benjamin (Diphtheria). “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bentley, Miss
TEACHERS: On Dec. 8, 1943 teacher Miss Bently was granted a “military leave” on Dec. 8, 1943. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Benton, Marie Louise
PLANTATIONS; WOODSTOCK: Marie Louise was a daughter of Warren M. Benton and his third wife, Miss Royall, of Texas. From this union two daughters were born. Along with her younger sister, Sarah N. Benton , she enjoyed the leisure and prosperity of Woodstock from the time of her birth until marriage. Marie Louise was four years old when Sarah, or “Miss Sally“ as she was called, was born at Woodstock in 1853. Marie L. married Frank S. Garner on July 24, 1871. Mrs. Frank Garner served as town librarian and was cast in all the plays presented during this period. She was employed as the editor of The East Carroll Democrat, published by J. N. Turner, on Dec. 1, 1883: “Mrs. M. L. Garner, who take charge today of the editorial column of the Democrat is well known in our parish as a lady of high literary attainment and most excellent writer. She soon became the editor of her own newspaper, The Carroll Banner, which she published until 1886. “A Place to Remember”, by Pinkston.
NOTE: Mary Louise was a writer. She wrote a sketch of the sisters early lives in which she tells of their education at Hagaman Academy and at Nazareth Literary and Benevolent Institution in Kentucky during the Civil War years. There is also a book titled “Campfire Stories of the Mississippi Valley Campaign”. Book displays the writer to be Marie Louise Benkston, but I believe it is suppose to be Marie Louise Benton]

Benton, Mary
PLANTATIONS; GAILLIARD: Galliard Plantation was sold at a sheriff‘s sale to Thomas B. Gailliard early in 1860. Gailliard owned the plantation for 8 years, and then again went under the sheriff’s hammer in 1868, when Mary Benton and Daniel Hubbard bought it. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Benton, C. D.
LAW; THE THREE COURTHOUSES; The 1st meeting of the Police Jury of the newly formed East Carroll Parish was held on Wednesday, May 30, 1877, at the Courthouse. Appointed to the Jury by Governor Francis T. Nichols was C. D. Benton. He was duly elected and qualified for the parish of Carroll, and held over by virtue of the law dividing the parish. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Benton, Sarah N.
PLANTATIONS; WOODSTOCK: Sarah N. was a daughter of Warren M. Benton and his third wife, Miss Royall, of Texas. Along with her older sister, Marie Louise Benton , she enjoyed the leisure and prosperity of Woodstock from the time of her birth until marriage. Sarah, or “Miss Sally“ as she was called, was born at Woodstock in 1853, Louise was 4 years old. Sarah Benton and Thomas J. Powell were married on Dec. 21, 1875. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Benton, Warren M.
PLANTATIONS; GAILLIARD: Galliard Plantation was sold at a sheriff‘s sale to Thomas B. Gailliard early in 1860. Gailliard owned the plantation for 8 years, and then again went under the sheriff’s hammer in 1868, when Mary Benton and Daniel Hubbard bought it. Hubbard latter sold his undivided one-half interest in the plantation to John and Charles Chaffe of New Orleans, and they later sold it to Warren M. Benton. Gailliard Plantation later became the property of F. F. Montgomery and Edward James Delony. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston. [Note various spellings: Gailliard, Gillard, Gilliard, Gillyard used in parish records]
PLANTATIONS; POINT LOOK OUT: One of the Job Bass daughters, Martha, who was a widow of E. B. Watson and also a widow of Dr. David O. Barton, became the second wife of Warren M. Benton. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; WOODSTOCK: Woodstock was formed from the original Point Look Out Plantation. It was owned by Warren M. Benton and his 3rd wife, Miss Royall, of Texas. From this union two daughters were born. Marie Louise, along with her younger sister, Sarah N. Benton, enjoyed the leisure and prosperity of Woodstock from the time of their birth until marriage.
Benton came from Georgia in 1837, was married four times. Within the Benton family, 3 women bore the name of Maria Loiuisa Benton and 3 bore the name Sarah or Sally Benton. Warren’s 1st wife was Lucy Hunt. They had a daughter named Sarah Elizabeth Benton. After Lucy died in Georgia, Warren took a second wife, Martha Bass, in Carroll Parish, Louisiana, and they had a daughter named Alice Benton. Martha’s brother was James A. Bass. Martha (Bass) Benton died in Dec. 1843, and James, her brother, and Warren, her husband, were executors of the will and were to manage the estate which had been left to her two minor daughters. Warren Benton’s 4th marriage was to Mary Hughes, sometime prior to June 1860. He died on Feb. 1, 1873. 1st administrator of his estate was his son-in-law, Frank S. Garner. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
Wed, 19 Jan 2000 07:39:25 -0700 From: Ellen Crawford
“As to some of Warren's marriages. I don't know where he married some of his wives, but he and Martha Bass were married in Warren Co across the river. I think he traveled quite a bit back and forth to KY. His mother was still living in the 1860 census. She was born around 1768. She was a daughter of Billingsley Roberts and Betty Manen and was born in Maryland.” ELLEN
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 08:15:44 -0700
From: Ellen Crawford
“We were out of town for a couple of days, so I have just now read your messages. Thanks so much for sending all the info. I did look at your web page on E Carroll Parish. You have put a lot of work into that and it is great.
I have spent quite a bit of time studying records of E Carroll. For several years I had a brick wall on my Benton family. My gr-grandfather Sully Reeves Benton was a grandson of Warren M Benton. Or at least I believed he was. I knew that Sully's mother was Mary M Benton, but it took forever to find his father's name. I felt that Warren was his grandfather but had no proof. Finally I went through land and court records line by line. I knew that Augustus Job Bass was a grandson of Warren. I finally across an entry for the tutorship of Augustus Job Bass. And there it was. Erasmus Benton, uncle of Augustus and Warren his grandfather. Then I went through the probate records
line by line and finally found where Mary M Benton had filed to be executrix for her husband's estate and tutor of their children, Sully Reeves and George Warren Benton. Her husband's name was Erasmus and he died in 1858. I thought it odd that his name did not appear in any index I could find in any of the records.
Erasmus Benton's widow, Mary M, married James M Climer. He was in the Civil War. About 1867 they moved to Hill Co TX.
Warren's first marriage was in KY for Erasmus was born in KY. I don't know if she died in KY or in GA. I do know he next married Lucy Jones. I have never found either of the marriages, but in court records of E Carroll I found where he filed an action to try to gain control of the estate that his daughter Sarah had received from her grandmother Lucy Thompson Jones Hunt in GA.
I found that his 3rd wife Martha Bass had been married twice prior and had a daughter by a previous husband.
His 4th wife was Mary Royall. His 5th wife was Mary, last name unknown. I found in court records that she took him to the cleaners and I think there was some court action still going on when he died.” ELLEN

Bernards in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bernard, Ella M. Age 2 years, 5 months
Bernard, Estelle Turner, Nov. 17, 1936, wife of Frederick Robert Bernard
Bernard, Frederick Robert, 1851 - 1922
Bernard, Katie, 1863
Bernard, Samuel P., June 17, 1875, Founder of Bernard Drug Store
Bernard, Sarah G., July 15, 1892, Relic of S. P. Bernard
Bernard, S. Pinnock, Aged 3 years, 3 month

Bernard, Dr. F. R.
EXPANSION OF ORIGINAL TOWN: Some firms and land purchasers in the town in the period from 1833 to 1866: Bernard’s Drug Store was located o Fourth Street. From Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember
EARLY BUSINESS OF LAKE PROVIDENCE, LA.: Lake Providence has always been the seat of government for the parish, except from 1855 to 1870, when, as a part of the parish of Carroll, the seat was moved to Floyd (now West Carroll). Some of the business houses and churches of the early town are mentioned in old newspapers during the years 1848 through 1881, two of them were the Bernard Drug Store and Donahue & Bernard. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with F. X. Ransdell as one of the Directors. One of the Directors was Dr. F. R. Bernard. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
HEALTH; HEALTH UNIT: In 1898 Dr. F. R. Bernard, W. D. Bell, and Messrs. E. J. Hamley, J. N. Hill, and T. J. Powell made up the Town Board of Health. A diphtheria epidemic broke out in 1902, the town was divided into 5 sections, with Dr. Bernard in charge of one of the sections “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
HEALTH UNIT: In 1916 F. R. Bernard was named the town physician. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1878: (Quarantine)-- Dr. Richard P. D. Hays, Dr. A. G. Brock Drs Hought and Bernard. 1882: Drs. Bernard (Diphtheria). 1884: Dr. Y. J. Eaton of Indianapolis. He was here for a while and was an Eye and Ear specialist. 1885: Drs. Bernard and Bell placed announcements in paper that they “would refuse calls where the accounts were not settled”. 1886: Dr. F. R. Bernard, a delegate to AMA Convention. 1890 - 1920: Dr. F. R. Bernard, Providence. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPER: Sept. 1, 1883: The most delightful evening recorded in the society calendar of the season, was the social reunion and soiree dansante at the residence of Dr. Bernard on Wednesday night. He had the able assistance of Mr. Guenard, whose delicate intuition in all matter of etiquette and form made him a valuable coadjutor. One of the most entertaining features of the evening was vocal music, in which the highly cultivated voices of the Misses McCulloch and Powell blended most harmoniously. [more of story]

Bernard, Mr.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was ? Bernard in 1867. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Berry in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Berry, Lillie (see Cooper, Lillie Berry)

Berry, Mr.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1847: Mr. Berry. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Berry, E. J.
TELEPHONES: In 1906 there was to be a phone in the Mayor’s office, the light plant, and in the residence of E. J. Berry, Manager of the Light Plant. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Berry, James M.
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at L. P. was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was James M. Berry in 1853. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bertholomy, F. B.
RECONSTRUCTION; POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: Blacks succeeded in winning several parish offices in 1871. Five members of the seven man School Board were black - J. A. Gla, Nicholas Burton, David King, F. B. Bertholomy, and Henry Hilliard. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Best, Mary (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; SONDHEIMER BAPTIST: This church was organized April 15, 1940. One of the 10 Charter Members was Mrs. Mary Best. Rev. T H. Mercer was the first pastor. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Bieller, Elizabeth Lester (see Bosworth, Mrs. Felix Bosworth)

Bienville, Jean Baptiste le Moyne de
Jean Baptiste le Moyne de Bienville was the first governor of Louisiana. He has the unique distinction of the main street of Oak Grove being charted on the map. Biennville and his company of twenty Canadians and a Ouachita guide blazed a trail used for almost a century before the white men. This route in now the state highway from L. P. to Bastrop. On May 10, 1730, Bienville and his men crossed Bayou Macon, now known as Lane's Ferry. [A historical marker placed there on May 10, 1955 was erected by the D.A.R. commemorating the 225th anniversary]

Biggs in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Biggs, Mable Greer July 19, 1897 - Nov. 17, 1973
Biggs, Mary Rozina Aug. 27, 1917 - June 13, 1968
Biggs, Thomas Grey, Sr. March 20, 1894 - Sept. 18, 1956 "Doctor"

Biggs, Thomas G. (D. D. S.)
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: T. G. Biggs, D. D. served as Mayor from 1923 to 1945. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
"In 1930 Mayor Biggs earned $1,000 a year.” A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
BIOS: “Dr. Thomas G. Biggs came to Lake Providence in 1919, following his discharge from the U. S. Army. He was born in Hickory, Miss., on Mar. 20, 1894. His parents were Thomas J. Biggs and Mary C. McGee. He grew up in Caldwell Parish, LA. He received his dental degree from Tulane University. In 1919 he became Mayor of L. P., and served for 24 years. He was chairman of the parish Democratic Executive Committee, President of the Board of Election Supervisors, and an active member of the Mason order, as well as a member of the Rotary Club, president from 1947-48. Dr. Biggs and Tommy Mable Greer of Clarks, La., were married on January 1, 1918. Their only child, Thomas G. Biggs, Jr. became a physician and has his own clinic in Oak Grove, La. Since Dr. Biggs served as Worshipful Master of Pecan Grove Masonic Lodge No. 222 for 15 years, he was given full Masonic honors at his funeral in 1956. Mayor William B. Cone issued a proclamation honoring Dr. Biggs and businesses were closed in respect.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
MAYORS SINCE 1875 TO 1976: T. G. Biggs, D. D. served as Mayor from 1923 to 1945. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; AMERICAN LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion was organized in 1920, with one of the Charter members being Thomas G. Biggs. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was on North Hood Street on land donated by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. One of the doctors on the first medical staff was T. G. Biggs “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
OTHER PHYSICIANS: Another physician who was reared in this parish but practices elsewhere was Dr. T. G. Biggs, Jr. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. T. G. Biggs was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for 1947-48 was Thomas G. Biggs. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Biggs, Thomas J.
BIOS: Thomas J. Biggs was a planter in Caldwell Parish. Thomas J. and Mary C. (McGee) Biggs had nine children. One of there children was D.D.S. Thomas G. Biggs. "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Biggs, Tommie Mabel (Greer)
Tommy Mabel Greer married Dr. Thomas Biggs on Jan. 1, 1918. She was from Clarks, Louisiana. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Mabel Biggs. “A Place to Remember”
COMMUNICATIONS; POST MASTERS: The Post office at Lake Providence was established on Dec. 26, 1835. One of the Postmasters of Lake Providence, La. from 1835 to 1976 was Tommy Mabel (Greer) Biggs in 1937. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Birdsongs in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Birdsong, Julia Morgan Pearl Aug. 18, 1888 - Sept. 16, 1967
Birdsong, William Herbert March 17, 1883 - Feb. 23, 1941

Bishops in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bishop, Sarah Pratt 1839 - 1922
Bishop, Mary (see Erwing, Mary Bishop)
Bishop, Walter J. 07/28/1995 - 08/03/1995

Bishop, George Poole
Born in 1884, Mr. Bishop came to East Carroll in 1925, and took up farming. He was married to Eva Blanche Amos. They had a daughter they named Edna Bishop. He is remembered for his service to the parish as a member of the Police Jury from 1940 to 1956, serving as President from 1952 to 1956. Mr. Bishop died on Feb. 16, 1960. Mrs. Bishop resides in the Monticello community. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
HIS STORY - FLETCHER ALTON BABB: Alton Babb had succeeded C. J. Wyly‘s position, as clerk of the Police Jury, upon his death in 1932. He said some of the prominent men in parish affairs was Mr. Tom Estes, parish Prison Farm Manager. The farm proved successful. Members of the Prison Farm Committee included: Tib Mitchiner, R. K. Howard, A. T. Phillips, Sidney Guenard, Sr., Fred Holt, F. O. Blair, Mr. Sykes, George Bishop, and W. B. Ragland, Sr. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
E. C. LIBRARY BOARD: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. The Police Jury appointed George P. Bishop, Police Jury President and Ex-Officio member, on the 1st Library Board of Control. . “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bishop, John
COMMUNITIES OF THE PARISH, MONTICELLO:
“John Bishop and William Carroway were large land owners of Monticello in the early days.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Bishop, Myra
E. C. LIBRARY: The present library [1977] opened in June 29, 1954. Miss Elizabeth Cammack was appointed as its’ first librarian. Miss Myra Bishop, assistant librarian; Mrs. Naomi Rosenzweig, Miss Edna Faye Smith, and Miss Mary Belle McCain as assistants, and Mr. George Wise was the 1st bookmobile driver. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bissell, ? (Union)
FEDERAL OCCUPATION OF CARROLL PARISH: General James B. McPherson and the remainder of the 17th Army Corps’s arrived at Lake Providence on Feb. 24, ‘63, with General John L. Logan’s 3rd Division, General John McArthur’s 6th Division, and Bissell’s Engineering Brigade, the total of about 30,000 Federal troops were in Lake Providence. McPherson established his headquarters on Oakland Plantation. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bissinger, Ruby (Gulley)
Jan. 25, 1923 - Jan. 11, 1977

Blacks in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Black, A. F. 1868 - 1939
Black, George W. Nov. 4, 1865 - July 26, 1950
Black, Sarah Ann Oct. 01, 1890 (1946 ^) - Sept. 15, 1948

Blackburns in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blackburn, Catherine A. Shelby, March 3, 1819 - July 5, 1880
DM W/,& wife of David F. Blackburn
Blackburn, Catherine Shelby, Jan. 10, 1890 - June 5, 1893
Blackburn, David F., July 20, 1811 - Dec. 01, 1860
DM W/,Catherine A. Shelby Blackburn
Blackburn, Elizabeth (see Coleman, Elizabeth Blackburn)
Blackburn, Elizabeth (see Powell, Elizabeth Blackburn)
Blackburn, Elizabeth L. Died 05/06/1852 Age 34 yrs. Wife of H. B. Blackburn
Blackburn, Julia (see Davis, Julia Blackburn)
Blackburn, George Flourney 1854 - 1934
Blackburn, Narcisse (see Maguire, Narcisse; also see original paper)
Blackburn, Rebecca Branch Williams 1858 - 1927 W/Geo. Flourney Blackburn

Blackburn, Bessie [see Powell, Mrs. Thomas J. ]
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: Some of the well-remembered teachers in 1913 were Miss Isabel Ransdell, Mrs. Eugene Guenard, Miss Narcisse Blackburn, Miss Bessie Blackburn, Miss Myrtle Rice, and Miss Carmen Breazeale. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. Early activities included social and musical programs, teas, receptions, a wedding reception for two members, Bessie Blackburn and Thomas J. Powell, and a reception in honor of the Grand Worthy Matron of Louisiana. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, Catherine A. (Shelby)
Catherine Shelby Blackburn came to Carroll Parish in 1850 with her husband, David Flournoy Blackburn. When David Blackburn died in 1860 his will reads “It is my wish and earnest desire that there shall be no executors to my estate. That there shall be no appraisement of my property. That there shall be no action taken by any court in regard to it. It is my wish that my wife Catherine A. Blackburn, have the whole estate and manage it as she pleases for her benefit and that of our children.” “…. the whole to be at the discretion and judgment of my wife, Catherine.” Mrs. Catherine A. Blackburn died in 1880 at her beloved Shelburn. The succession proved that Mrs. Blackburn was the capable manager her husband thought. The heirs desired to accept the succession pure and simple, without benefit of inventory, and their wish was granted. George F. Blackburn was made executor of her estate. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Blackburn, David Flournoy“There was for Blackburn men that came from Kentucky and settled in Carroll Parish. William E. Blackburn, an attorney, David Flournoy Blackburn and Henry B. Blackburn, both show land purchases in 1850, and both were physicians. George Blackburn later settled in this region. Dr. David Flournoy Blackburn and wife Catherine A. Shelby came down the Mississippi River on a flatboat. They named their plantation Shelburn which was a combination of the family names of Shelby and Blackburn.
David Blackburn died on December 1, 1860, in the arms of General Edward Sparrow who had come to visit the patient. (4 generations later General Sparrow's great-great grandson married David Flournoy's great-great granddaughter; Frank Voelker and Isabel Ransdell.)
[*Cass Knight Shelby Notes: Letters from Mrs. Schneider, a descendant written to CKS in 1945, says Caterine was suppose to have been born on a flatboat on the Miss. River when her parents were moving from TN to MS.] [*NOTE: 1880 Census of L. P. shows a brother, B. P. Shelby, age 26, living with her at that time]
Catherine A. Blackburn died in 1880 at her beloved Shelburn. The succession proved that Mrs. Blackburn was the capable manager her husband thought.
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1861: Dr. D. F. Blackburn. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: David Flournoy Blackburn bought the land from the parish sheriff for $23,460., or $23 an acre. ½ was paid in cash and the remaining would be paid in two notes. Between 1847 & 1850 four Blackburn men settled in the parish; William E., David Flournoy, Henry B., and………. Blackburn. In 1850, David F. and Catherine A. Shelby Blackburns located there. They came down the MS. River on a flat boat from Kentucky. They combined the Blackburn name with Shelby to form the name of ‘Shelburn’. Six children were born to David and Catherine Blackburn: (1) Jane S. Blackburn, (2) Lulia Blackburn, (3) Kate Blackburn, (4) Lizzie F. Blackburn, (5) George F. Blackburn, and (6) Thomas Blackburn. Situated near the head of the lake the property is closely associated with the Davis, Ransdell, and Schneider families. David Flournoy Blackburn and Henry B. Blackburn recorded land purchases in 1850. Both were practicing physicians. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, George F.
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: George F. Blackburn, born @ 1854 is a son of Dr. David Flournoy and Catherine A. Shelby Blackburn. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
LOCAL STORIES: The Carroll Democrat, Sat., Nov. 2, 1889, give this account, entitled “East Carroll Tournament. An Immense Gathering, Fine Sport, A Delightful Day, and a Grand Ball. At Night. “ Tuesday morning dawned a bright, beautiful, sunshiny day, as buoyant and radiant as were the hopes and aspirations of the knight who were to win fresh laurels in the days’ tourney. About 10 o’clock the crowd began to congregate upon the Arlington grounds, but it was a least 1 o’clock before titling began. George F. Blackburn was one of the 16 knights that marched up to the grand stand.”…. When everything had been duly prepared the Knights formed a line before the Judges’ stand. George F. Blackburn‘s total, as rendered by the Judges, was “1” ring. His nickname was listed as “Knight of Shelburn”. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
CLERK OF COURT; 1900: George F. Blackburn, 9th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLERK OF COURT; 1920: George F. Blackburn, 6th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
LAW; THREE COURTHOUSES: On July 1, 1901, the old courthouse was replaced by a new building which was dedicated by Pecan Grove Lodge. The cornerstone bore the names of the first Police Jury: Robert Nicholson, President; W. C. Hope, Phil McGuire, T. W. Jay, Members; Yancy Bell, Jury Clerk; F. X. Ransdell, Judge; J. W. Dunn, Sheriff; George F. Blackburn, Town Clerk.
LAW; REGISTRAR OF VOTERS: Records of this office date back to 1917 when John C. Bass, Jr. served as Registrar. George F. Blackburn later held this office, followed by James Beard, who was succeeded by his wife, Myrtle Beard. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.”

Blackburn, Henry B.
Between 1847 & 1850 four Blackburn men settled in the parish; William E., David Flournoy, Henry B., and………. Blackburn. David Flournoy Blackburn and Henry B. Blackburn recorded land purchases in 1850. Both were practicing physicians. Dr. Henry B. was the second husband of Elizabeth Beiller Bosworth, widow of Judge Felix Bosworth. They lived at Holly Place, now known as Hollywood Plantation on Tensas Bayou. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, Jane S.
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: Jane S. Blackburn, daughter of Dr. David Flournoy and Catherine A. (Shelby) Blackburn, married Dr. William Morehead. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: When David Blackburn, Jane’s father, died in 1860 his will read “….I have given Jane S. Morehead, in property and money, $12,000 and advise and desire that each child have the same amount as soon as practicable, from the proceeds of the plantation, after they marry, or the boys come of age; that is Julia B. Davis is to have hers first, as soon as it can be raised. Then each girl is to have her share when she marries, and the boys theirs when they are age 21. The whole to be at the discretion and judgment of my wife, Catherine.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Blackburn, Julia (see BIOGRAPHIES: Schneider, William Henry & Fredericka)
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: Julia Blackburn, born daughter of Dr. David Flournoy and Catherine A. (Shelby) Blackburn, married Edward H. Davis of Belle Meade Plantation. They had 6 children. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: When David Blackburn, Jane’s father, died in 1860 his will read “….I have given Jane S. Morehead, in property and money, $12,000 and advise and desire that each child have the same amount as soon as practicable, from the proceeds of the plantation, after they marry, or the boys come of age; that is Julia B. Davis is to have hers first, as soon as it can be raised. Then each girl is to have her share when she marries, and the boys theirs when they are age 21. The whole to be at the discretion and judgment of my wife, Catherine.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Blackburn, Kate
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: Kate Blackburn, daughter of Dr. David Flournoy and Catherine A. (Shelby) Blackburn, married William L Gay. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, Lizzie F.
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: Lizzie F. Blackburn, daughter of Dr. David Flournoy and Catherine A. (Shelby) Blackburn, married Frank H. Coleman. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, Mary Shelby
[This must be a daughter of Catherine and David F. Blackburns, need to check it out?????]
According to a later newspaper account General John B. McPherson, the Federal officer in charge at Lake Providence succumbed to the charms of Mary Shelby Blackburn. "General McPherson had hardly located his camp when the attractions at the home at the head of the lake drew him thither--never did a noble Knight of ye olden time kneel with more earnest devotion at the feet of his lady love, than did the Commander of the 17th Corps bow at the shrine of Miss Shelby Blackburn." “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Blackburn, Narcisse
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: Some of the well-remembered teachers in 1913 were Miss Isabel Ransdell, Mrs. Eugene Guenard, Miss Narcisse Blackburn, Miss Bessie Blackburn, Miss Myrtle Rice, and Miss Carmen Breazeale. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Blackburn, Rebecca B. (Williams)
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. At the first meeting was Special Deputy, Mary S. Herring and member of the "Louise Chapter of Monroe". 1st WORTHY MATRON: Mrs. Rebecca Blackburn, and 1st WORTHY PATRON: Charles Hill. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, Thomas
PLANTATIONS; SHELBURN: Thomas Blackburn is a son of Dr. David Flournoy and Catherine A. Shelby Blackburn. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Blackburn, William E.
PLANTATIONS:: William E. Blackburn, an attorney, bought a town lot on the north side of the public square. He located his law office and stable. In 1849, while on a visit to Kentucky, he suddenly died. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1845: William E. Blackburn. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Blackman, Horace G.
PLANTATIONS: All Right Plantation was owned by Horace G. Blackman. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Blair in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blair, Frances Dec. 01, 1896 - Dec. 20, 1897 Daughter of Thomas & Kate Blair

Blair, Dorothy (see Perry, Shelby)

Blair, F. O.
HIS STORY - FLETCHER ALTON BABB:
Alton Babb had succeeded C. J. Wyly‘s position, as clerk of the Police Jury, upon his death in 1932. He said some of the prominent men in parish affairs was Mr. Tom Estes, parish Prison Farm Manager. The farm proved successful. Members of the Prison Farm Committee included: Tib Mitchiner, R. K. Howard, A. T. Phillips, Sidney Guenard, Sr., Fred Holt, F. O. Blair, Mr. Sykes, George Bishop, and W. B. Ragland, Sr. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Blairs in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blair, Frances Dec. 01, 1896 - Dec. 20, 1897 Daughter of Thomas & Kate Blair

Blake in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blake, Tressie 1875 - 1925

Blanchard, Katherine (Miss)
TEACHERS: Miss Katherine Blanchard was hired as band director for the Lake Providence High School on Oct. 2, 1941. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Blanchfield in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blanchfield, infant (died on Oct. 17, 1892, 4 yr old dau. of Mr. & Mrs. Blanchfield; NEWSPAPERS)

Blantons in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blanton, Florence A. Feb. 29, 1869 - April 09, 1928
Blanton, Georgia (see Long, Georgia Blanton)
Blanton, John A. Dec. 29, 1902 - Feb. 05, 1965
Blanton, Margaret (see Neill, Margaret Blanton)
Blanton, Vivian (see Goode, Vivian Blanton)
Blanton, William W. June 20, 1856 - Nov. 09, 1906

Bliss, Mrs.
FIRST TOWN FORMED: “In the local courthouse in Conveyance Book A., page 135, and datelined L. P., Louisiana, Nov. 23, 1833, is an article of agreement between John L. Martin and William B. Keene on the division of the front lots of the town, beginning at “Samuel Peck‘s store and running up the river Mississippi and down the bayou“ (Providence), divided into 15 lots of 50 foot frontage, and 210 feet back from the “levy“. These lots were listed numerically by purchasers. Some of the early owners were Samuel Rusk, Horace Prentice, Dr. Barton, Mrs. Bliss, Mrs. Overstreet, Dr. Prescott, Judge Felix Bosworth (his for a law office and also used temporarily as the first courthouse).“ Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Blockwood family [see Jones, Sam]
“Long time residents, and a large family, are the children and grand-children of the Sam Jones of Blount Street. The mother traces her ancestry back to the Blockwoods, who were slaves.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Blockwood, Janie [see Hawkins, Janie (Blockwood)]

Blockwood, Rev. & Mrs. Louis [see Hawkins, Janie]

Blounts in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Blount, Harry Wm., Jr. 12/26/1922 - 06/26/1977 - BKR 2 US Navy - WWII
Blount, William A. March 11, 1839 - June 11, 1905

Blount, Harry (Mrs.)
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: In Oct. 1966 the American Legion’s Unit #37 honored chartered members and past presidents. One of them honored was Mrs. Harry Blount. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Blount, W. A.
NEWSPAPERS; The Carroll Republican in 1871 appeared. Town meeting on April 1, 1873 lists the town officials: A. W. Roberts, Mayor; Mr. Blount, Marshall, and Fred Holbrook, Secretary.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
NEWSPAPER: June 7, 1873: Another team from Providence won the championship of north Louisiana in 1872. The players included W. A. Blount, Jim Leddy, Will Short, Thad Smith, Jim Aiklen, and Vail Montgomery.
ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF LAKE PROVIDENCE:
L. P. incorporated on July 3, 1876 with the Marshall & Tax Collector being W. A. Blount. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Boberg, Francis D. H.
CHURCHES; GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in village of Providence in 1846 the first services of the Episcopal Church was built just east of Minerva Sparrow’s Arlington Plantation. Because of the persistent flooding a new Grace Church was built on Lake Street in 1886. One of the clergymen in this new church was D. H. Boberg. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Boices in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Boice, Carrie W. April 03, 1875 - May 05, 1949
Boice, Wesley April 03, 1874 - Oct. 10, 1931 Husband of Carrie E. Boice

Boling, Vestine (see Fortenberry, Quinton & Vestine)

Boling in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Boling, Mary J. Jan. 30, 1863 - Mar. 27, 1942

Bolingers in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bolinger, Esther Cherry Sept. 20, 1907 - Jan. 11, 1981
Bolinger, Herman Marlon March 08, 1929 - Sept. 18, 1947

Bomar, Joseph H. D.
PLANTATIONS; PECAN GROVE: “ William M. Deeson sold this land in 1874 to William Jr. & Ann Adelia Waller, Jr.. A half interest was sold to Joseph H. D. Bowmar.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bond, Samuel
PLANTATIONS; LONGWOOD: PLANTATIONS; LONGWOOD: Longwood was some 4 miles above town, bounded on the front by the MS. River, upper side by Vista Plantation, on the lower side by Hopewell Plantation, and in the rear by Eyrie and Roberdale Plantations. It’s 1st owner was George M. Long, next owner was Samuel Bond. “1,534 acres and 107 slaves, corn fodder, 40 mules, cattle, valued at $48,000“ to Joseph R. Parks. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bonners in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bonner, Cassie Smiley Mary 09, 1896 - April 29, 1985 Age 88
Bonner, Nell Catherine Feb. 22, 1920 - Jan 02, 1978
Bonner, William Frank June 07, 1888 - May 06, 1965
Bonner, William Frank, Jr. Dec. 13, 1919 - Oct. 09, 1962

Bonner, H. R.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1848 & 1853: H. R. Bonner. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bonner, Neil Catherine
WOMEN OF E. C. PARISH TODAY (1977): Both are a capable team of accountants” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Bonner, W. F.
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members. Mrs. W. F. Bonner was one of the Charter Members of the church. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Booker, W. F.
EARLY LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion, local Post Number 37, Powell-Martin-Barrett, was named for three heroes who gave their lives for their country in WWI, was organized in 1920. No records are available concerning the Past Commanders of this Post, but records do refer to W. F. Booker as an early leader. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bosen, B. F.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1844: B. F. Bosen. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bosworth in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bosworth, Felix June 09, 1847 Major - USA - Died at Vera Cruz - age 38 yrs.

Bosworth, B. F. [see Bosworth, Felix]

Bosworth, Elizabeth (Beiller)
Elizabeth Beiller Bosworth, widow of Judge Felix Bosworth. [see Blackburn, Elizabeth (Beiller) Bosworth].

Bosworth, Felix“The population of Ouachita Parish has increased to 5,120 by 1830 and in 1832 Carroll Parish was carved out of Ouachita Parish by the State Legislature. Felix Bosworth was the first judge and he held court in the home of Harbird Hood in Lake Providence, which had been designated as the parish seat of government.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
EARLY SETTLERS: “Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833. Felix Bosworth and Bartlett Milton Browder were listed as partners of law in Providence that year.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CITIZENS WHO LEFT THEIR MARK: “Carroll Parish’s first Judge was Felix Bosworth, a young lawyer in his twenties. He was appointed to this position by the governor in 1832. Bosworth was married to Elizabeth Lester Bieller, and they had three children. Their home was Holly Place(now the site of the home of the Max Stockners). A toll bridge was located there to cross Tensas Bayou.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1840 & 1844: B. F. Bosworth. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
THE JUDGE IS REMEMBERED: “In a letter written by Jacob Owen concerning a visit in 1840 and published in The Carroll Democrat, Jan. 24, 1892, Owen wrote of Judge Bosworth: “During my visit to the parish, there was a wedding at ‘Arlington’ which worthy of mention.” (see also STORIES BY THE LOCAL FOLK: Felix Bosworth & the Wedding at Arlington) Major Felix Bosworth: Death: Jun. 9, 1847, Veracruz-Llave, Mexico
Died at age 38 while serving in the Mexican War. [Felix was a paymaster in the army by March 3, 1847 and had died June 9, 1847. EMAIL: JEANNE]
THE LAW; JUDGES: Felix Bosworth served as a parish judge, (office abolished after 1845) from 1832 - 1845, called the Judge of Record. He became a judge when he was only 23 years old. Later he fought in the Mexican War and lost his life. His son-in-law, Frank Voelker, Sr., succeeding him. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
“After Felix died, his widow married Henry B. Blackburn, a physician there in Carroll.” EMAIL: JEANNE
EMAIL: Subject: Re: Felix Bosworth Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 17:50:13 -0500
From: "J. Johnson" To: "sandy"
“Let me tell you a little about what you found....you found David Bosworth who I had no idea was in LA. He is Sarah's brother from KY. You found out that Ana Bosworth was born in GA....and that is quite a surprise and new fact. I suppose I need to head to GA before too long. You found Joseph Cox, a "relative" living in Sarah and her husband's household....indeed he IS a relative....Sarah's father had two wives and they were both Cox (I suspect sisters). I am not sure who Hugh Richardson is, but it helps to have the information because he may be one of the unknown males in Charles Richardson's household in the previous census. And the Bosworth marriage info. in Memphis, Tenn. has me really wondering....this week I found a Bosworth Civil War soldier who had enlisted at Memphis TN. The Blackburn death notice of the young daughter just about broke my heart and it is precious to have it in my family files.” JEANNE
Who is the W. Bosworth in 1847? Felix was a paymaster in the army by March 3, 1847 and had died June 9, 1847. The book states that Felix's sister was Sara E. Bosworth. I do have a Sara E. and she is the daughter of David Holcombe Bosworth of KY, who was the uncle of my A.J. However, I do not have a brother of hers named Felix, so is this new information which has not been found before by other Bosworth researchers. I also see the name RICHARDSON. One of my Nashville Bosworths (this would be either a sister of A. J. or a cousin, depending on who his father is) married a RICHARDSON from LA. One of the David Holcombe's daughters married Charles B. Richardson, according to my records, so this matches with the book. Makes sense that Felix may be David's son. Then I see the name GOODRICH. The Goodrich family were
Neighbors and friends of the Bosworths in Nashville. A Nashville Goodrich married
a Nashville Bosworth. Then the name of MOSS. A. J.'s stepdaughter married a Charles
MOSS in Nashville." JEANNE Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 06:56:07 -0400 CC: "Mom**"
“We know that a Sara Bosworth married a Richardson (Felix Bosworth was the host for the marriage and possibly the person officiating) but know little else about Sara. After Felix died, his widow married Henry B. Blackburn, a physician there in Carroll.”
However, what became of the children, Ana and Felis (Felix?) after 1850? I do not believe Henry is in the 1860 census and I believe I may have found another marriage for him in Kentucky: Dr. H. B. Blackburn, of Lake Providence, La., to Miss Mary C., daughter of Joseph Bryan, of Fayette County, Ky. M. Oct. 17, 1854.” JEANNE

Bosworth, Sarah E.
“We know that a Sara Bosworth was a sister to B. Felix Bosworth, and married a Richardson (Felix Bosworth was the host for the marriage and possibly the person officiating) but know little else about Sara.” EMAIL: JEANNE

Bosworth, W.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1847: W. Bosworth. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Botkin in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Botkin, Donal Bella "Don", Oct. 23, 1900 - Dec. 24, 1980, married Sara Regenold Schneider on Oct. 24, 1959

Boughton, Benjamin
EARLY SETTLERS: “Patrick Gilfoil in 1843 left Omega Plantation to his heirs--this being then a part of Carroll Parish. William Henderson owned 2.702 acres in the Henderson community, and Benjamin Boughton, a Methodist minister, owned 540 acres in the Nine Mile Reach--all dated 1843. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”.

Bowers in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bowers, Matthew Ellis Jan. 24, 1971 - Jan. 24, 1971

Bowers, Gerald Wayne
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. Gerald Wayne Bowers was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bowers, Gordon S. (Doctor)
CHURCHES; 1st BAPTIST: Organized in 1914, the church located on Davis Streets. Gordon S. Bowers has served as one of the Sunday School Directors. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bowers, Lillie G.
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Lilly G. Bowers. “A Place to Remember”

Bowet, W. H. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1846: Dr. W. H. Bowet. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bowie, James
Legendary Jim Bowie with his famed ‘bowie’ knife.
PLANTATIONS; CROW’S ROOST: “During the Spanish Regime, large land grants were made to favorites of Governor Miro, one, of two grants, was to Juan Gonzales in 1787. These two grants later bore the name Crow’s Roost, located below the town of Monticello. James Bowie purchased these tracts on July 10, 1827, according to Washita Parish records.” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bowie, John Jones
PLANTATIONS; BOWIE PLANTATION: “Bowie transactions from 1831 to 1851 and a succession in 1870. Records indicate that John J. Bowie and to this parish first. During Aug. 1843 John Jones Bowie made two land purchased in Carroll, which today bears he name of Bowie Plantation. The 1st purchase of 80 acres was from Jesse H. Chaney, which included Swan Lake Bayou. The 2nd purchase in Aug. 1843 was 639.22 acres from Mrs. Elizabeth M. Fretwell, wife of Cullen A. Fretwell. For the homestead, Bowie purchased the Robert McKee place in 1845. This land was “on the Dry Prong of Joe‘s Bayou, with 1 old carriage, wagon wheels, a feather bed, lots of books, farming utensils, shot gun, saddle tree, for the sum and price of $50.” for which he gave his note with Reason Bowie his security.
Marriage Book ’A’ contains the following information: “John J. Bowie is duly commissioned and sworn and hereby authorized to celebrate marriages within the parish of Carroll, whenever a special license shall be issued to him from the parish judge.
John J. Bowie, it appears, was married twice. His first wife was American Ann Watkins, mention in an early donation to their daughter, Harriet (Mrs. Joseph C. Hollingsworth) and his second wife was Mary C. Oliphant.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bowie, Mary C. (Oliphant)
Mary C. Oliphant was John Jones Bowie’s second wife, who made a bequest in 1851 while she and John J. were living at Ashton Plantation.” “A Place to Remember”, .

Bowie, Nancy (Lattimore)
PLANTATIONS; BOWIE PLANTATION: “Bowie transactions from 1831 to 1851 and a succession in 1870. Nancy Lattimore Bowie stayed the longest.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
Bowie’s marriage to Nancy Lattimore is confirmed by a suit dated 1844, vs. Reason Bowie: her husband: After her marriage to Nancy Lattimore, in ___ Co., Arkansas, petitioner inherited from her father certain property to wit: 5 slaves, which were brought into the marriage, and the sum of $2,000., petitioner is in danger of losing her paraphernalia and total property.” The plaintiff, Nancy Lattimore, recovered the $2,000 with 5% interest, and her 5 slaves. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
“The last parish record for Nancy Lattimore Bowie concerned the sale of her property to Hiram R. Lott in the 1870’s. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bowie, Reson / Reason Plesant
PLANTATIONS; BOWIE PLANTATION: “Bowie transactions from 1831 to 1851 and a succession in 1870. Reson Plesant Bowie was the most active.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
Reason Bowie’s marriage to Nancy Lattimore is confirmed by a suit dated 1844. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston
“Reason Bowie, his wife Nancy Lattimore Bowie and their descendants have left their family names and records for some 125 years [1977]. John Bowie sold the Fretwell property to his brother and sister-in-law, and they later bought the 80 acres John had bought from Jesse Chaney. This is the Bowie plantation of today, located on Louisiana Hwy 134. . “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
“Suits book of 1850 show that the commissioners appointed by the Police Jury to “contract for the building of a courthouse in the town of L. P. were: Thomas Robedeaux Patten, Joseph C. Hollingsworth, Loluis Selby, and Reason P. Bowie.” They contracted with James Fitzpatrick to build, and purchased 212,000 brick from R. M. Campbell to be used in the building. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bowles in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bowles, Ethel Kemp April 28, 1911 - Jan. 12, 1983 US Army - WWII
Bowles, Eugenia 1885 - 1964
Bowles, Frank F. (^James F.) 1885 - 1953
Bowles, Henry Ray Oct. 05, 1926 - Nov. 23, 1942

Bowman, Doctor
PHYSICIANS; FIRST MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1850: Dr. Philip M. Ryan, Dr. Hedrick, Drs. Graves and Bowman, Dr. Francis Janus, Dr. Samuel Gustine, Dr. R. L. Graves. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Boyd, Franklin V.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members was Franklin V. Boyd . From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Boyd, H. G.
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. One of the former pastors of the church was H. G. Boyd. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Boyd, Ruby (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; SONDHEIMER BAPTIST: This church was organized April 15, 1940. One of the 10 Charter Members was Mrs. Ruby Boyd. Rev. T H. Mercer was the first pastor. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Boyd, Tommie
CHURCHES; SONDHEIMER BAPTIST: This church was organized April 15, 1940. One of the 10 Charter Members was Tommie Boyd. Rev. T H. Mercer was the first pastor. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Boyett, Reverend
CHURCHES; LAKE SIDE BAPTIST: First called 7th Street Baptist, because of location, it was organized in 1957. One of the pastors was Reverend Boyett. The present minister [1977] is Rev. Roderick Herrington in the new church located on Schneider Lane, near the lake. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Boyett, Robert J.
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWII: Boyett, Robert J., Pvt., Died of Wounds.

Boyette family
FORMATION OF THE COMMUNITIES, LANE’S FERRY:
A ferry connecting the two Carroll on the Bayou Macon was called Lane’s Ferry. It was a farming community with families such as the Ratcliffs, Jones, and Boyettes that settled there early and still remain through several generations. “A Place To Remember”, Pinkston

Boyte, Frank
CHURCHES; LANE’S FERRY BAPTIST: Official records mention this church on December 24, 1934 when C. H. Neely of Oak Grove sold the land on the Oak Grove / L. P. highway at the Macon Bridge. Frank Boyte was one of the Deacons of the church. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Brackin, Charles Ray
PARISH ATTORNEY; 1969: C harles R. Brackin. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
LAW: W. B. Ragland, Jr., Charles Brackin and James Crigler work at Frank Voelker‘s law firm. [1977]. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
LAW: Charles Ray Brackin, 3rd member of the firm of Voelker, Ragland, and Brackin, Attorneys, is a Texan and a former Mechanical Engineer. Charles was born in Beaumont and graduated from the University of Southwestern LA in Engineering, and later took a law degree from Loyola University. He was in the U. S. Air Force in 1951 - 1952. He first practiced law in Gramercy, LA., and came to E. Carroll in 1969. He and his wife, the former Lilla Dukes, an East Carroll girl, and daughter of Luther and Lois Dukes of Transylvania, have one daughter, Lida, a student at Northeast University. Lilla, an L. S. U. graduate, is the parish supervisor of lunchroom programs for the public school system and is active in the Junior Auxiliary.
First serving as assistant District Attorney here, Mr. Brackin became D.A. in 1976. His activities include membership and office in professional organizations, in the American Legion, the Rotary Club, President elect for 1977, the Farm Bureau and the Baptist Church and its choir. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Brackin, Lilla (Dukes)
Lilla Dukes, an East Carroll girl, and daughter of Luther and Lois Dukes of Transylvania, married Charles Ray Brackin. Lilla, an L. S. U. graduate, is the parish supervisor of lunchroom programs for the public school system and is active in the Junior Auxiliary. Charles and Lilla have a daughter, Lida, a student at Northeast University. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Bradford, Robert
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st Trustees; Robert Bradford, Joseph LeBeau, and Michael Brown, and Chaplain; Rev. Patrick J. Murphy. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic projects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Bradley, Raymond
CHURCHES; SONDHEIMER BAPTIST: This church was organized April 15, 1940. Rev. T H. Mercer was the first pastor. On Nov. 18, 1962, celebrating its 22nd year the Deacons of the church that year was H. N. Pippen, P. S. Lee, Harry Murray, Raymond Bradley, and C. O. Beck. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Bradley, Walter“In 1874 a small, frame building was built near the site of Mr. Walter Bradley’s present home. This building was occupied by Mrs. Louisa Frances Pulley, who taught school in her home. Her only pupils so far as we could learn were the Layman children.” “Between the Rivers”, McKoin.

Bradley, William
LAWLESSNESS AND VIOLENCE: During the reconstruction years the a number of indictments increased, though most of the suspects fled the country, such as William Bradley, alias “Pin Hook Bill”. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bradshaw, Hugh (Rev.)
CHURCHES; PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF L. P.: On land first donated by Govy Hood in 1852, Rev. Hugh Bradsahw had the dedication of the new brick church on Nov. 24, 1963, with Earl Wiggins and David Shepperson participating. A Memorial Prayer Chapel in 1975 was dedicated in the memory of the late Harry Shields of Stamboul Plantation. Paul Snellgrove is the present pastor. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Bramlett, Ernest (Mr. & Mrs.)
CHURCHES; TRANSYLVANIA BAPTIST: On May 7, 1939 Rev. Homer Mercer and Rev. A. L. Russell aided in organizing this church. Two of the thirty-nine charter members was Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Bramlett. Present pastor is H. D. Stakes [1977].“A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Branches in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Branch, Charles Ernie Nov. 11, 1947 - Nov. 11, 1947
Branch, Rebecca (see Blackburn, Rebecca)

Brandenburgs in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Brandenburg, Ellen C. Aug. 22, 1895 - Mar. 19, 1980

Brannums in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Brannum, An 1871 - 1926
Brannum, Elizabeth Hearns, Nov. 28, 1900 - Oct. 18, 1954
Brannum, Martha, born 1845, died Oct. 4, 1900
Brannum, Minnie P., 04/18/1871 - 07/16/1921
Brannum, William Anthony Oct. 17, 1895 - July 17, 1943

Brannum, Albertine B. (Doctor) [see Hayes, Albertine]

Brannum, Elizabeth (see Trass, Elizabeth “Liz”)
*NOTE: There were two Elizabeth Brannums, mother and daughter.

Brannum, Elizabeth (Hearns) [see Brannum, William Anthony]

Brannum, Martha [see Christon, Martha]

Brannum, William Anthony
William Anthony Brannum lived in Lake Providence from 1896 - 1943. He was an insurance salesman and later founded his own business, Brannum Funeral Home. He attended Tuskegee Institute and a school of embalming. He was active in civic, church and professional groups.
W. A. Brannum and Elizabeth Hearns were married in Lake Providence, and their three daughters are (1) Albertine Brannum, (2) Martha Brannum, and (3) Elizabeth Brannum. A street east of Gould Blvd. bears the name Brannum in recognition of the family.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brasher, Hurby
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWII: Brasher, Hurby, S SG., KIA

Brasher in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Brasher, William C. May 06, 1902 - Oct. 13, 1955

Braswells in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Braswell, Andrew Melvin Jan. 17, 1891 - July 22, 1961 DM W/ ~
Effie Jones Braswell - DADDY - Married Oct. 18, 1918
Braswell, Effie Jones Dec. 03, 1899 - Jan. 28, 1987 DM W/ ~
Andrew Melvin Braswell - MOTHER - Married Oct. 18, 1918
Braswell, George Wayne Oct. 10, 1941 - Jan. 04, 1957 "Sonny Boy"

Braswell, Mr.
Braswell, grandfather of Mrs. Dee Briggs Williams of Oak Grove. Mrs. Williams says her maternal grandparents were Darrell and Mary Ann Landfair Wright, the latter being from Baton Rouge. They came to the east banks of the Macon River before the Civil War. Mrs. Williams’ mother was Sara Elizabeth Wright, born and reared on a plantation across the Macon River near Poverty Point. Their home was destroyed by the Yankees during the Civil War. The family fled to Texas as so man others did during this time. They never returned, and Mrs. Williams said she never knew what became of their land.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
“Soldiers, who had left the area to fight, began to come home, some maimed, others ill, and all damaged by the horrors of war, lack of food, & clothing. Many did not come home. Two who did not return were Asbury Cawthorn and John McIntyre. One who did return was Henry De Los Briggs. He had been a merchant and school teacher before going to war; however, soon after returning, he decided to change his occupation. He married in Floyd in 1871 and moved to land he had acquired northeast of the present site of Forest. Here he build a home, owned a farm, built a school house, cotton gin and general mercantile store, and helped restore the South as others did.” Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”

Breazeale, Carmen (Miss)
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: Some of the well-remembered teachers in 1913 were Miss Isabel Ransdell, Mrs. Eugene Guenard, Miss Narcisse Blackburn, Miss Bessie Blackburn, Miss Myrtle Rice, and Miss Carmen Breazeale. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Breckinridge, Mary
Mary Breckinridge, born in 1881 to an influential Kentucky family, enjoyed a privileged childhood and education in the U.S. and Europe. Her father was the U.S. ambassador to Czar Nicholas II of Russia from 1894 to 1897. In 1906, Breckinridge was widowed at age 26. Following the death of both her children at an early age, Breckinridge dedicated her life to improving the health of women and children. She became a registered nurse in 1910, at St. Luke's Hospital in New York. While working in France during World War I. Breckinridge ran the Frontier Nursing Service until her death in 1965. There is a stamp with her likeness that I will include here as I get to doing the photos.
Writer of “Wide Neighborhood”, which recounts her childhood memories of her uncle Joseph Carson’s Oasis Plantation in Mississippi. Another relative, Dr. J. H. D. Bowman owned Carroll Parish’s Pecan Grove Plantation, adjacent to the Oasis Plantation, before the war. [I will add excerpts of people from this book also, when I get it.]

Breithaupt, Caroline [see Benjamin, William]

Briant, Belle (Miss) [some might spell it Bryant]
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: The faculty of the L.P. school in 1907 - 1908 was 1st Assistant; Miss Lucie Nunn, 7th & 8th Grades; Miss Irma Williams, 5th & 6th grades; Miss Belle Briant, 3rd & 4th grades; Miss Eula Bean, Literature, Expression, & Physical Culture; Miss Nettie Brown, Music; Miss Minnie Collum. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Briggs, Henry
Soldiers, who had left the area to fight, began to come home, some maimed, others ill, and all damaged by the horrors of war, lack of food, & clothing. Many did not come home. One who did return was Henry De Los Briggs. He had been a merchant and school teacher before going to war; however, soon after returning, he decided to change his occupation. He married in Floyd in 1871 and moved to land he had acquired northeast of the present site of Forest. Here he build a home, owned a farm, built a school house, cotton gin and general mercantile store, and helped restore the South as others did. From Florence Stewart McKoin’s book “Between the Rivers”
Mrs. Dee Williams of Oak Grove tell that her grandfather came to Floyd before the Civil War and during his first years there taught school.

Brocks in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Brock, Elizabeth E. Died Feb. 03, 1902
Brock, John L. [July 27, 1890, aged 24 years; from newspaper]
Brock, Norris Williamson 1921 - 1948 MOTHER

Brock, A. G. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: 1878: (Quarantine)-- Dr. Richard P. D. Hays, Dr. A. G. Brock, Drs. Hought and Bernard. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brock, Edna Aurelia (Bishop)
BIOS: Edna Brock was the daughter of George Poole Bishop and the former Eva Blanche Amos. Oct. 14, 1953 Edna Bishop married Joseph L. Brock Sr. Edna Brock first began work in the Clerk of Court‘s office in Dec. 1944, and she was elected Clerk on May 29, 1952, a post she has held continuously till about 2009. In 1973, she was named Clerk of the Quarter by the Louisiana Clerk of Court’s Association. From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLERK OF COURT; 1952: Edna Bishop, 6th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
CLERK OF COURT; 1956: Edna (Bishop) Brock, 6th Dist. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brock, Joseph Lawrence
BIOGRAPHIES: In 1942, Joseph L. Brock, Sr., came to East Carroll from Franklin Parish. He was born on May 29, 1920. Mr. Joseph L. Brock married Norris Williamson on January 1, 1943, and two children were born of this marriage, Joseph Lawrence “Larry“, Jr., “Larry“ and Sally Elizabeth. In 1948, Norris (Williamson) Brock died on Oct. 14, 1953. Joseph L. Brock then married Edna Aurelia Bishop. Mr. Brock is a former teacher in the East Carroll Parish School system and a Senior Field Officer with the Production Marketing Association. He and his son are engaged in the production of cotton and soybeans in E. C. and Franklin Parishes. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Brock, Henry Joseph
BIOS: Henry Joseph Brock and Lillie Vera (Young) Brock are the parents of Joseph L. Brock, Sr. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Brock, Joseph "Larry" Lawrence, Jr.
BIOS: Joseph Lawrence “Larry” Brock, Jr. is the son of Joseph Lawrence Brock, Sr. and Norris (Williamson) Brock. He was born on Dec. 15, 1943.
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Joseph Brock, Warden. This fraternal organization of Catholic men actively works with the church, school, community, youth, and patriotic projects. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Brock, Lillie Vera (Young) [see Brock, Henry Joseph]

Brock, Norris (Williamson) [see Brock, Joseph Lawrence]

Brock, Sallie/Sally Elizabeth [see Brock, Joseph]
BIOS: Mr. Joseph L. Brock married Norris Williamson on January 1, 1943, and two children were born of this marriage, Joseph Lawrence “Larry“, Jr., “Larry“ and Sally Elizabeth Brock. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Brooks in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Brooks, Elizabeth S. Nov. 22, 1850 - Oct. 30, 1911
Brooks, Gordon 1885 - 1934
Brooks, James Arthur June 23, 1923 - July 12, 1924
Brooks, Ruby 01/14/ 1887 - 07/13/1895 Eldest dau. of J. A. & B. S. Brooks

Brooks, George
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWI: George Brooks, Pvt. 1st Class, died of Pneumonia, May 11, 1919.

Browder, Bartlett Milton
EARLY SETTLERS: “Other early names include James J. Chewning and Stephen B. Linnard listed as merchants at Providence in 1833. Felix Bosworth and Bartlett Milton Browder were listed as partners of law in Providence that year.” From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1838: B. M. Browder. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Browder, Florence Adell
When Matilda McGraw Childers Patten died on Feb. 7, 1852, she left her estate to her two nieces, Florence Adell Browder and Ann Morehouse Pilcher, both daughters of her sister, Ann. Ann’s daughter, Florence Adell Browder, by her first husband, Dr. William Browder, was given “all my land and money in the state of Tennessee”. Ann’s second marriage was to Mason Pilcher, and their daughter, Ann Morehouse Pilcher, received all land and money in Louisiana. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Browder, Nannie A. [see Campbell, Robert L.]

Browns in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Brown, "Mr."* Died on July 24, 1889 (Gen. Mngr for S. B. Mobberly; newspaper)
Brown, Alice Lavonne Dec. 06, 1951 - Sept. 30, 1954
Brown, Amelia W. Sept. 06, 1901 - Jan. 09, 1983
Brown, Annette (see Evans, Annette Brown)
Brown, Bea Nov. 27, 1941 - April 20, 1987, CFH Records
Brown, Carl T. July 27, 1894 - April 06, 1952
Brown, Carrie Lee July 30, 1900 - July 20, 1984
Brown, Edna May Keller Born July 17, 1910 DM W/Joseph Patten Brown
Brown, Ellen (see Stockner, Ellen Brown)
Brown, J. E. "DOC", Aug. 26, 1905 - April 21, 1978 DM W/Susan Hart Brown
Brown, J. Howard, 1926 - June 26, 1985
Brown, John Ernest Aug. 26, 1905 - April 21, 1978 CFH Records,
No MKR, husband of Susan
Brown, John Ernest Dec. 23, 1878 - May 06, 1932 "Doctor"
Brown, Joseph Patten Dec. 10, 1902 - Nov. 16, 1980 DM W/Edna May Keller Brown
Brown, Lillian B. May 21, 1884 - Dec. 11, 1963 DM W/ Mark Hanna Brown
Brown, Mark Hanna Jan. 16, 1872 - Nov. 28, 1951 DM W/Lillian B. Brown
Brown, Narcissa Williams 01/16/1872 - 11/28/1951 Born at Sherwood Plt., E. C. Parish, died at Gossyppia Plt, Lake Providence, La.
Brown, Nina 11/24/1881 - 03/21/1889 2nd Dau. of W. S. & Nina G. Brown
Brown, Nina Goodrich Oct. 05, 1854 - May 15, 1931
Brown, Pearl Fisher Sept. 06, 1886 - Sept. 20, 1957
Brown, Rebecca (see Thomas, Rebecca Brown)
Brown, Susan Hart Sept 10, 1907 - Jan. 27, 1990 DM W/J. E. "Doc" Brown
Brown, William Dennis, Sr. Dec. 24, 1874 - Mar. 01, 1951 Born Houma, Terrebonne Par., La., died at Gossyppia Plantation
Brown, William S. 1851 - 1904
Brown, Willie F. May 29, 1886 - Jan. 26, 1888 Son of W. S. & Nina G. Brown

Brown family
BLACK CHURCHES; ROSE HILL MISSIONARY BAPTIST was first on LA. Hwy 65, afterwards building & relocating when it was destroyed by a storm onto the Panola Plantation - land donated by the Brown family. Two pastors that have served the church are T. H. Turner and Fred Jones. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Brown, Doctor
L.P.H.S. FOOTBALL: Frank Byerley returned to L. P. around 1920. He became head football coach at L.P.H.S. His championship team in 1922 included “Doc“ Brown, playing back. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS: Early 1900’s: Dr. Brown. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Alma
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR; CHAPTER #42: It was organized on Sept. 26, 1907. The first meeting was at the Pecan Grove Lodge Hall. In 1915 there were 54 members. Over the years one of the Worthy Matrons was Alma Brown. “A Place to Remember”

Brown, Amanda
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the Afrocan Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, C. R. (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members. Mrs. C. R. Brown was the first President. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Dennis [see Brown, William Denis Sr.]
L.P.H.S. FOOTBALL: Head coach Frank Byerley’s 1922 championship team included Dennis Brown. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, E. Wayles
“A firm of attorneys that ranks among the ablest in Louisiana is that of E. W. and P. N. Browne of Shreveport. The senior partner has been in practice twenty years, is a native of Louisiana and a former member of the State Senate. Mr. Browne also has offices in New Orleans, where he is associated with Mr. W. A. Porteous. Jr. E. Wayles Browne was horn at Lake Providence in East Carroll Parish in 1879, son of Benjamin F. and Ella (Eppes) Browne. His father was born in Alabama, and from that state moved to East Carroll Parish after the Civil war. The maternal grand father of E. Wayles Browne was John Wayles Eppes, a prominent early citizen of what was then Carroll Parish where he located in the early '40s and became a slave owner and extensive planter. E. Wayles Browne was liberally educated, taking his academic course in the Louisiana State University, and his law course in Tulane University. He was graduated with the LL. B. degree in 1904, and after his admission to the bar, practiced at Lake Providence, his native town, but since May, 1906, has had his home in Shreveport. His brother and partner is Percy N. Browne, and their law offices are at the Slattery Building. Mr. Browne was elected a member of the House of Representatives of the State Legislature in 1917 to till the unexpired term of J. McW. Ford, and he was a member of the session of 1918. He was elected to the State Senate without opposition, serving in the sessions of 1920 and 1922. In both branches of the Legislature his influence and work were notable, and his name is associated with many of the beneficial laws enacted during those years. He was the father and secured the passage of the Abatement Act, popularly known as the Injunction Act, a war measure, and he also sponsored and secured the passage of the Carbon Black Act and the Building Lien Law. Mr. Browne is affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and is a member of the Civitan Club. He married Miss Grace Hall Long. Her father, the late B. W. Long, of Marshall, Texas, was for a number of years clerk of the courts of Harrison County in that state. They have two children: E. Wayles Browne, Jr., now fifteen years of age, who will graduate in 1925 from the Shreveport high school, and Grace, aged twelve years. Mr. Browne is a member of the American Bar Association and the Louisiana State Bar Associations and has held offices in both of these organizations. NOTE: The referenced source contains a black and white photograph of the subject with his/her autograph. A History of Louisiana, (vol. 2), p. 68, by Henry E. Chambers. Published by The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, 1925.”
E. Carroll, then Caddo Parish, Louisiana Submitted by Mike Miller 8/01
Submitted to the LAGenWeb Archives Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/la/lafiles.htm

Brown, Elodie
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1901 Miss Eddie Bass, Miss Carrie Byerly and Miss Elodie Brown were new teachers. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Brown, Ernest Joseph
INTERNET: Born in 1906 Lake Providence, La. Began his practice of law in Buffalo, N.Y. in 1931, of tax and corporate matters. He also teaches at the University of Buffalo Law School. He got his AB at Princeton, his LL.B. in 1931 at Harvard. From 1942 - 1945 he was Captain in the Office of Strategic Services.

Brown, Frank
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: “Moses Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in L. P. on Dec. 22, 1934. One of it’s charter members was Mrs. Frank Brown.“ From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston

Brown, Grady Wyly (Mrs.)
CLUBS; L. P. JUNIOR AUXILIARY: “The L. P. Junior Auxiliary was organized in Sept. 1962. Serving as a president was Mrs. Grady W. Brown. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, H. N.
CHURCHES; METHODIST CHURCH OF L. P.: The Women‘s Society of Christian Service, formed in 1940, of former Missionary Society and the Ladies Aid members. Mr. H. N. Brown, the Pastor’s wife was one of the Charter Members. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, J. P.
E. C. PARISH HOSPITAL: The hospital opened in January 1955. Its construction was made possible by the donation of 10 acres on North Hood Street by Mrs. Elsie Sitton. J. P. Brown was one of the first Hospital Board members. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, James Howard
MASONIC LODGES: Pecan Grove Lodge Number 222 was located at Goodrich Landing, established on May 5, 1875, next it was located upstairs at a meeting hall, and lastly being in a new building located at Lake & Hood Streets. James Howard Brown was one of the Worshipful Masters of the Pecan Grove Lodge. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Brown, Joane (see Rushing, W. P., Jr.)

Brown, John Ernest (Dr.)
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with E. J. Hamley as one of the Directors. The 2nd President was R. J. Walker, and J. Sidney Guenard was the 3rd President, serving in 1908, with Herman Stein as vice-president. One of the presidents of the bank was Dr. J. E. Brown from 1920 -1932. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
THE BROWN FAMILY - PLANTERS - BANKERS - PHYSICIAN: William Denis Brown was of French decent. He was a son of Annette Burgire and Abraham Brown. He was one of 11 children. When William Denis, Sr. purchased the Providence Drug Store in 1904 he became a partner with his brother in this firm. (see also Brown, William Denis)

Brown, Mark H.
BLACK CHURCHES; OAKLAND RIDGE MISSIONARY BAPTIST first held services in the homes of several families living at Desha Deadening. When Mark Brown tore down an old hotel, he gave the lumber to build a church - the women pulling the nails and the men built the church. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the Charter Members was Mark H. Brown. From "A Place to Remember" , Georgia Pinkston

Brown, Martha (Wyly)
EDUCATION: In 1946 Martha Wyly Brown was on the School Board. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Michael (Mrs.)
CLUBS; L. P. JUNIOR AUXILIARY: “The L. P. Junior Auxiliary was organized in Sept. 1962. Serving as a president was Mrs. Michael Brown. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Narcisse
1929 ECHO: Narcisse was a Senior in 1929 at East Carroll Parish High School. "As sweet and white and delicate as the flower for which se is named--but when she starts laughing, there is no stopping her till she runs down." She is in the Choral Club, Booster Club, and the Secretary of the Annual.
1910 E. C. CENSUS: William and Narcisse have a daughter named Annete M., 8 yrs old, along with the same children mentioned below in the 1930 Census. Of course, Narcisse, Ellin, and Roebecker haven't been born yet.
1930 E. C. CENSUS: She has her mother's name, Narcisse. In 1930 she had the following siblings living in the same house: Owen S.; 20, Joseph P.; 27, who was a farm manager, William H.; 23, who farmed, Ellin M.; 16, Roebecker E. (which I believe is suppose to be Rebecca); 15.

Brown, Narcisse (Williams) [see also Brown, William Denis Sr.]
THE BROWN FAMILY - PLANTERS - BANKERS - PHYSICIAN: Narcisse Williams was a descendant of the John B. & Narcisse Patten Williams family of Sherwood Plantation. She married William Denis Brown, Sr. As the children came along, Narcisse, the mother, and the ones of school age stayed in L. P. for them to attend school. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Nettie
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: The faculty of the L.P. school in 1907 - 1908 was 1st Assistant; Miss Lucie Nunn, 7th & 8th Grades; Miss Irma Williams, 5th & 6th grades; Miss Belle Briant, 3rd & 4th grades; Miss Eula Bean, Literature, Expression, & Physical Culture; Miss Nettie Brown, Music; Miss Minnie Collum. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Brown, Owen Stewart
NEWSPAPERS; The Banner-Democrat was owned by Owen S. Brown. He was also the publisher and editor. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
TRANSPORTATION; ROADS: Before the Civil War the main route westward from Providence was Hood’s Lane which is near the present home of Owen S. Brown. It intersects the lake road, Hwy 65, and goes to Caney Creek. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, Philip
CLUBS; KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS #5721: The present council received its charter in June, 1965. Richard Hamilton served as Chairman, working with Father Murphy, the local priest. There were 45 charter members. One of the 1st officers was Deputy Grand Knight; Philip Brown. All Catholic men 18 years or older may join. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
THE FISCHER-PITTMAN-BROWN HOUSE OR PHILLIP‘S FOLLY; A UNIQUE HOUSE: Stuart Pittman, Jr. sold the home in September 1968 to Philip Brown. “Philip named his house, during the painful years of remodeling, refinishing furniture and all the accompanying agonies, “Philip’s Folly”, but to Philip, Gayle, and the seven Brown children, it has become a real home, a new, yet old, structure harboring countless memories.” “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston. [have picture of home]

Brown, Reverend
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was Brown. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Brown, Sylvester
BLACK CHURCHES; EVENING STAR MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH NO.2: Established in 1935 on No Mistake Plantation, LA, Hwy 134. The people living on the plantation built the church with the permission of the owner M. Sam Mitchiner. The first pastor was Frank Davis, succeeded by S. Jackson, G. C. Gable, Ted Taylor, & Sylvester Brown. The present pastor is Frank W. Wilson.[1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Brown, Wayles S.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1888: Wayles S. Brown. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, William Denis, III
William Denis Brown, III, is the son on William Denis Brown, Jr. and Martha (Wyly), who was the daughter of James Grady Wyly. He is an attorney and former State Senator. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Brown, William Denis, Jr./II [see also Wyly, Martha]
William Denis Brown, Jr., met and married Martha Wyly. She was the daughter of James Grady Wyly and Matye Belser who was married in 1909. Martha and William Denis Brown, Jr. had four children: (a) William Denis Brown, III, (b) Grady Wyly Brown, (c) Philip B. Brown, and (d) Martha K. Brown.

Brown, William Dennis, Sr.
THE WILLIAM DENIS BROWN FAMILY - PLANTERS - BANKERS - PHYSICIAN: William Denis Brown was of French decent. He was a son of Annette Burgire and Abraham Brown. He was a native of Houma, Louisiana, and was one of 11 children. He came to work as a surveyor in L. P. in 1898 with his uncle W. S. Brown. He married Narcisse Williams in 1900 and they had 8 children: Annette Brown (Mrs. C. Rupert Evans); Joseph Patten Brown; William Denis Brown, Jr. and John Ernest Brown, twins; Owen Stewart Brown, Narcisse Brown (Mrs. Tripp Martin); Ellen Brown (Mrs. Max Stocker); and Rebecca Brown (Mrs. L. P. Thomas). There are 17 grand children and 44 great grandchildren. He purchased the Providence Drug Store in 1904, and became a partner with his brother, Dr. John Ernest in this firm. [see also Brown, John Ernest]
PLANTATIONS; GOSSYPPIA / GOSSYPIA: After Dr. Nathan G. and Mariann Goffe, fleed for safety during the Civil War, and the next recorded owner of Gossypia is a family from Kentucky named Newcomb. They were followed by Jacob Owen, also of Kentucky. Then in 1896, Mr. Dennis Brown of south Louisiana bought this place. Early after the turn of the century he lived there with his bride, the former Narcisse Williams. A grandson, Michael Brown, was making his home there when the house burned in 1960. It has now been replaced with a modern home structure, in 2009 Michael and his wife were still living there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
BANKS; THE 1ST NATIONAL BANK: Opening it doors on July 14, 1902 with E. J. Hamley as one of the Directors. The 2nd President was R. J. Walker, and J. Sidney Guenard was the 3rd President, serving in 1908, with Herman Stein as vice-president. One of the presidents of the bank was William Dennis Brown from 1933 - 1946. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
NORTH LOUISIANA FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION: It had it’s start in 1933 during the depression. One of the First Board of Directors included William D. Brown. W. D. Brown was also elected the first Vice-President. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Brown, W. S.
E. C. LIBRARY: A local newspaper mentioned donations from W. S. Brown to the public library, early as Feb. 21, 1884. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Browne, Percy Newby of E. Carroll Parish, LA. Submitted by Mike Miller 8/01 Submitted to the LAGenWeb Archives Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/la/lafiles.htm
“Percy Newby Browne, lawyer, with offices in the Slattery Building at Shreveport, has enjoyed many congenial and useful relations with his community in his profession and through various civic and social organizations. Mr. Browne was born at Lake Providence, Louisiana, son of Benjamin F. and Laura Ella (Eppes) Browne. His great-grandfather on both sides participated in the Revolutionary war. His paternal grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812, being an officer under General Scott on the campaign against the Creek Indians in 1837. Benjamin Browne, now eighty-three years of age is a veteran of the Civil war, having entered the Confederate army at the age of eighteen. He fought under Lee in Virginia as an artilleryman until wounded at second battle of Fredericksburg, after which he was commissioned and assigned special duty in Alabama in the enlistment department. Laura Ella Eppes, mother of P. N. Browne, was born at Eppes, Louisiana, near Delhi, daughter of Dr. John Wayles Eppes, and granddaughter of James B. Eppes of the distinguished Eppes family of Virginia. A daughter of John and Martha Wayles, Martha Wayles, married John Skelton, and after his death she became the wife of Thomas Jefferson, the great Virginia statesman. Percy N. Browne was educated in grammar and high schools, took special work in Columbia University at New York, and after his admission to the bar engaged in practice, being now a member of the law firm, E. W. and P. N. Browne. This firm handles a large general law business and acts as attorney for the American National Bank of Shreveport and for various insurance companies. Mr. Browne, though past draft age at the outbreak of the World war, volunteered as a private, and had been ordered to the Field Artillery Training Camp at Camp Taylor at Louisville, Kentucky,. at the time of the armistice. He is a democrat, a member of the Masonic Order, belongs to the Shreveport City Chub, is a charter member of McFarland Post No. 14 of the American Legion at Shreveport, and Shreveport Voiture of Las Societe National Des 40 Hommes Et 8 Chevaux; he belongs to the Isaac Walton League of America, the Shreveport Chamber of Commerce, the Louisiana Bar Association and is a member of the Board of Stewards of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Shreveport, and was one of the organizers of the Four Square Bible Class which has a membership of over one thousand. Mr. Browne married at Shreveport, June 15, 1920, Miss Honora Palmer, who was born in Shreveport, July 16, 1899, daughter of the late Sterling and Leola (Scott) Palmer, and grand-daughter of Doctor J. J. Scott, a prominent pioneer of Shreveport, who settled in that city shortly after the Civil war and was influentially identified with many phases of the early history of northwestern Louisiana. Mrs. Browne has two brothers, who were soldiers in the World war, Eugene Palmer and Sterling Palmer. Eugene Palmer was overseas a year, being at the front at the time of the armistice. Mrs. Browne is a member of the Shreveport Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and the present recording secretary of the chapter. She is a member of the Woman's Department Club of Shreveport, and the First Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Browne have one daughter, Eugenia Scott Browne, born September 6, 1921, at Shreveport.”
A History of Louisiana, (vol. 2), pp. 318-319, by Henry E. Chambers. Published by The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, 1925.

Brownes in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Browne, Esther Whittington 1885 - 1953

Bruce, Daniel H.
EAST CARROLL CASUALTIES; WWI: Daniel H. Bruce, Pvt., KIA on Nov. 10, 1918.

Bruit family
EARLY SETTLEMENTS: “John Millikin, registrar of the land office, knew of a Mrs. Bruit who resided on the river a mile below the mouth of Stock/Stack Island Lake. Other early names are Hugh White, Samuel White and Herbert/Harbird Hood, who were granted land here in 1812.
William Barker and two or three persons named Dempsey were reported to be living on the lake in 1813 and raised corn and other produce. One of them, Joe Dempsey, hunted along the banks of what is now called Joe‘s Bayou, which was named for this early hunter.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Brundage, Alfred (Union Doctor)
FEDERAL OCCUPATION OF CARROLL PARISH: On Feb. 24, 1863, Dr. Alfred Brundage of the 32nd Ohio Regiment, wrote his wife “We are encamped on the bank of L. P., three miles from the river…” [lengthy letter] “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bruners in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bruner, Lillie Mae Sept. 22, 1891 - July 03, 1981

Bryan, W.
PARISH ATTORNEY: 1843 & 1847: W. Bryan. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Bryants in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Bryant, Vickey Diana Aug. 14, 1958 - 1961
Bryant, Bettie (see Grice, Bettie Bryant)

Bryant, Oscar O. (Rev)
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CHURCHES; NEW HOPE BAPTIST: Located near Monticello on Hwy 877 it traces its beginning to 1940. Rev. O. O. Bryant served as the full-time pastor. M. J. Crow also served as a pastor there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CHURCHES; CORBIN’S FERRY BAPTIST: Organized in 1939 with Rev. V. W. Fairchild its first pastor. Other pastors for this period were Oscar Bryant and A. B. Odom. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston [after 1947 was known as FREE WILL BAPTIST]

Buchanan, Catherine (Miss)
EDUCATION; TEACHERS: In July of 1920 one of the teachers employed for Lake Providence was Miss Catherine Buchanan. “A Place to Remember”

Buchanan, Joe
HOTELS/MOTELS: Howard White is owner and manager of White’s Motel and Restaurant which formerly was Dick Kent’s restaurant. It was built by Joe Buchanan in 1949. Howard White making the purchase in 1957. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Buchanan, Webster
THE LAW; LAW AND ORDER, 1883: “Sheriff Powell arrested on Saturday night one Webster Buchanan, who was indicted at our last term of court upon the charge of borrowing a mule, while the owner was absent, which he kept in his possession for several months, and owing to his carelessness and short memory, neglected to return. The prisoner is now in jail where he will be given an opportunity of refreshing his memory and explain the cause of his carelessness at our July court.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Buchanan, W. C.
“There was not much “taking” between the rivers, but occasionally there was a freight wagon or individual robbed and these incidents were unpunished. One night a freight wagon coming from Delhi to Floyd had stopped and choice bits of freight lifted by robbers, one being a case of whiskey belonging to W. C. Buchanan, a merchant in Floyd. Now, Mr. “Buck“ was a close friend of the James and Younger brothers. The wagon arrived in Floyd that night and the driver found Mr. Buck waiting for his freight. He told him what happened, but there was nothing for Mr. Buck could do but go to bed and wonder who did it. The next morning when he opened his store, there on the porch was his case of whiskey. Then he knew who the bandits were. When they found the case of whiskey belonged to their friend, they found a way to deliver it to him.” “Between the Rivers” McKoin
A NEW PARISH IS BORN: On Jan. 1, 1883 sold 1,020 acres of land located just north of the present site of Darnell, price $2,000. $1,000 cash in hand and $1,000 due Jan. 1884, at 8% interest. It was sold to M. C. Redmond, Sr. and W. C. Buchanan. This place was known as the Gaddis place. "Between the Rivers", McKoin

Bucks in Lake Providence Cemetery:
NEWSPAPER: March 2, 1876; Buck, Mr.

Buck, John L.
SETTLERS OF THE EARLY 1800’S:
“In the 1810 census was listed as the owner of Lookout Plantation, John L. Buck in 1826 owned Pecan Grove Plantation which he purchased from the U. S. government. Samuel Galloway, for whom Galloway Bayou is named, sold land in 1833 to William Henderson. John A. Love, a Methodist minister, in 1834 bought 726.66 acres at Patterson Point.” “Between the Rivers” Florence McKoin
PLANTATIONS; WILTON: This property, registered April 30, 1832, and shows 999 acres in Township 19, on the Mississippi River, adjoining the property of John L. Buck. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Buck, Mildred
PLANTATIONS: ERWIN: Mildred Buck of Evergreen Plantation, married Sentell Barber, who was the son of Susan Rebecca Sentell and Leonard Kellogg Barber. While on their honeymoon, Sentell rushed to the rescue when a swimming party yelled for help, the young bridegroom was drowned. “A Place to Remember” Georgia Pinkston.

Buckner, James H.
LAW; THE THREE COURTHOUSES; The 1st meeting of the Police Jury of the newly formed East Carroll Parish was held on Wednesday, May 30, 1877, at the Courthouse. Appointed to the Jury by Governor Francis T. Nichols was James H. Buckner. He was duly elected and qualified for the parish of Carroll, and held over by virtue of the law dividing the parish. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Buckner, Troy (Gardener)
BOOKS: Her father and mother are Isaac and Everlina Gardener. Brothers and sisters are Jessie, Isaiah (Man), Margaret, Bertha, Betty and Melda. Founder of “My Broken Wings Women Org” and writer. Her novel’s title: “A Bird in Flight”.

Bulls in L. P. Cememtery:
Bull, Francis Dane July 02, 1867 - July 29, 1939
Bull, Ruth R. Jan. 03, 1880 - June 15, 1954

Bunch, Hiram
PLANTATIONS: James E. Old tells of his arrival in 1824: “… After you left Berry and Balus Prince’s plantation (1,251 acres), the next man lived at Tensas and kept a ferry there, by the name of Hiram Bunch…” “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Bunley, Elias
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Other negroes of note were: Henry Hilliard, Tillman Banks, J. A. Gla, M. E. Massee, and Adolph Reese serving on the colored Levee Convention in Greenville, Mississippi; Rev. Smith, Elias Bunley and Amanda Brown who, in 1866 were licensed by the Afrocan Methodist Episcopal Church in Mississippi; and W. H. Hunter, a deputy sheriff and constable and collecting agent in 1883.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Burbank, Gary
THE GARY BURBANK STORY, by Greg Hoard. When he first came to the town of Lake Providence it was late, he asked for directions for a place to stay at a service station on the outskirt of the town. The man directed him to the Palamino Hotel.
When he arrived at KLPL, he met the boss, manager Gene Underwood. The control room was small, the studio smaller still. The disc jockey on the air was Lanny James, who Mr. Gene explained was a pillar of the community with kids, born and raised in L. P. and decided to stay, unlike most, Lanny, he added, pretty much kept things together at KLPL. “You can learn a lot from him”, Mr. Gene said.
“Five days a week for 27 years Gary Burbank turned it up & on for Cincinnati 50,000 watt WLW radio station, the last stop on a career that began in L. P., LA & took him for Jackson, MS., to Memphis, Detroit, Louisville, N.O. LA., and Tampa, FL.” “A Place to Remember by Georgia Pinkston.

Burger in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Burger, Mose 1856 - Oct. 18, 1911 Born at Knowxville, TN - Died at L. P., La.

Burgess, Clayton
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community. Other Charter Members include: Clayton Burgess, J. B. McPherson, Sr. Mrs. Jeff Burgess, Mrs. Roy Burgess, Sam H. King, Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Watts. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burgess, Inez
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community. In May 1973, at the 50th Anniversary of the church - charter member Inez Burgess was there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burgess, J. P.
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community, one of the pastors that served this church was J. P. Burgess. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burgess, Jeff (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community. Other Charter Members include: Clayton Burgess, J. B. McPherson, Sr. Mrs. Jeff Burgess, Mrs. Roy Burgess, Sam H. King, Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Watts. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burgess, One Pearl
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community. In May 1973, at the 50th Anniversary of the church - charter member One Pearl Burgess was there. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burgess, Roy (Mrs.)
CHURCHES; HERRINGVILLE BAPTIST: Organized in 1923 on land donated by James D. Herring, and located in the Monticello community. Other Charter Members include: Clayton Burgess, J. B. McPherson, Sr. Mrs. Jeff Burgess, Mrs. Roy Burgess, Sam H. King, Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Watts. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burgoyne, B. R. (Doctor)
PHYSICIANS; MENTIONED IN OLD NEWSPAPERS; RECENT [1977] A recent physician is Dr. B. R. Burgoyne. “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Burkes, John
CHURCHES; ELMWOOD BAPTIST: “Located on Hwy. 882 between L.P. & Monticello [Ward 6] was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1945. Pastors from 1935 to 1976 include: R. O. Bazer, T. H. Mercer, Bryan Bazer, O. O. Bryant, J. R. Culter, Ira Aulds, Walter Watson, F. M. Frissel, C. M. Welch, Pat Morris, Clyde Coulter, R. V. Kinney, John Burkes, Elmer Davis, and Paul Sullivan.” “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burnett in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Burnett, Dellia Nolan March 19, 1911 - Dec. 14, 1964

Burneys in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Burney, Kigian C. April 26, 1833 - March 23, 1884
Burney, Russel J. June 19, 1858 - April 23, 1918
Burney, William P. Died Feb. 10, 1898 Age 57

Burns, R. W.
BLACK CHURCHES; FRIENDSHIP AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Established in 1937. The building, located off LA. Highway 134, burned in 1960 but was immediately rebuilt. The 1st pastor was R. W. Burns, the present one is J. L. Tilmon. [1977] A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Burris, Clara
HOME DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM: The 1st Home Demonstration Agent, Clara Burris, came to the parish in 1917. She made home visits, teaching the women individually. Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Burrus, George
A CONFEDERATE CARROLL; THE VOLUNTEERS: On April 12, 1862, the Confederate Defenders was inducted into the army as Co. K., 31st Louisiana Infantry. This group include E. J. Delony, George Burrus, John Hays, and A. N. McWilliams. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.
WAR’S END: “Sons of Carroll lay buried from Virginia to Baton Rouge. Franc Whicher, Nathan Trotter, George Sanderson, George Burrus, D. D. Kilcrease, B. A. Sanford, W. H. Farrar, and young Wesley McGuirt-these were but a few of the casualties.” Georgia Pinkston’s book “A Place to Remember”

Burton in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Burton, Wade April 05, 1906 - Dec. 08, 1970

Burton, James Ed

RECONSTRUCTION; POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: Some of the Black office holders included David Jackson, Clerk of Court; Charles Hicks, Sheriff; John Asberry, Coroner; Ed Jackson, Record; and J. Ed Burton, Registrar of Voters. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “James E. Burton was Supervisor of Registration about 1875.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Burton, Nicholas
NEWSPAPERS; The Lake Republican: August D. Wright was the editor and Cain Sartain, a Negro man, was one of the proprietors. A 1873 issue: “Hon. Nicholas Burton, Sheriff.“ “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.
RECONSTRUCTION; POLITICS, 1868 - 1877: Blacks succeeded in winning several parish offices in 1871. Five members of the seven man School Board were black - J. A. Gla, Nicholas Burton, David King, F. B. Bertholomy, and Henry Hilliard. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
BLACK CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLY HISTORY: “Cain Sartain of Goodrich Landing was the first representative, and then Senator about 1875. Jim Gardner was also representative but he probably was from West Carroll. Jacques A. Gla, President of the Board of School Directors, lived on the lake front, J. R. Grimes was a pastor and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Nicholas Burton served as Sheriff and the Secretary Treasurer of the School Board.” From “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.
SHERIFF’S 1832-1976; 1873: Nicholas Burton. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Burton, Wade [see Nelson, Selma Sadie]

Burton, William Wade
BIOS: William W. Burton is the son of Wade and Selma Sadie Nelson Burton. He is presently (1977) field engineer with the Standard Oil Company in Louisville, Kentucky. Bill is married to the former Gale Susan Carter of Mer Rouge, Louisiana, and they are the parents of two daughters, Wendy Gale Burton and Christina Belle Burton. “A Place to Remember” Pinkston.

Burwell, Dr. & Mrs.
FIRST-HAND ACCOUNT OF BUNCH’S BEND IN 1840:
Jacob Owen speaks of arriving by boat and landing on Feb. 5, 1840 at Pilcher’s Point and cordially received by the late Mason Pilcher. The road from Bunch’s Bend to L. P. ran through what is now Dr. Burwell’s plantation and cross Black Bayou, about 200 yards from where our little church now stands, we took a bridle path through heavy cane and down near the one and only large cottonwood tree to see the old rendezvouz place of the river pirates. I remember my mother, being deeply sympathized with by Joseph M. Patten, at having to make her home in such a terrible place. From “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston [see also story of Dr. Prescott, and also Owen, Jacob]
PLANTATIONS; OAKLAND: A masque or character portrayal party held at Oakland in the pre-Civil War days illustrated their gracious living. Mrs. Sellers, Hostess of the home, graciously invited her guests to “freely partake of the bountiful supper...” Mrs. Dr. Burwell was mistress of the parlor and dance room: Mrs. Frank Coleman was hostess of the supper room. Guests came dressed as Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Aaron Burr. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston.

Busbey in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Busbey, William R. May 25, 1864 - Aug. 04, 1938

Butlers in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Butler, Helen Olivia Dec. 30, 1941 - May 22, 1948
Butler, Joseph 02/05/1996 - 02/08/1996 C
Butler, Yvonne Riley Died Dec. 27, 1983 Age 57 - CFH Records - No Marker

Butler, C. F. [see also Butler, Reverend]
BLACK CHURCHES; MT. LEBANON BAPTIST CHURCH: It is located on Ransdell Street, Rev. C. F. Butler, Pastor. This church was begun around 1856 on the Caldwell Plantation, but moved onto Ransdell, land formerly owned by Mrs. Lillybell Harden. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston

Butler, Joseph Clarence [see Nelson, Ollie Hyland]

Butler, Reverend
BLACK CHURCHES; CHINA GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH: Organize in 1935 by Robert Paine and family. Mather Honey Beal, Deaconess Elmira Scott, J. W. Walker and others. Meeting were first held in the Winterfield School. In 1950 land upon which to build a church was bought from Martha Claiborne. Rev. Butler is the present pastor. [1977]“A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Byerley/Byerly in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Byerley, Frank July 11, 1895 - Dec. 27, 1896 Born at Portsmouth, England

Byerley, C. J.
TOWN UTILITIES: “The electric light and water plant, erected in 1905, was located on Lake St. “between the blacksmith shop of C. J. Byerly and the Firemen’s Hall”. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Byerley, Carrie
TEACHERS & SCHOOLS: 1897-1914: In 1901 Miss Eddie Bass, Miss Carrie Byerly and Miss Elodie Brown wee new teachers. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Byerley, Frank
BIOGRAPHIES: “Frank Byerley has had one of the most colorful and varied careers of any resident. He was a World War I veteran, a pilot for a newspaper, a farmer, and for 20 yrs was Secretary-Treasurer of the E. C. Parish Police Jury. Frank came from Mississippi with his parents. He was tutored privately by Mrs. J. C. Purdy, Sr., and graduated from the University of the South at Sewanee, TN, where he majored in science. He was President of his graduating class. He learned to fly at Scott Field, Belleviume, Belleville, Illinois, while he was in service. After graduation he came a pilot for the Detroit News, a flying witer and photographer all over the country and Alaska to cover the news. Byerley later flew an auto-gyro and demonstrated it at air shows. His associates during these years included: Amelia Earhart, Jimmy Doolittle and Wylie Post. When on assignment with the Detroit News, President Hoover and former President Coollidge were dedicating a monument for the late President Taft, when Frank in the autogyro was shooting aerial pictures, not knowing that the ceremony had started early, the President inquired who the pilot was and personally ordered him “grounded“. Frank returned to L. P. around 1920 to care for his mother and her farming interests. He also became head football coach at L.P.H.S. His championship team was in 1922.
CLUBS; AMERICAN LEGIONAIRES: The American Legion, local Post Number 37, Powell-Martin-Barrett, was named for three heroes who gave their lives for their country in WWI. Organized in 1920, two of the charter members still living are William McFarland Long and Frank Byerly. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.
CLUBS; ROTARY CLUB INTERNATIONAL: Organized on October 29, 1935. One of the past presidents of the Rotary Club of L. P., Louisiana for 1946-47 was 1952-53 Frank A. Byerly. From "A Place to Remember", Georgia Pinkston
TRANSPORTAION; AIRPORTS: Byerly Airport, named in honor of Frank Byerly, who pioneered in aviation during WWI and after, has a current aircraft movement annually of 8,200 planes (60% agricultural and local, 40% business trips). About 1, 220 passengers annually go through the airport. [1977] “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

Byerley, Frank (Mrs.)
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY: “This associate of the Legion, Powell-Martin-Barrett Unit Number 37, was organized in Aug. 1926. One of the 1st officers was Mrs. Frank Byerly, Chaplain. From the book “A Place to Remember”, by Georgia Pinkston.

Byrnes in Lake Providence Cemetery:
Byrne, Cecelia Marie March 22, 1890 - March 22, 1892 Age 2 yrs., daughter of T. J. & L. A. Byrne
Byrne, Maggie McAuley 1844 - 1915 Age 71 yrs. DM W/Timothy Byrne
Byrne, Marie Celestial 1892 - 1895 Age 2 yrs. 6 months.
Byrne, Marguerite March 22, 1890 - Aug. 20, 1890 Age 4 months 29 days, daughter of T. J. & L. A. Byrne
Byrne, Timothy 1827 - 1902 Age 75 yrs - DM W/Maggie McAuley Byrne

Byrnes, Mrs.
CHURCHES; ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: Father Gentille founded the Altar Society on Dec. 17, 1871. Mrs. Byrnes was elected Secretary of the Altar Society. “A Place to Remember”, Georgia Pinkston

Byrne, T.
LAW; THE THREE COURTHOUSES: In 1888, R. W. Williams, President of the Police Jury, was authorized to accept the bid of T. Byrne for brick to erect a “fire proof record-keeping building on the courthouse square”. “A Place to Remember”, Pinkston.

***NOTE: Please help me to identify some of the students from the 1929 Echo (school annual) Go to another one of my blogs to do this: http://oddballthings.blogspot.com/

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